Are you an everyday normal HERO ?

  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Mar 21, 2011 6:29 PM GMT
    A friend of mine was in the metro the other day, at night, sharing the same wagon as a 17-20 years old girl who was playing a game on her iPod.

    A man came in the wagon and took the iPod then got away, without even running. The girl went on him, but suddenly, three other guys came out of nowhere and threw her on the floor. My friend went out of the wagon and tried and help her, but new guys came out and they beat him.

    The young guys got back in the metro, as my friend and the girl did, and they called the metro operator to make the metro stop at the next station and call the police. In the end, the young guys were caught and everything went well...

    The only awkward detail is the fact that there was people in the metro, in that same wagon, that were watching the scene and NEVER did anything to help them, not even called the metro operator to warn him this was happening.

    But as soon as the police came to arrest the young kids, they got their cellphone out and filmed the scene...

    There's a lot of story on people who are being attacked and even raped during and in the middle of the rush hour, without nobody coming to their rescue.

    First, I was kind of shocked at this non-social, back-to-feral impassive and unhelpful and egocentric society. But at the same time, you never can predict your reaction in this kind of situation.

    What do you think ? Are you a hero, or more passive ?
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    Mar 21, 2011 6:51 PM GMT
    I can't imagine I would be able to sit around and just watch an individual get brutally beaten or raped, but I also can relate with the fear of reprisal. "What is going to happen to me if I try to get in the middle of this?!" It would be nice if people realized that numbers matter and that if everyone ran to help there would be nothing the aggressor could do. It's tough though to be the first one. I would like to think I could be a hero if the need for one arose.
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    Mar 21, 2011 7:21 PM GMT
    Last summer, I watched a car get stolen. Dude used the clothes hanger trick to unlock the door, but set off the alarm in the process. He got in, started the car in under a minute and drove off with the alarm still going. There were probably 20 people on that block at the time and not one so much as batted an eyelid. As far as I know, I was the only person around who called the police, but I wasn't much use because I didn't catch the plates.

    I thought about approaching him, but this was an area where armed robberies are a relatively frequent occurrence. Hell, just last month a cop was shot and killed about 3 blocks away from where I was. I didn't know whether or not he was packing heat, so I decided that letting some guy steal a car was better than me getting shot in the face for interfering.

    I still feel a little disappointed in myself, but at the same time it's a lot easier to say that you would be a good samaritan than it is to actually be a good samaritan. You also have to take into account that the police could catch him and get the car back or that the owner (hopefully) had their car insured and were able to get a replacement with little to no trouble.

    It sucks, but that's how it goes.
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    Mar 21, 2011 7:25 PM GMT
    nope
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    Mar 21, 2011 8:03 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece said
    There's a lot of story on people who are being attacked and even raped during and in the middle of the rush hour, without nobody coming to their rescue.

    First, I was kind of shocked at this non-social, back-to-feral impassive and unhelpful and egocentric society. But at the same time, you never can predict your reaction in this kind of situation.


    Previous research indicates that the odds of receiving help decrease even as the number of bystanders increases. Since morality exhibited as apathy and goodness of characters can not be tested upon, psychologists have tested factors such as urgency of event, gender, skin color, age, the danger involved, etc.

    Two basic factors are notice: diffusion of responsibility and social norms. Each person in the crowd fails to act because it is assumed some one else will step up. Conformity to social norms is the other factor. If someone initiated help, diffusion of responsibility is not seen.

    It will interest you to know that the bystander has not been noted in 100% of the studies. Additionally, events where a traffic accident or the like happen, the probability of the bystander effect occurring are low.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19025293
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    Mar 21, 2011 9:08 PM GMT
    No, but I am a knight in shining Under Armour. icon_razz.gif
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Mar 22, 2011 12:03 AM GMT
    carminea said
    Disasterpiece said
    There's a lot of story on people who are being attacked and even raped during and in the middle of the rush hour, without nobody coming to their rescue.

    First, I was kind of shocked at this non-social, back-to-feral impassive and unhelpful and egocentric society. But at the same time, you never can predict your reaction in this kind of situation.


    Previous research indicates that the odds of receiving help decrease even as the number of bystanders increases. Since morality exhibited as apathy and goodness of characters can not be tested upon, psychologists have tested factors such as urgency of event, gender, skin color, age, the danger involved, etc.

    Two basic factors are notice: diffusion of responsibility and social norms. Each person in the crowd fails to act because it is assumed some one else will step up. Conformity to social norms is the other factor. If someone initiated help, diffusion of responsibility is not seen.

    It will interest you to know that the bystander has not been noted in 100% of the studies. Additionally, events where a traffic accident or the like happen, the probability of the bystander effect occurring are low.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19025293


    Wow, thanks for this very helpful situation. That's a pretty (sad, but) interesting "psychosocial" topic...

