Eating more, but watching fat

  • trl_

    Posts: 994

    Mar 25, 2011 8:06 PM GMT
    Okay, I'm slowly learning how to actually get close to eating like 2100 calories a day (which i know is not a lot, but i seem to have some type of problem where its hard for me to eat more than 1500 a day). anyway, i was just wondering what i should be looking for in that "Fats" category on the nutrition label.

    I want to keep fat intake down obviously since getting tons of calories that are all fat doesn't help me. what are some good rules of thumb for watching/counting fat calories?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 25, 2011 8:26 PM GMT
    My healthy fats come from peanut butter. The natural kind. If you get regular peanut butter, it has a lot of not-so-healthy fats.

    Most processed foods will also contain the unhealthy types of fats. If you prepare most of your own food, this isn't much of an issue.
  • CDNinOZ

    Posts: 38

    Mar 25, 2011 11:28 PM GMT
    Yes, probably best to start cooking your own meals if you can. Use olive, grape seed or canola oil for cooking in small amounts rather than butter.

    As for reading nutrition labels, best thing is to look at is the breakdown of the various fats. It should list saturated fat and mono- as well as polyunsaturated fat. It may also list transfat.
    Animal fats tend to be saturated so it's best to eat leaner meats (at least cut off visible fat) and use low fat milk.

    Poly and mono-unsaturated are the good fats. Most nuts will contain a higher proportion of these, except maybe coconut.

    Saturated fat is not as good and best eaten in moderation. Stay away from transfats, which are generally found in some processed foods.

    You may also want to read up on the benefits of Omega3 fatty acids which are the so called healthy fats. Some fish are good sources of these as well as flax etc.. There are fish oil supplements which are likely the easiest way to make sure you eat enough O3.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 26, 2011 2:15 AM GMT
    xrichx saidIf you prepare most of your own food, this isn't much of an issue.
    +1
    In addition to teaching myself how to cook, I've also turned away from most restaurants that serve greasy stuff. Now the majority of my eating out is at sushi places, where I can get sushi/sashimi combos for the best mix of carbs, fats, and protein...not to mention it tastes really good!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 26, 2011 6:10 AM GMT
    Cook with pretty much anything except butter, lard, margarine and vegetable oil. And on top of that, nuts are also a fairly healthy fat.

    I'm also a little confused as to what your goal is. Are you trying to build muscle mass? Are you trying to eat healthier? What's the deal?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 26, 2011 6:13 AM GMT
    If you're trying to bulk up I wouldn't worry too much about fats but take these other guys advice and prepare as much of your own food as possible and/or eat minimally processed store bought food.

    I might be totally wrong here but I don't think you have to worry about your fat intake making you fat as much as overdoing your caloric intake. Just try to keep fats to a minimum and if you feel like you're getting big but not in a good way cut back on your overall food.