Poll: Public losing patience with Republican controlled Congress

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    Mar 22, 2011 1:19 PM GMT
    Overall, the public continues to be dissatisfied with government, but the drop in approval for the Republican-controlled Congress is a stunningly quick case of buyer's remorse.

    McClatchy Poll: Public already losing patience with new Congress

    WASHINGTON — Once again, the public is getting increasingly disgusted with Washington.

    It sees a failure to adopt remedies for even the most basic, pressing issues of the day, as Congress struggles to craft a federal budget. And incumbents are getting worried about the political implications.

    "It's hurting some of us," said Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, who's up for re-election next year. "They blame everybody."

    A new Pew Research Center poll shows that about half of Americans think the debate over spending and deficits has been "generally rude and disrespectful."

    There's even bipartisan agreement — 48 percent of Republicans and Democrats have that view, as well as 57 percent of independents. President Barack Obama signed legislation Friday to provide funding to keep the government open until April 8, the sixth such temporary extension in the 6-month-old fiscal year.

    Pew surveyed 1,525 adults from March 8-14. The poll's findings suggest the political losers so far have been Republicans, who rode a wave of voter irritation to win control of the House of Representatives last fall.

    After the election, 35 percent said Republicans had a better approach to the deficit, expected to reach a record $1.65 trillion this year. This month, that number has plunged to 21 percent.

    People don't think Obama has better ideas, either — 20 percent found his approach better, down from November's 24 percent. Total sample margin of error is plus or minus 3 percentage points.

    The most restless constituency has involved supporters of the conservative tea party movement. After the November election, where backers helped elect dozens of congressional Republicans, three of four movement supporters liked GOP budget plans. This month that figure dropped to 52 percent.

    "People are growing impatient," said Carroll Doherty, Pew associate director.

    They've been impatient for years. In 2006, voters gave Democrats control of both Houses of Congress for the first time in 12 years. Two years later, Obama, a Democrat, reclaimed the White House for his party after eight years of Republican George W. Bush. Last year, Republicans reclaimed control of the House.

    "The American public is getting tired of change elections and then not seeing change. There have been three change elections in a row, but people today figure things are still adrift," said Lee Miringoff, the director of the Marist Institute for Public Opinion, which conducts the McClatchy-Marist poll.

    Political veterans are scrambling to educate their constituents about the deliberate pace of Washington.

    "People should understand we do things in baby steps," said Tea Party Express co-founder Sal Russo, of Sacramento, Calif. "We have to remind people that while we just had a historic election, the reality is, we're woefully short of 60 votes in the Senate." Democrats control 53 of the Senate's 100 seats.

    But Russo's fighting a world where the public can get instant, nonstop, unfiltered access to Congress and commentary.

    Republicans had benefited from that openness during the two-year fight over overhauling the nation's health care system. Procedural delays forced major votes to occur after midnight, and in one case, at dawn on Christmas Eve.

    GOP opponents used what looked like procedural chaos to portray Democrats as unable to run Congress effectively. Now, though, it's Republicans who are in charge of the House, and they're feeling the heat.

    The public doesn't understand all the nuances of the legislative process, so what they see "reinforces the perception that Washington can't get anything done," said Nathan Gonzales, political editor of the Rothenberg Report, which follows congressional races.

    House Republicans, who have a 241-192 majority, have found it relatively easy to win approval of their major initiatives: repealing the health care law, cutting $61 billion from current-year spending, blocking federal funding for public broadcasting and so on.

    The stumbling block has been the Senate. Health care repeal and the $61 billion spending cuts died there, and the effort to defund NPR is also expected to go nowhere.

    One way to explain the process, Hatch said, is to stress the value of experience.

    He talks about how, in January 2009, veteran pilot Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger steered a disabled US Airways plane into the Hudson River in New York City. The passengers and crew all survived.

    "Experience matters," said Hatch, "and when you explain that, it makes people stop and think."

    What may help incumbents more are two developments.

    One is that, unlike the health care fight, the budget battle isn't dominating headlines. Since the start of 2011, three stories have gotten the most attention: The Jan. 8 shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, an Arizona Democrat; the Middle East turmoil, and Japan's earthquake and tsunami.

    "Washington's fights have not broken through as a top story," said Doherty of Pew.

    Even if they do, the 2012 elections are a long way off. Health care legislation won final approval a year ago, during the primary season.

    But if the economy rebounds strongly this year, or a grand budget compromise is reached, process chaos could be long forgotten. In that case, said Gonzales, "results will matter most."

