What about YOUR history !?

  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Mar 23, 2011 1:48 AM GMT
    There's very different levels of sociality : family, ethnic group, community, nationality, humanity. Most of them has its own caracteristics, and history that you can relate too, depending on your own choice.

    By example, a lot of french-canadians living in Quebec don't relate at all to Canadian history, but instead, are still attached to New-France and a french separated experience.

    For the first time in my life, I've read a book about the gay's struggle, between all the civil rights movements in the late 1960's, to attain a new level of social recognition. This struggle is not yet over in the US, but much has been done, and much has been written.

    stonewall%2Briots.jpg

    My question is, how much do you relate gay history ?

    Do you consider yourself part of this community, or are you relating to a different social scale instead ?

    What do you know about the american gay liberation movement and "your" community's history in the US (or elsewhere in the world) ?

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    Mar 23, 2011 1:56 AM GMT
    I grew up on the border between two countries. It's amazing what that will do to deprive you of feeling any part of either country's history.
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    Mar 23, 2011 2:00 AM GMT
    My favorite author at the moment is Malcolm Boyd, he was an openly gay clergyman during the civil rights movement and writes about his experience with a definite rawness I thoroughly enjoy. I'm not sure how much I relate to gay history considering I've never really had to go through the discrimination those from the past experienced. I most definitely consider myself to be a part of the gay community; though I am not nearly as active as I would like to be, I am a member of the ACLU.
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Mar 23, 2011 2:01 AM GMT
    Ariodante saidI grew up on the border between two countries. It's amazing what that will do to deprive you of feeling any part of either country's history.


    Then, do you relate to any history at all ? Your family's ? Your community's ? Bacon's history?
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Mar 23, 2011 4:15 AM GMT
    MnKid84 saidMy favorite author at the moment is Malcolm Boyd, he was an openly gay clergyman during the civil rights movement and writes about his experience with a definite rawness I thoroughly enjoy. I'm not sure how much I relate to gay history considering I've never really had to go through the discrimination those from the past experienced. I most definitely consider myself to be a part of the gay community; though I am not nearly as active as I would like to be, I am a member of the ACLU.


    Thanks for this suggestion. The book I read was Martin Baulm Duberman's Stonewall. It's beautifully written and tells a lot about the pre-Stonewall homophile movement through the lives of six gays, lesbians and transvestite, while providing some icon_eek.gif, icon_biggrin.gif and icon_mad.gif moments to the reader.

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    Mar 23, 2011 4:23 AM GMT
    Disasterpiece said
    Ariodante saidI grew up on the border between two countries. It's amazing what that will do to deprive you of feeling any part of either country's history.


    Then, do you relate to any history at all ? Your family's ? Your community's ? Bacon's history?


    Once upon a time there was bacon. And it ended up in MAH BELLY =o~
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    Mar 23, 2011 4:28 AM GMT
    Disasterpiece said
    MnKid84 saidMy favorite author at the moment is Malcolm Boyd, he was an openly gay clergyman during the civil rights movement and writes about his experience with a definite rawness I thoroughly enjoy. I'm not sure how much I relate to gay history considering I've never really had to go through the discrimination those from the past experienced. I most definitely consider myself to be a part of the gay community; though I am not nearly as active as I would like to be, I am a member of the ACLU.


    Thanks for this suggestion. The book I read was Martin Baulm Duberman's Stonewall. It's beautifully written and tells a lot about the pre-Stonewall homophile movement through the lives of six gays, lesbians and transvestite, while providing some icon_eek.gif, icon_biggrin.gif and icon_mad.gif moments to the reader.



    Thanks for sharing that with me, I honestly can't imagine living in a time where it was illegal for me to be who I am. Those were most definitely brave individuals.