Japan Earthquake/Tsunami Relief

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    Mar 17, 2011 3:05 AM GMT
    Hello, RealJock community,

    The news of the crisis in Japan is steadily getting worse as the days go by.

    From August 2007 to August 2010, I lived in Kamaishi, a small port town on the northeastern coast of Japan. It is about 3 hours north of Sendai, and 100 km northwest of the epicenter of the earthquake. The quake and resulting tsunami have devastated my second home. Video of the tsunami swallowing the port whole: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/japan/8375413/Cars-swept-away-by-Japan-tsunami.html

    Dozens of my close friends remain missing or are waiting day after day in shelters.

    If you can spare anything, please consider a donation to any of these charities:

    www.2hj.org

    www.unicefusa.org/japan

    www.internationalmedicalcorps.org

    www.redcross.org

    Anything you can do to help would be amazing.

    -Patrick
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    Mar 17, 2011 3:09 AM GMT
    If anyone knows of other places to donate, please update here!
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    Mar 17, 2011 3:47 AM GMT
    AmeriCares is another reputable organization that has a great record for providing assistance and disaster relief throughout the world.

    http://www.americares.org/
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    Mar 17, 2011 4:13 AM GMT
    I'll repost what I had in another thread:

    So apparently the people who I follow who are in the world of disaster relief, do not believe that we should be donating to Japan at this point as the money won't do much good at this point particularly to the more established institutions and that some charities are taking advantage of our compassion towards what are clearly horrific events that have happened.

    Read more here:
    http://blog.givewell.org/2011/03/15/update-on-how-to-help-japan-funding-is-not-needed-we-recommend-giving-to-doctors-without-borders-to-promote-better-disaster-relief-in-general/
    We believe that

    Those affected have requested very little, limited aid. Aid being offered far exceeds aid being requested. (Details below.)
    Charities are aggressively soliciting donations, often in ways we feel are misleading (more on this in future posts).
    Any donation you make will probably be used (a) by the charity you give it to, for activities in a different country; (b) for non-disaster-relief-and-recovery efforts in Japan.
    If you’re looking to pursue (a) and help people in need all over the world, we recommend giving to the best charity you can, rather than basing your giving on who is appealing to you most aggressively with images and language regarding Japan.
    If you prefer (b), a gift to the Japanese Red Cross seems reasonable.


    and here:
    http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/03/14/dont-donate-money-to-japan/
    Individuals are doing it, banks are doing it — faced with the horrific news and pictures from Japan, everybody wants to do something, and the obvious thing to do is to donate money to some relief fund or other.
    Please don’t.

    We went through this after the Haiti earthquake, and all of the arguments which applied there apply to Japan as well. Earmarking funds is a really good way of hobbling relief organizations and ensuring that they have to leave large piles of money unspent in one place while facing urgent needs in other places. And as Matthew Bishop and Michael Green said last year, we are all better at responding to human suffering caused by dramatic, telegenic emergencies than to the much greater loss of life from ongoing hunger, disease and conflict. That often results in a mess of uncoordinated NGOs parachuting in to emergency areas with lots of good intentions, where a strategic official sector response would be much more effective. Meanwhile, the smaller and less visible emergencies where NGOs can do the most good are left unfunded.

    In the specific case of Japan, there’s all the more reason not to donate money. Japan is a wealthy country which is responding to the disaster, among other things, by printing hundreds of billions of dollars’ worth of new money. Money is not the bottleneck here: if money is needed, Japan can raise it. On top of that, it’s still extremely unclear how or where organizations like globalgiving intend on spending the money that they’re currently raising for Japan — so far we’re just told that the money “will help survivors and victims get necessary services,” which is basically code for “we have no idea what we’re going to do with the money, but we’ll probably think of something.”


    Read both articles in full for their rationale. It's counterintuitive, and some might even think mean spirited, but also having the misfortune of seeing how the generosity of others can be grossly perverted in the name of those who really do need help, it's worth at least a read before you give.
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    Mar 17, 2011 4:30 AM GMT
    Also an interesting/useful discussion here:
    http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2011/03/15/what-aid-makes-sense-for-japan/
  • musclmed

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    Mar 17, 2011 4:34 AM GMT
    there is a chance, that the best way we can help is possibly allowing evacuating japanese to stay in host countries.