    But if the economy continues to stumble, or the budget fight drags on and on, the fractured process could matter a lot.

    "If the government shuts down," said Gonzales, "no one really knows what the political fallout will be."
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    Mar 22, 2011 1:29 PM GMT
    Not surprisingly, your thread title and opening sentence are a spin, a distortion, and wishful thinking. While the poll article says the Republicans fell more, it was nothing like stunning or buyer's remorse. The biggest message was overall dissatisfaction with government. If you really want to see an example of falling poll numbers, just look at Obama's.
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    Mar 22, 2011 1:31 PM GMT
    As several of us have discussed, the far righters and wingnuts in the republican party are taking things too far with their influence. nearly 4 months in office and all they've accomplished is cutting programs for the masses and not done one thing toward improving the job situation. They've also put in a lot of effort to forward the interests of their backers the Corps. and of course the Koch Bro's. defunded NPR, OH WHAT A SUCCESS THAT WAS !!!

    The pendulum will swing right back to the dems.

    Republicans, WHERE ARE THE JOBS ?
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    Mar 22, 2011 1:38 PM GMT
    socalfitness saidNot surprisingly, your thread title and opening sentence are a spin, a distortion, and wishful thinking. While the poll article says the Republicans fell more, it was nothing like stunning or buyer's remorse. The biggest message was overall dissatisfaction with government. If you really want to see an example of falling poll numbers, just look at Obama's.


    Dropping 14% in two months is pretty stunning.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Mar 22, 2011 1:50 PM GMT
    Ahhhhhh, yet another poll to try and convince the masses of something. Take it with a grain of salt. Polls don't mean anything other than it's just another poll. I'm sure there is a poll out there somewhere that says something completely opposite.
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Mar 22, 2011 1:55 PM GMT
    republicans: WHERE ARE THEY JOBS YOU PROMISED WHEN YOU TOOK OVER CONGRESS????

    well, boehner????
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Mar 22, 2011 1:57 PM GMT
    socalfitness saidNot surprisingly, your thread title and opening sentence are a spin, a distortion, and wishful thinking. While the poll article says the Republicans fell more, it was nothing like stunning or buyer's remorse. The biggest message was overall dissatisfaction with government. If you really want to see an example of falling poll numbers, just look at Obama's.


    the OP accurately and truthfully quoted the title of his source article....how is that "a spin, a distortion, and wishful thinking"?

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    Mar 22, 2011 1:59 PM GMT
    realifedad saidRepublicans, WHERE ARE THE JOBS?

    Republicans don't need to provide jobs, now that they're in office, that was just the empty campaign promise they made. Their first priority, including at the State level, has been social legislation, especially anti-minority, anti-union & labor, and anti-gay. All the constituencies they calculate to be supporters of the Democrats rather than of them. And to silence NPR, so fewer remnants of real news reach the voters, just FOX and right-wing talk radio.

    In their budget they're planning for more tax breaks for the rich and for corporations. Which they'll claim is how they're meeting their promise of creating jobs. Well, put on your maid's outfits, girls, we're gonna go work for the rich folk now. icon_razz.gif

    True story: Just this past Sunday, after the AIDS Walk, we met a gay couple at Rosie's, that had a team from the restaurant participating, and that had run one of the water points on the route. Seems this couple had lost their career jobs with a corporation that was outsourcing.

    So what were they doing now? Running a 2-man yacht cleaning service out of Fort Lauderdale! Seems there's no shortage of personal yachts to clean, despite the recession, and so they've become nautical maids. Hey, as the rich get richer the rest of us newly impoverished can always find menial work cleaning up after them. Hooray for Republican trickle-down economics! icon_razz.gif
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    Mar 22, 2011 2:04 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 saidWhat WILL really piss off the public is if the Republican House goes back to the way they were under Boehner back in the mid 2000s and act like Democrats once again.

    If there isn't a significant cut in government spending (i.e. at least back to 2007/8 levels) with the next budget effective October 1, 2011 then the vast majority of the public, which is center-right, will show the current crop of holdover / old-guard Republicans the door in 2012 and - most likely - elect more T.E.A. Party members in their place - which would actually be very good for the country.


    That might be true if anyone cared about the deficit, which they don't when compared to job creation.

