Actions Nationwide Back America’s Workers and the American Dream

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    Mar 15, 2011 9:48 PM GMT
    A lot is at stake here and workers rally in the nation and worldwide.

    Actors Lucas Neff, Susan Sarandon and Tony Shalhoub attended the rally. Shaloub represented the Screen Actors (SAG). Neff, a member of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), said: “This is not the government of Scott Walker, this is not the government of the Koch brothers, this is the government of the people, by the people and for the people. And we the people will not be defeated.”
    While workers were marching in Madison, Walker left town for a fundraiser in Washburn, Wis., but he couldn’t escape the hundreds of protesters, who gathered outside the event (see video).

    http://blog.aflcio.org/2011/03/14/standing-up-fpr-workers-and-the-american-dream/
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    Mar 15, 2011 10:05 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    jockgymboy saidA lot is at stake here and workers rally in the nation and worldwide.

    Actors Lucas Neff, Susan Sarandon and Tony Shalhoub attended the rally. Shaloub represented the Screen Actors (SAG). Neff, a member of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), said: “This is not the government of Scott Walker, this is not the government of the Koch brothers, this is the government of the people, by the people and for the people. And we the people will not be defeated.”

    While workers were marching in Madison, Walker left town for a fundraiser in Washburn, Wis., but he couldn’t escape the hundreds of protesters, who gathered outside the event (see video).

    http://blog.aflcio.org/2011/03/14/standing-up-fpr-workers-and-the-american-dream/





    And what are the rest of the "workers" called - you know, the other 88% who aren't in a union?
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    Mar 15, 2011 10:08 PM GMT
    Those other workers will face similar attacks in the future and are rallying alongside union workers. What happens to union workers will eventually affect every American worker.
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    Mar 15, 2011 10:19 PM GMT
    jockgymboy saidThose other workers will face similar attacks in the future and are rallying alongside union workers. What happens to union workers will eventually affect every American worker.


    In what way? As I think even Christian and I have noted, the nature of work itself has been changing. Unions in that sense in the private sector at least in the West where it is becoming increasingly knowledge based and in much smaller firms, is almost anachronistic?

    Unions have been most effective in environments where employers have been clearly antagonistic in the work environment - particularly the physical environment - but that's changed. Now unions especially in the private sector are most associated with firms that are slow moving and bureaucratic.

    In a public sector context, there seems to be a clear conflict of interest between taxpayers and government employees/politicians where government employees and unions are quite organized and also contribute significantly to politicians who support them. And because the cost is distributed over a much larger tax base, most people don't notice - especially since the benefits were negotiated long ago and didn't hit the budgets in the years that they were negotiated but are really starting to impact budgets now.
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    Mar 15, 2011 10:23 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    jockgymboy saidA lot is at stake here and workers rally in the nation and worldwide.

    Actors Lucas Neff, Susan Sarandon and Tony Shalhoub attended the rally. Shaloub represented the Screen Actors (SAG). Neff, a member of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), said: “This is not the government of Scott Walker, this is not the government of the Koch brothers, this is the government of the people, by the people and for the people. And we the people will not be defeated.”

    While workers were marching in Madison, Walker left town for a fundraiser in Washburn, Wis., but he couldn’t escape the hundreds of protesters, who gathered outside the event (see video).

    http://blog.aflcio.org/2011/03/14/standing-up-fpr-workers-and-the-american-dream/





    And what are the rest of the "workers" called - you know, the other 88% who aren't in a union?

    The Sleeping Giant ... icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 15, 2011 11:53 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    jockgymboy saidThose other workers will face similar attacks in the future and are rallying alongside union workers. What happens to union workers will eventually affect every American worker.


    In what way? As I think even Christian and I have noted, the nature of work itself has been changing. Unions in that sense in the private sector at least in the West where it is becoming increasingly knowledge based and in much smaller firms, is almost anachronistic?

    Unions have been most effective in environments where employers have been clearly antagonistic in the work environment - particularly the physical environment - but that's changed. Now unions especially in the private sector are most associated with firms that are slow moving and bureaucratic.

    In a public sector context, there seems to be a clear conflict of interest between taxpayers and government employees/politicians where government employees and unions are quite organized and also contribute significantly to politicians who support them. And because the cost is distributed over a much larger tax base, most people don't notice - especially since the benefits were negotiated long ago and didn't hit the budgets in the years that they were negotiated but are really starting to impact budgets now.


    I agree that the nature of work is changing, but that doesn't mean that unions are outdated. Particularly in the public sector. where job stability can move with the political winds.

    I also think this public workers/government conflict of interest argument is such stunning bullshit. Frankly, I'd be embarrassed to push that one.

    If one of you could tell me the difference between unions raising money, and getting out the vote for politicians who may be involved in their contract negotiations in much the same way as corporations raise and give money and get out the vote for politicians who may be involved in negotiating subsidies, tax breaks, and regulations that will impact their industry. And keep in mind that the money used by unions is all voluntary contributions in keeping with our IRS laws.
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    Mar 16, 2011 1:07 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 saidMost unionized Federal employees do not have the ability to collectively bargain for wages and benefits.

    Where are the protests in Washington DC?

    Where are the signs being held by unionized Federal employees equating Obama to Hitler?

    Where are the sit ins on the Mall?

    Why haven't the Democrats - who controlled all branches of the Federal government for the past two years - corrected this grave injustice?


    Would you please let this strawman argument rest? You're like a windup doll that only says three things. It's really tedious. I don't mind disagreeing/debating/arguing with you, but for the last couple of weeks all you do is find one or two comments you like, post them on a couple of threads and then start a thread about same. It's really irritating. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Mar 16, 2011 1:25 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    Christian73 said
    southbeach1500 saidMost unionized Federal employees do not have the ability to collectively bargain for wages and benefits.

    Where are the protests in Washington DC?

    Where are the signs being held by unionized Federal employees equating Obama to Hitler?

    Where are the sit ins on the Mall?

    Why haven't the Democrats - who controlled all branches of the Federal government for the past two years - corrected this grave injustice?


    Would you please let this strawman argument rest? You're like a windup doll that only says three things. It's really tedious. I don't mind disagreeing/debating/arguing with you, but for the last couple of weeks all you do is find one or two comments you like, post them on a couple of threads and then start a thread about same. It's really irritating. icon_rolleyes.gif


    Besides you being irritated.... how do you explain the apparent "second class union citizen status" of most of the Federal employees?

    Where's the "union love" for them?


    Frankly, I haven't had the time to dig into what motivated the Carter administration to eliminate most collective bargaining right for federal workers. Regardless, short of issues involved national security, I can't for the life of me understand why they wouldn't be able to organize. There's actually a very good chance that federal workers - outraged by what's happening across the country - may decide to organize to reverse that.

    There difference between you and me is that I never argue for less rights for workers. Whereas you take whatever position is most anti-worker, anti-Obama, anti-liberal, no matter how intellectually or philosophically incoherent that might be.