I NEVER see any negative articles about the Government of Canada.

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    Mar 21, 2011 2:16 PM GMT
    87665dude-wtf-posters1z.jpg
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    Mar 21, 2011 2:25 PM GMT

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/1424458



    ...and there was another about a Manitoba mine and the Conservative gov't in Canada.

    ...and another about Mr Harper trying to overturn a law that requires the truth in news. Her's a link to an article about it:
    http://sayitaintsoalready.com/2011/03/02/fox-shut-out-of-canada-because-of-a-law-against-lying-during-newscasts/

    ...the topic fell through the forums like a stone, as most Canadian political topics do because they are
    A) not sensational enough
    B) not about the US
    C) most Canadians don't define their personalities by their politics.

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    Mar 21, 2011 2:31 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/1424458

    Yes, and there have been other issues discussed here. BTW, I believe today was supposed to be the date for a possible no-confidence vote, on the eve of the budget, in which case the present Canadian government could collapse. Perhaps you or other Canadians could keep us informed. Thanks!
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    Mar 21, 2011 2:33 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/1424458



    ...and there was another about a Manitoba mine and the Conservative gov't in Canada.

    ...and another about Mr Harper trying to overturn a law that requires the truth in news. Her's a link to an article about it:
    http://sayitaintsoalready.com/2011/03/02/fox-shut-out-of-canada-because-of-a-law-against-lying-during-newscasts/

    ...the topic fell through the forums like a stone, as most Canadian political topics do because they are
    A) not sensational enough
    B) not about the US
    C) most Canadians don't define their personalities by their politics.




    13 days ago....one article....


    Such a perfect Country.

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    Mar 21, 2011 2:35 PM GMT
    That is probably because in general the canadian government stays at home and minds its own business unlike our US government, which seems intent on sticking our nose in multiple other countries business around the world "for our interests"and our corporations interests who supplies our every increasing desire for more.

    Eventually it will come down to reality that meddling for our "interests", so we can use up nearly 60% of the worlds resorces while we only represent 5% of world population is going to backfire, it already has in the middle east.
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    Mar 21, 2011 2:38 PM GMT

    lol, in some ways, yes, in some ways no. Canadians as a whole take a dim dim view of extremism in any form. This makes us rather boring. icon_wink.gif

    -Doug
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    Mar 21, 2011 2:45 PM GMT
    Canada has 34 million people and 10 provinces/3 territories while the U.S. has 310 million people and 50 states, so just by the numbers there are going to be all together more articles about the U.S. and therefore more negative articles about the U.S.
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    Mar 21, 2011 2:45 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    lol, in some ways, yes, in some ways no. Canadians as a whole take a dim dim view of extremism in any form. This makes us rather boring. icon_wink.gif

    -Doug


    ____________________________________________________________


    Boring eh ? LOL !!!! Minding ones own business in general is a wise choice, because taking care of ones own at home, saves a hell of a lot of uncalled for stress and drama doesn't it.
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    Mar 21, 2011 3:25 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    lol, in some ways, yes, in some ways no. Canadians as a whole take a dim dim view of extremism in any form. This makes us rather boring. icon_wink.gif

    -Doug


    Well I guess you're the exception to that rule because only an extremist can twist my words enough to call me a bigot.
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    Mar 21, 2011 3:49 PM GMT
    mocktwinkie said
    meninlove said
    lol, in some ways, yes, in some ways no. Canadians as a whole take a dim dim view of extremism in any form. This makes us rather boring. icon_wink.gif

    -Doug


    Well I guess you're the exception to that rule because only an extremist can twist my words enough to call me a bigot.



    Sorry Mockbigot, there was no twisting of words required, as most know by simply looking at your past history of posts. Even other US conservatives disagreed with your racism and discrimination in business being fine and let the market decide whether it's OK or not. Bleh. That topic stunk like a pile of month old dirty socks.

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    Mar 21, 2011 10:09 PM GMT
    The PM trying to overturn a law mandating saying the truth on the news? icon_eek.gif

    Now that's a negative thing to say about Canadian politics that they even considered it.

    And a positive thing that they had the law in the first place... thought I hope is a ban on deliberate lying and not a ban on saying something on TV which is untrue by mistake or expressing a belief.

    Nice it didn't happen. I mean, could he have said with a straight face: I'm defending the liberty of people to tell lies to the nation if they want to.

    This Fox News group sounds fishier and fishier the more I read about them.

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    Mar 21, 2011 10:14 PM GMT
    Engineer saidThe PM trying to overturn a law mandating saying the truth on the news? icon_eek.gif

    Now that's a negative thing to say about Canadian politics that they even considered it.

    And a positive thing that they had the law in the first place... thought I hope is a ban on deliberate lying and not a ban on saying something on TV which is untrue by mistake or expressing a belief.

    Nice it didn't happen. I mean, could he have said with an straight face: I'm defending the liberty of people to tell lies to the nation if they want to.

    This Fox News group sounds fishier and fishier the more I read about them.



    _____________________________________________________________

    Oh what a HOOT it would be here in the USA if that were our law !!! that would send most politicians home in a hurry and put Fox, Limbaugh, Hannity, Beck, Palin and company right off the air. most of the other networks at least try to some degree to tell the truth, but if a meter were put on their truthtelling segments they all may dissappear. LOL !!!
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    Mar 21, 2011 10:26 PM GMT
    There are a few reasons for that image of Canada.

