Super intelligent dog!

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    Mar 30, 2011 5:00 AM GMT
  • disasterpiece

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    Mar 30, 2011 5:10 AM GMT
    I'd say Super Lazy Women.

    The dog is well trained, but it's not necessarily intelligent ;)
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    Mar 30, 2011 5:16 AM GMT
    Teaching a dog to open the refrigerator: sounds like a poor idea
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    Mar 30, 2011 5:18 AM GMT
    Jeez no plain bottled water? Someone's drinking a lot of empty calories.
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    Mar 30, 2011 5:19 AM GMT
    Disasterpiece saidI'd say Super Lazy Women.

    The dog is well trained, but it's not necessarily intelligent ;)


    the ability to learn is intelligence..
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    Mar 30, 2011 5:21 AM GMT
    bahaha i can't believe how catty you all are
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Mar 30, 2011 5:30 AM GMT
    PrinceOfArya said
    Disasterpiece saidI'd say Super Lazy Women.

    The dog is well trained, but it's not necessarily intelligent ;)


    the ability to learn is intelligence..


    I wouldn't limit intelligence to the ability to learn.

    This is, in my opinion, a better example of Pavlovian conditionning than an example of intelligence icon_smile.gif
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    Mar 30, 2011 6:24 AM GMT
    Ariodante saidJeez no plain bottled water? Someone's drinking a lot of empty calories.



    Ahahahaha love it!!
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    Mar 30, 2011 7:25 AM GMT
    Disasterpiece said
    PrinceOfArya said
    Disasterpiece saidI'd say Super Lazy Women.

    The dog is well trained, but it's not necessarily intelligent ;)


    the ability to learn is intelligence..


    I wouldn't limit intelligence to the ability to learn.

    This is, in my opinion, a better example of Pavlovian conditionning than an example of intelligence icon_smile.gif


    this was a straight up dictionary definition not something that's particularly debated.
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    Mar 30, 2011 11:12 AM GMT

    It is a fairly well known fact that dogs (and other pets) do actually enjoy pleasing their masters. They get a lot of attention (which they adore) and they are amply rewarded.
    I do not necessarily believe that this is right or wrong, but I don't think it hurts anyone either.
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    Mar 30, 2011 11:56 AM GMT
    In the past I remember videos of other dogs who'd bring their owners snacks, and beers from the fridge during sports games. More important are trained assistance dogs for the disabled, who can open drawers and bring articles of clothing, distinguishing them by verbal command, among other abilities, like fetching other small objects from around the residence. (Though I'm not sure your socks or shorts in a dog's mouth is very attractive)
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    Mar 30, 2011 12:02 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece said I wouldn't limit intelligence to the ability to learn.
    This is, in my opinion, a better example of Pavlovian conditionning than an example of intelligence icon_smile.gif

    Clearly you've never been to a dog-obedience class. Some of the dogs (like of course, mine) learn new commands very fast. Others take much longer even though the Pavlovian conditioning (dog treats) is exactly the same.
  • Buddha

    Posts: 1765

    Mar 30, 2011 12:09 PM GMT
    Intelligence :E? It's interesting to see how different people use the word I guess. Like I'd call Einstein intelligent, and you can call someone in the military intelligent for being able to follow command. It's always nice to know that we all have... different definitions.

    Also, +1 on what disasterpiece said

    But never the less it was fun to watch. Although the dog never closed the refrigerator-door.
  • Celticmusl

    Posts: 4330

    Mar 30, 2011 12:25 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece said
    PrinceOfArya said
    Disasterpiece saidI'd say Super Lazy Women.

    The dog is well trained, but it's not necessarily intelligent ;)


    the ability to learn is intelligence..


    I wouldn't limit intelligence to the ability to learn.

    This is, in my opinion, a better example of Pavlovian conditionning than an example of intelligence icon_smile.gif




    There are many different forms of intelligence. Spacial intelligence, mechanical reasoning, etc. One form does not negate the others. Yes, the dog did not come up with his own theory of relativity.
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    Mar 30, 2011 12:28 PM GMT
    Teaching a dog to perform a trick for a reward is not really a Pavlovian response. Pavlov was experimenting with conditioned and unconditioned stimulus, not training.

    In his classic example, a dog would salivate when presented with food. The food became associated by the dog with a bell that was rung each time. After a period of conditioning had been performed, if the bell was rung the dog would salivate, even if no food was presented. The salivating is the classic Pavlovian response, not performing a trick for a treat.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Mar 30, 2011 12:35 PM GMT
    That was great, you can tell she has worked with her dog a great deal and the dog really enjoys doing what he/she does when asked.

