Death by Fire? Probably Not

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    Mar 24, 2011 5:36 PM GMT
    Filed under "things to be thankful for" - cool blog for people who are interested in the intersect between economics and human behavior. Read the whole thing at the link.

    http://www.freakonomics.com/2011/03/24/freakonomics-radio-death-by-fire-probably-not/

    Fire-deaths-graph.jpg

    As you can see from the graphic above (which comes from the illustrated edition of SuperFreakonomics), fire deaths in the U.S. have fallen 90 percent over the past 100 years, a great and greatly underappreciated gain. How did it happen — and could we ever get to zero? Those are some of the questions we ask in the latest Freakonomics Radio podcast, “Death By Fire? Probably Not.”

    A pivotal moment in U.S. fire history came exactly 100 years ago, with the Triangle Shirtwaist Company factory fire in New York City. It killed 146 people, most of them young immigrant seamstresses. Until then, fire-prevention priority was given to buildings, not people (in large part because insurance companies had more at stake with buildings).
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    Mar 24, 2011 6:50 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidFiled under "things to be thankful for" - cool blog for people who are interested in the intersect between economics and human behavior. Read the whole thing at the link.

    http://www.freakonomics.com/2011/03/24/freakonomics-radio-death-by-fire-probably-not/

    Fire-deaths-graph.jpg

    As you can see from the graphic above (which comes from the illustrated edition of SuperFreakonomics), fire deaths in the U.S. have fallen 90 percent over the past 100 years, a great and greatly underappreciated gain. How did it happen — and could we ever get to zero? Those are some of the questions we ask in the latest Freakonomics Radio podcast, “Death By Fire? Probably Not.”

    A pivotal moment in U.S. fire history came exactly 100 years ago, with the Triangle Shirtwaist Company factory fire in New York City. It killed 146 people, most of them young immigrant seamstresses. Until then, fire-prevention priority was given to buildings, not people (in large part because insurance companies had more at stake with buildings).


    It should be filed under "things to thank unions for" as the women employed by Triangle unionized following the fire and fought hard to change the fire codes and ensure worker protections.
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    Mar 24, 2011 7:56 PM GMT
    Damn regulations, they stand in the way of me dying by fire.