    Also, we do not live in a "center-right" country despite the fever dreams of Karl Rove. In fact, the majority of citizens prefer progressive solutions and policies to what plagues us.
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    Mar 22, 2011 2:05 PM GMT
    And when you add the FACT there is no viable Republican to run against Obama.


    obama-laughing.jpg
  • CuriousJockAZ

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    Mar 22, 2011 2:09 PM GMT
    There will be --- whether He/She can actually win is yet to be seen. I do think it's fair to say that Obama is vulnerable
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    Mar 22, 2011 2:36 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    Christian73 said

    the majority of citizens prefer progressive solutions and policies to what plagues us.


    In other words, they prefer more plague.


    Incorrect.
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Mar 22, 2011 2:44 PM GMT
    LeanathleticDC saidAnd when you add the FACT there is no viable Republican to run against Obama....



    (long sigh) all i see is the same, recycled crop of GOP religious nuts, wackos and retreads from the last election.

    are these...people...the BEST the republican party can come up with???


    icon_sad.gif
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    Mar 22, 2011 2:50 PM GMT
    rnch said
    LeanathleticDC saidAnd when you add the FACT there is no viable Republican to run against Obama....



    (long sigh) all i see is the same, recycled crop of GOP religious nuts, wackos and retreads from the last election.

    are these...people...the BEST the republican party can come up with???


    icon_sad.gif
    Lets see..

    Palin? nope she just insulted another group in the base yesterday..
    Trump? Nope, he just insulted the entire country except the crooked business tycoons yesterday.
    Pawlenty? Nope... no traction with anyone except the religious right.
    Daniels? Nope. The party cant stand him.. he's too 'moderate'.
    Romney? nope.. his "obamcare" is being used to crucify him within the party as is his 'mormanism'.
    Huckabee? nope. independents wont stand for a preacher at the pulpit in the oval office..


    hmmmmmm interesting huh?
  • mke_bt

    Posts: 707

    Mar 22, 2011 3:45 PM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    rnch said
    LeanathleticDC saidAnd when you add the FACT there is no viable Republican to run against Obama....



    (long sigh) all i see is the same, recycled crop of GOP religious nuts, wackos and retreads from the last election.

    are these...people...the BEST the republican party can come up with???


    icon_sad.gif
    Lets see..

    Palin? nope she just insulted another group in the base yesterday..
    Trump? Nope, he just insulted the entire country except the crooked business tycoons yesterday.
    Pawlenty? Nope... no traction with anyone except the religious right.
    Daniels? Nope. The party cant stand him.. he's too 'moderate'.
    Romney? nope.. his "obamcare" is being used to crucify him within the party as is his 'mormanism'.
    Huckabee? nope. independents wont stand for a preacher at the pulpit in the oval office..


    hmmmmmm interesting huh?


    John Huntsman? Too moderate. Too morman. Too Obama.
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    Mar 22, 2011 4:02 PM GMT
    McCain? LOL
    Barbour? LOL
    Jindahl? LOL
    Dole? LOL
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    Mar 22, 2011 4:03 PM GMT
    mke_bt said
    TropicalMark said
    rnch said
    LeanathleticDC saidAnd when you add the FACT there is no viable Republican to run against Obama....



    (long sigh) all i see is the same, recycled crop of GOP religious nuts, wackos and retreads from the last election.

    are these...people...the BEST the republican party can come up with???


    icon_sad.gif
    Lets see..

    Palin? nope she just insulted another group in the base yesterday..
    Trump? Nope, he just insulted the entire country except the crooked business tycoons yesterday.
    Pawlenty? Nope... no traction with anyone except the religious right.
    Daniels? Nope. The party cant stand him.. he's too 'moderate'.
    Romney? nope.. his "obamcare" is being used to crucify him within the party as is his 'mormanism'.
    Huckabee? nope. independents wont stand for a preacher at the pulpit in the oval office..


    hmmmmmm interesting huh?


    John Huntsman? Too moderate. Too morman. Too Obama.
    Too unknown.
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    Mar 22, 2011 4:15 PM GMT
    Saw this sentence on line today:


    The 2012 Republican field is deeply flawed, lacking a serious GOP contender without a personal misstep or policy move that angers the party base.

    Already, Internet sites like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are magnifying their woes, and every embarrassing document, speech or utterance is certain to appear online.



    tee-hee.jpg


  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Mar 22, 2011 4:46 PM GMT
    TropicalMark said

    Palin? nope she just insulted another group in the base yesterday..
    Trump? Nope, he just insulted the entire country except the crooked business tycoons yesterday.
    Pawlenty? Nope... no traction with anyone except the religious right.
    Daniels? Nope. The party cant stand him.. he's too 'moderate'.
    Romney? nope.. his "obamcare" is being used to crucify him within the party as is his 'mormanism'.
    Huckabee? nope. independents wont stand for a preacher at the pulpit in the oval office..hmmmmmm interesting huh?