    Honestly who know what the hell is happening over there.

    Our president is voting present on this topic. How can 4 reactors be allowed to melt down?

    Tokyo is emptying and everyone is going south. If there is another Earthquake who knows what will happen.
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    Mar 17, 2011 4:44 AM GMT
    chogenki saidIf anyone knows of other places to donate, please update here!


    I recommend donating directly to Japanese organizations such as Red Cross Japan. You can be more confident that the monies actually reach Japan and not some bank account in the States, etc.
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    Mar 17, 2011 5:08 AM GMT
    TerraFirma said
    chogenki saidIf anyone knows of other places to donate, please update here!


    I recommend donating directly to Japanese organizations such as Red Cross Japan. You can be more confident that the monies actually reach Japan and not some bank account in the States, etc.


    Before you do:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/16/world/asia/16charity.html?ref=stephaniestrom

    The Japanese Red Cross…has said repeatedly since the day after the earthquake that it does not want or need outside assistance. But that has not stopped the American Red Cross from raising $34 million through Tuesday afternoon in the name of Japan’s disaster victims…

    The American Red Cross keeps 9 percent of any money it raises, which means that as of Tuesday afternoon, it had raised more than $3 million for itself through the Japan campaign. It also plans to cover the costs of the shelters it opened in California and Hawaii when there were warnings that a tsunami might hit there, estimated at somewhat less than $100,000.

    The Japanese government so far has accepted help from only 15 of the 102 countries that have volunteered aid, and from small teams with special expertise from a handful of nonprofit groups…

    …[M]any of the groups raising money in Japan’s name are still uncertain to whom or to where the money will go…

    Holden Karnofsky, a founder of GiveWell, a Web site that researches charities, said he was struck by how quickly many nonprofit groups had moved to create ads using keywords like “Japan,” “earthquake,” “disaster,” and “help” to improve the chances of their ads showing up on Google when the words were used in search queries.

    “Charities are aggressively soliciting donations around this disaster, and I don’t believe these donations necessarily are going to be used for relief or recovery in Japan because they aren’t needed for that,” Mr. Karnofsky said. “The Japanese government has made it clear it has the resources it needs for this disaster.”

    Robert Ottenhoff, president and chief executive of GuideStar, a Web site that provides charity tax forms and other resources for donors, said donors themselves were to blame for the fund-raising frenzy.

    People who really want to support charitable organizations and good works, Mr. Ottenhoff said, should base it on a desire to support something they already understand and believe in.


    More here: http://aidwatchers.com/2011/03/does-japan-need-your-donation/
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    Mar 17, 2011 6:29 AM GMT
    In response to the above:

    the first organization I listed, www.2hj.org, is a Japan-based food bank, so you can bypass the "profiteering" charities by giving directly to an organization who won't be a middleman between you and charitable giving for Japan.
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    Mar 17, 2011 9:43 AM GMT
    chogenki saidHello, RealJock community,

    The news of the crisis in Japan is steadily getting worse as the days go by.

    From August 2007 to August 2010, I lived in Kamaishi, a small port town on the northeastern coast of Japan. It is about 3 hours north of Sendai, and 100 km northwest of the epicenter of the earthquake. The quake and resulting tsunami have devastated my second home. Video of the tsunami swallowing the port whole: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/japan/8375413/Cars-swept-away-by-Japan-tsunami.html

    Dozens of my close friends remain missing or are waiting day after day in shelters.

    If you can spare anything, please consider a donation to any of these charities:

    www.2hj.org

    www.unicefusa.org/japan

    www.internationalmedicalcorps.org

    www.redcross.org

    Anything you can do to help would be amazing.

    -Patrick


    I used to live in Japan too, so I am also quite worried about the situation over there. Most of my japanese friends are ok, but I have some judo aquaintances near Sendai, who I don't know about. also the situation with the nuclear plant is still of great concern for the whole country.
    Like it is for you, Japan is also like a second home to me, and it is really hard to see what's happening there. icon_sad.gif
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    Mar 17, 2011 9:46 AM GMT
    From President Obama during his NCAA picks.

    www.USAID.GOV

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    Mar 17, 2011 9:46 AM GMT
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