    To Hamburglar => I don't think you should feel dissapointed in yourself. There's no way you should've put your own life in danger for an object (a car, here). I'm referring more to people on people attack.
  • mizu5

    Posts: 2599

    Mar 22, 2011 12:06 AM GMT
    I got robbed in the middle of the day on a bus paltform, and everyone watched, and no one did a thing. THe morons didn't take my phone though, ebcause it was old, so I called the plice and said which bus they got on, and had them arrested.

    SOme idiot guy yelled for everyone to put away their phones incase those men came back. Though one girl WAS yelling at them, not to do it, but I mean.. she wa sliek 14 and could not have helped.
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    Mar 22, 2011 12:25 AM GMT
    ....this is why I avoid public trans :i
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    Mar 22, 2011 1:06 AM GMT
    Everyday normal heroes don't usually publicize the fact.
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Mar 22, 2011 1:18 AM GMT
    eagermuscle saidEveryday normal heroes don't usually publicize the fact.


    Everyday normal heroes read the whole OP's post, not only the title, before answering. icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 22, 2011 1:26 AM GMT
    Disasterpiece said
    eagermuscle saidEveryday normal heroes don't usually publicize the fact.


    Everyday normal heroes read the whole OP's post, not only the title, before answering. icon_wink.gif

    I read your whole post. More people would admit to being passive than promoting themselves as heroic, meaning I don't think many people would admit to being either in the type of situation you posit. But I could be wrong. Let's see how this thread plays out. It's not as if you didn't ask an interesting question.
  • xKorix

    Posts: 607

    Mar 22, 2011 1:37 AM GMT
    Interestingly enough I read a book recently that talked about this subject. The bystander effect is actually caused by a disconnect from feeling. Which is pretty much what our culture is based on, escapism and feeling good and numb at all costs. With a by-stander, they're disconnected from the emotional reactions that SHOULD take place when witnessing a crime(empathy, anger, disgust, etc.), which in turn would create the action of helping the other person. But the reactions are not allowed to happen, so no action takes place.
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    Mar 22, 2011 1:39 AM GMT
    carminea> "diffusion of responsibility... Each person in the crowd fails to act because it is assumed some one else will step up."

    Tragedy of the commons, but also classic game theory. If everyone jumps in, we win. But if only I jump in, I lose.


    Me? I have a permanent protection from evil spell (of undisclosed radius), so nothing like that ever happens around me.


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    Mar 22, 2011 1:42 AM GMT
    Unless I see the scene unfolding I'm not going to do anything...the best intentions can lead to the worst consequences, especially if there are not good Samaritan laws in effect.
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    Mar 22, 2011 1:50 AM GMT
    I'm pretty sure I remember from my first responder class that jumping gung ho into a dangerous and potentially fatal-looking scene is something you should avoid en lieu of alerting the proper authorities. Chasing after criminals or jumping into an altercation is never recommended, and if you do so while you're at a job you'll probably get fired for doing so.
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    Mar 22, 2011 2:12 AM GMT
    If he or she saves someone from danger and lives, he or she is a rescuer.

    If he or she dies trying to save someone, THAT is a hero.
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    Mar 22, 2011 2:12 AM GMT
    Three times in 30 years I've tried to help thwart robberies. I succeeded twice & escaped harm in all cases. But, as I learned later, I could have been injured or worse in one case, if I hadn't stopped chasing thieves (after they dropped a fur they'd stolen and kept running), as they were carrying a gun and a knife.

    In the most recent case, I tried to intercept a thief running down the sidewalk toward me, as his chaser yelled for help from behind him. He bounced off me and was able to escape. As it turned out, the robbery only consisted of $30 of toiletries from the corner pharmacy (I risked my health for that?). My body was sore for the next week. I've begun to realize that it's not always smart to intervene, though it's tough to make the right decision quickly in a crisis.
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Mar 22, 2011 5:34 AM GMT
    Ariodante saidI'm pretty sure I remember from my first responder class that jumping gung ho into a dangerous and potentially fatal-looking scene is something you should avoid en lieu of alerting the proper authorities. Chasing after criminals or jumping into an altercation is never recommended, and if you do so while you're at a job you'll probably get fired for doing so.


    I mostly agree here, but nowadays, people won't even care about alerting the proper authorities. Instead, they'll rush to inform their 874 semi-friends on Facebook of the awkward situation that just changed their view of their insipid miserable life. icon_confused.gif
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    Mar 22, 2011 2:06 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece said
    Ariodante saidI'm pretty sure I remember from my first responder class that jumping gung ho into a dangerous and potentially fatal-looking scene is something you should avoid en lieu of alerting the proper authorities. Chasing after criminals or jumping into an altercation is never recommended, and if you do so while you're at a job you'll probably get fired for doing so.


    I mostly agree here, but nowadays, people won't even care about alerting the proper authorities. Instead, they'll rush to inform their 874 semi-friends on Facebook of the awkward situation that just changed their view of their insipid miserable life. icon_confused.gif

    You're both right! The recent firing of a WalMart employee for apprehending a shoplifter in the parking lot, and nightly news segments featuring cellphone vids of old ladies beating off muggers with their purses sans assistance, immediately come to mind.