    The negative things that the Canadian government, or provincial governments, do tend to get pulled out of the news (somehow). I remember a few years back at anti-globalization protests in Quebec City, the provincial police were found to have been dressing themselves as protesters, then starting fights and vandalizing things in order to give the riot police a reason to break up the protest. The federal government didn't do anything and the provincial government refused to admit it told the police to do that, then the news just stopped reporting about it...

    The current Conservative government rarely gives interviews to the news media, whether official or unofficial (like when the report walks up to some elected official outside the parliament building) because Harper & his politicos have warned no one in the party to speak to reporters. That way there are no sound bytes for the media and no verbal missteps.

    The newest one though is how a law was passed, then the head minister went in secret to the document and inserted a "Not" into the wording, in order for the law to do the exact opposite of what it was intended. When asked about it, she denied knowing anything about the situation even though notes of her requesting the "Not" addition were found.
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    Mar 21, 2011 10:49 PM GMT
    Canada is boring...

    but there are signs of an ugly nazi-esque nationalism taking root, so the politics might perk up.

    Canada20greetings.jpg*

    I am not sure about the hat. Does it look hitlerian enough for you?





    *This is when you know somebody has had quite enough winter and needs to get out of the house. ... icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 21, 2011 10:54 PM GMT
    Because Americans are too polite to stick their noses into another countries' business. ....unlike, the wild banshees to our north....or the true blue Oznarians.
  • CuriousJockAZ

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    Mar 21, 2011 11:01 PM GMT
    Caslon18000 saidBecause Americans are too polite to stick their noses into another countries' business. .....



    Oh really, tell that to the people in Iraq icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

    I have quite a few Canadian clients here as many Canadians are buying up Real Estate in Arizona. Every one of them are so nice, very polite, really down to earth. They also almost always buy their homes with cash --- love that! icon_lol.gif
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    Mar 21, 2011 11:36 PM GMT
    *salutes yourname2000*

    Ditto.
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    Mar 22, 2011 12:48 AM GMT
    A Commons committee has found the minority Conservatives in contempt of Parliament, essentially charging the ruling party with breaking the rules of government.

    On Monday morning, the Commons procedures and House affairs committee began a clause-by-clause debate of its report containing allegations the government kept information and spending estimates concerning tax cuts, prison expansions and fighter-jet procurement secret.

    While the government argued the details in question were subject to cabinet confidentiality, opposition MPs countered that they needed to know everything the government did in order to make an informed decision.

    The opposition-dominated committee, which has already rejected several Tory-backed changes to the report, is expected to conclude the debate and report back to the House before the end of the day.

    The committee met for three days last week, to probe allegations the government breached parliamentary privilege on two fronts: by failing to share cost estimates, and by International Cooperation Minister Bev Oda's alleged involvement in a handwritten "not" scrawled on an international aid agency's already-signed funding proposal.

    During question period in the House of Commons Monday, Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff said Canadians will find it hard to trust the Tories in the face of "such flagrant abuse of power."

    Government House Leader John Baird countered that the Conservative government brought greater accountability to Parliament Hill.

    "Let me be very clear, this government is the government who acted very expeditiously to bring in the Federal Accountability Act, to clean up the ethical mess that we inherited from the previous Liberal government," Baird said.

    Monday's report, which focuses on the cost estimates, is expected to be tabled in the House of Commons by Liberal MP David McGuinty following question period. The Conservatives say they will attach a two-page dissenting report. A separate report on whether Oda intentionally misled Parliament is not expected until Friday.

    In Ottawa, CTV's Richard Madan explained that while the content of the reports may prove embarrassing to the Government, the real political damage may come from what the Opposition does with them.

    The findings of either report could be used to bolster a make-or-break vote in the House, he said.

    Finance Minister Jim Flaherty is set to table the government's latest federal budget on Tuesday. It will be debated on Wednesday and then put to a vote as early as Thursday.

    When pressed to reveal his plans to topple the government or not in the coming days, [Liberal Opposition Leader] Michael Ignatieff refused to be pinned down.

    "I honestly don't know what's going to happen this week but I'm ready for anything. We could go (to the polls) this week or next year," Ignatieff told CTV's Question Period on Sunday.

    Watching developments on Parliament Hill, CTV's Ottawa Bureau Chief Robert Fife said although the signs are pointing to an inevitable election call, "Anything can happen in politics."

    For example, Fife told CTV News Channel on Monday, the Government could have a few surprises in store for its budget announcement.

    "If the government decides to put in some goodies that might entice the NDP or the Bloc Quebecois to support them, if they are able to do that, they might survive," Fife said, adding in that case, "there would probably not be an election until next year."

    The Bloc could be swayed, for instance, if a reported $2-billion compensation package for Quebec's signing onto a harmonized sales tax scheme with Ottawa in 1992 makes an appearance. With their 47 seats in the House of Commons, pulling in the support of the Bloc could have a significant impact on the Conservatives' political prospects.

    Because the ruling Conservatives hold 143 of the 308 seats in the House of Commons, they need the support of at least one opposition party to survive any votes of confidence in the House.

    Liberals currently hold 77 seats, the NDP 36, with five seats either held by independents or vacant.

    If the Government falls this week, it's widely expected Canadians will be called to vote in a federal election on May 2.