    I like the retreival of the Mt. Dew....LOL
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    Mar 30, 2011 12:36 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidTeaching a dog to open the refrigerator: sounds like a poor idea



    Intelligence is vital to learn.
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    Mar 30, 2011 12:43 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece sounds like a dog hater to be honest. For an educated person to say a dog is not intelligent is......not very intelligent. As someone posted above, there are obviously varying degrees of intelligence, and just because the dog doesn't know algebra doesn't mean she's not "intelligent."icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Mar 30, 2011 12:51 PM GMT
    I had a kitten who had learned to open house doors by the time he was grown. I assume he watched the humans turning the round door knob (US style) every time a door opened. So when he wanted a door opened for himself, he'd wrap a paw around the knob and turn it. If we wanted to keep him out of a room we'd have to lock it with an old fashioned skeleton key in a classic keyhole (an older house).

    He could do this even from the floor because he was an enormous cat, about 24 pounds but not fat, largest I've ever seen in my life. He could reach the doorknobs by standing on his hind legs, or sometimes reaching over from a nearby furniture item. And he taught that to himself.
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    Mar 30, 2011 12:58 PM GMT
    Cats are smarter because they realize how lame it is to do tricks for treats. icon_lol.gif
  • BeingThePhoen...

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    Mar 30, 2011 1:08 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece said
    PrinceOfArya said
    Disasterpiece saidI'd say Super Lazy Women.

    The dog is well trained, but it's not necessarily intelligent ;)


    the ability to learn is intelligence..


    I wouldn't limit intelligence to the ability to learn.

    This is, in my opinion, a better example of Pavlovian conditionning than an example of intelligence icon_smile.gif

    She was certainly a cutie and well trained, but most dogs can be trained to do these types of things, if trained correctly. I would have been very impressed if she would have thought to close the door to the fridge after everything she took out.
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    Mar 30, 2011 1:10 PM GMT
    I think some people on this thread do not know the difference between intelligent and smart. I'll leave it at that.
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    Mar 30, 2011 1:28 PM GMT
    My dog chases her tail. Sometimes she catches it. That's a clear sign of intelligence, right there. icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 30, 2011 1:43 PM GMT
    _ADA saidCats are smarter because they realize how lame it is to do tricks for treats. icon_lol.gif

    Our doorknob-turning cat was named "Rusty" for his orange fur. And he would do things for me without treats, mostly games of chasing and "cat & mouse."

    Out in the yard he always came to his name, and when I tapped the brick porch steps with my hand he'd jump up, and then I'd tap my chest. He'd come right over, lower his head down and butt me like a goat where I pointed. Then he'd sorta grind his head into my shirt, sometimes purring. Of course he did get a kind of treat in the form of petting from me, but again, nothing I ever really trained him to do, it just developed between us.

    We'd stalk each other in the yard, behind trees and bushes, and also in the house, using furniture. He loved that. Indoors I'd get on my stomach hiding behind a sofa or something, and make a scratching sound with my fingernails. He couldn't resist that, with his classic kitty curiosity and predator instincts. He'd come slinking over all crouched down himself, in full hunt mode, you know how cats advance & freeze, advance & freeze, and he'd find me waiting there to surprise him.

    Sometimes he'd spring straight up like a jack-in-a-box, and run away, or he might charge at me, give me a few paw taps without his claws, and then take off. But he'd be right back for more, we had so much fun. And I'd let him "capture" my arm and give my forearm a tight bear hug, as his hind legs were raking me, his mouth clamped on me in typical cat fight style. But he never used his claws (and he wasn't declawed), nor actually bit, it was all mock attacks.

    Sometimes I'd fail to surprise him, and he'd see me first, his head tilted back so only his eyes were peering over something at me. We'd have a staring contest, and I could see how ready he was to strike by how dilated his eyes were. And then that little wiggle cats do before attacking. Talk about telegraphing your punch!

    I've found that with both cats & dogs a very good way to bond with them is through play, and especially play that simulates what they once did with their litter mates and mother. It also gives them confidence in your good will, and that you trust them yourself, to let them roughhouse with you.
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    Mar 30, 2011 1:47 PM GMT
    Gosh she taught the dog how to open the fridge but didn't teach it how to close it?? The food is going to go bad! NOT IMPRESSED!