    Seeing that we don't really know how any of the above potential candidates may or may not stack up with the American people, nor do you have a crystal ball, I think we should wait and see who actually does run. I think Romney has the best shot, and he is a formidable candidate. I wouldn't count Palin out, especially if she comes out swinging with some fresh ideas and some solid proof that she's been doing her homework, as she does have a huge following and the charisma to get people fired up and rallied behind her. Regardless, barring Chris Christy jumping in the race that could change the whole landscape, I think it will be Romey's to lose.
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    Mar 22, 2011 5:00 PM GMT
    "barring Chris Christy jumping in the race that could change the whole landscape"


    On the Richter Scale .....would be a magnitude earthquake 6.5


    obese-man.jpg






    '
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Mar 22, 2011 5:21 PM GMT
    LeanathleticDC said"barring Chris Christy jumping in the race that could change the whole landscape"


    On the Richter Scale .....would be a magnitude earthquake 6.5


    obese-man.jpg






    '


    Make fun all you want, but he has the potential to be a formidable candidate, but I doubt he will run. I bet he does in 2016 though....barring a massive heart attack, of course icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 22, 2011 5:24 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    LeanathleticDC said"barring Chris Christy jumping in the race that could change the whole landscape"


    On the Richter Scale .....would be a magnitude earthquake 6.5


    obese-man.jpg






    '


    Make fun all you want, but he has the potential to be a formidable candidate, but I doubt he will run. I bet he does in 2016 though....barring a massive heart attack, of course icon_wink.gif


    Fat jokes aside, I think his 15 minutes are coming to an end. He is vigorously disliked by a good percentage of NJers, and more than 50% disapprove of the job he's doing.

    I think like Palin, the more he's in the public eye the less appealing he becomes.
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    Mar 22, 2011 5:45 PM GMT
    Christian73 saidFat jokes aside, I think his 15 minutes are coming to an end. He is vigorously disliked by a good percentage of NJers, and more than 50% disapprove of the job he's doing.

    I think like Palin, the more he's in the public eye the less appealing he becomes.


    Not quite. "Voters are split on whether they have a favorable or unfavorable impression of Christie, with 46 percent viewing him favorably and 44 percent unfavorably." Considering it's at a blue state in the middle of a bad economy, that doesn't seem bad - especially in the midst of the cutting as people are realizing what's being cut.

    http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2011/03/gov_christies_poll_numbers_dro.html

    and from before: http://www.newjerseynewsroom.com/state/christies-public-disapproval-rating-jumps-10-points-to-42-percent

    Three of five voters, 60 percent, continue to say the state should hold the line on spending even if many programs are reduced, while just a quarter, 23 percent, say the state should raise taxes if necessary and continue to support state programs.
    Asked about limiting public employees to accruing no more than two years vacation time, 74 percent say it's a good idea, while 23 percent say it's a bad idea. Three of five, 60 percent, also say it's a good idea to cap public employee salary increases at 2.5 percent, though public employee households split evenly on the question 46 to 46 percent.

    Similarly, 61 percent say it's a good idea to raise the retirement age for public employees to 65 years of age from 62, while 33 percent disagree, and public employees split again 45 to 51 percent.


    Good news and bad news for everyone - no matter what side of the ideological divide you sit on.
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    Mar 22, 2011 6:12 PM GMT
    stircrazy.jpg

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSwNdfEL1JGN2MO56oxllj


    Huckabee?



    LOL.jpg
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    Mar 22, 2011 7:19 PM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    rnch said
    LeanathleticDC saidAnd when you add the FACT there is no viable Republican to run against Obama....



    (long sigh) all i see is the same, recycled crop of GOP religious nuts, wackos and retreads from the last election.

    are these...people...the BEST the republican party can come up with???


    icon_sad.gif
    Lets see..

    Palin? nope she just insulted another group in the base yesterday..
    Trump? Nope, he just insulted the entire country except the crooked business tycoons yesterday.
    Pawlenty? Nope... no traction with anyone except the religious right.
    Daniels? Nope. The party cant stand him.. he's too 'moderate'.
    Romney? nope.. his "obamcare" is being used to crucify him within the party as is his 'mormanism'.
    Huckabee? nope. independents wont stand for a preacher at the pulpit in the oval office..


    hmmmmmm interesting huh?




    AND very entertaining.
    The clown crew running for the Repub nomination should provide a lot of yucks over the next year or so.