Running with plantar fasciatus

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 30, 2011 10:28 AM GMT
    Ive been thru physical therapy & have inserts & great shoes but between working on my feet all night is a killer. Plus my dr said for me not to do squats but I do them anyway which hirts my foot like hell.

    Any suggestions on how I can run while having this? I do the eliptical & bike but love running sometimes. What should I do?
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    Mar 30, 2011 12:42 PM GMT
    You shouldn't run or do squats because you will never heal. If you foot hurts like hell when you do squats, then you should stop. Your body is telling you that you are not making things better.

    Take inflammatory drugs, consistently ice your foot, and wear night splints so you can stretch your foot while you sleep.

    I had plantar fasciitis and had to stop running for 3 weeks. It sucked and was annoying, but my foot healed and running is not a problem for me anymore.
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    Mar 30, 2011 2:39 PM GMT
    I had plantar fasciitis last summer and pretty much stopped running because it didn't seem to be healing. I started cycling more so you might consider that as an option. Running through the pain is really not recommended!

    But if you have to, I have heard that running on a treadmill is easier on your feet than running outdoors on the road.
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    Mar 30, 2011 2:48 PM GMT
    redbull saidIve been thru physical therapy & have inserts & great shoes but between working on my feet all night is a killer. Plus my dr said for me not to do squats but I do them anyway which hirts my foot like hell.

    Any suggestions on how I can run while having this? I do the eliptical & bike but love running sometimes. What should I do?



    WTF? If doc says don't do them, then don't. You're just aggravating it and making it worse.

    I had it about ten years ago so I know the feeling when I was working on my feet too. You need to get some good foot supports, and I mean good, and also you may want to wrap your foot like the athlete's do before running. Just a suggestion and let yourself heal.
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    Mar 30, 2011 3:04 PM GMT
    Ive been dealing with this for 2-3 yrs. Went thru physical therapy, got the expensive inserts & tennis shoes still. But when i try to run it starts hurting again & i can feel it starting to tear again.

    I try stretching as much as i can but it only helps but so much. Ive never tried wrapping my foot though, thats a good idea i might try while running, or trying to.

    Id love to be able to run more. I think its the best cardio, especially on a hot summer day on a wooded trail.
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    Mar 30, 2011 3:12 PM GMT
    You want to stretch your calves too. Apparently that is why the plantar's is causing you pain because it's tight. Two foot doctors told me that. Stretch your calves and you should be good but do it gently. icon_biggrin.gif

    Ask your phys ther what exercises you can do to relieve your discomfort.
  • BoostToChase

    Posts: 103

    Mar 30, 2011 3:26 PM GMT
    If you're financially able, and after a reasonable period of inactivity of the affected region (allowing time to heal), you could always consider surgery or treatment to relax the muscles.

    If the doc says off for three weeks, I would say stay off it completely for 3-4 weeks. Then I would revert to what I was taught as a child in sports. Do significant leg stretches before any activity. Treat your injury tenderly for some time thereafter.
  • fitartistsf

    Posts: 638

    Mar 30, 2011 6:21 PM GMT
    I used to run a lot, until I got Planar Fasciiatus about 3 years ago. Even though I stretched the calves and arches for a good 15-20 mins. before running, the doctors I went to told me that it was insufficient, proper stretching that caused the injury. Took about a year and a half to basically heal. I still get pain there from time to time, still wear the special booty, that stretches the toes and feet back toward the shins, to bed occassionally....it will never heal 100%... you will most likely need to switch to a machine, the ellyptical type, which is much less stress on the knees and feet/arches... You will never fully recover to run as you did...
  • nicelyproport...

    Posts: 573

    Mar 30, 2011 6:41 PM GMT
    Awhile back I got PF. My orthopedist -- who works with many professional athletes and contributes to Men's Fitness -- told me PF can take a long time to heal. He ordered me not to run until I could do so pain-free. He might as well have told me to stop eating and sleeping. I typically run a lot: about 30 miles per week. But I was a good boy and did as I was told.

    Those were a long 2 months for me. The ellipse machine just wasn't the same. Like an addict going through withdrawal, I missed the high I got from running. The feeling of freedom. The sight of the other shirtless boys glistening in the summer sun. But taking the break did the trick. After the 2 months, I was back to running 7 miles at a stretch, totally pain-free.

    My advice: let your body heal.

  • Sparkycat

    Posts: 1064

    Mar 30, 2011 6:56 PM GMT
    There are videos on youtube showing how to tape your foot with athletic tape to take the strain off the plantar fascia. I did this, and it greatly reduced the heel pain.
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    Mar 30, 2011 7:12 PM GMT
    I got it about 10 years ago from frequent use of the stair master at the gym. There was actually a class-action suit against the company because so many people got PF. I don't know if they've made the machine less stressful. I've never gone near one since.

    I couldn't work out much for a few months. I used ice frequently and, of course, bought inserts for my shoes. After 2 months, I was fine.

    The elliptical, by the way, also can cause PF, but it is less hazardous than the stair master or running. At least, that's what I've been told.

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    Mar 30, 2011 7:38 PM GMT
    I've dealt with what I thought was plantar fasciitis and it's terrible. Plantar fasciitis is a way overdiagnosed condition because there are a bunch of different muscle tendons that run through the bottom of my foot inflammation of anyone can cause pain at the bottom of the foot. The muscles and tendons lie beneath the plantar fascia which is nothing more that a broad, thick piece of connective tissue that runs down the bottom of the foot.

    This is a really simple and cheap treatment protocol that I've used.

    1. Buy a lacrosse ball. Every night when you go to bed and every morning when you wake up, roll with the lacrosse ball with about as much weight on the leg as it takes to get to about a 5 or 6 in pain on a 10 pt scale. If you hear a little crunching, that's ok, it's the fascia loosening up which is exactly what you want as the accumulated scar tissue is what makes the condition worse.

    2. Stretch your calve muscles, you have gastrocnemius and you also have soleus. Do not stretch too deeply, just enough to get some resistance and then hold for about a minute.

    3. Take an old towel, lay it on the floor, and gather it with your toes. this will help strengthen the muscles which are contributing to the issue, plus it just feels good. To me at least.

    4. Biofreeze or anything similar is a GREAT product. Before a run, use it on your calves and feet and I think you'll notice a huge difference.

    5. Watch heel striking too, if you land with your foot hyperextended, dorsiflex, that can cause problems. If you're a bad heel striker it takes a little time and trial and error to neutralize your foot strike.

    Good luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 30, 2011 8:38 PM GMT
    There has been a lot of good advice so far. Definitely listen to your body. And maybe see a good Orthopedic.

    I had PF in the late 90's from teaching Step classes. It finally took two Cortisone shots in my heel for the pain to completely go away.

    Good luck.
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    Mar 30, 2011 8:43 PM GMT
    I have a long history as a distance runner. In the 1990s I had bouts with plantar fasciitis on both heels, sequentially. In both cases, while cortisone shots made the pain go away temporarily, the relief was only temporary.

    What did it? Taping the foot with athletic (adhesive) tape. The taping is designed to restrict the flexing of the heel relative to the arch. In both cases the problem began to immediately abate....and then disappeared completely, never to return.
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    Mar 31, 2011 12:21 AM GMT
    I had bilateral PF for almost 2 years.Don't waste your money on rehab. Whether you like it or not you'll just have to stop all things that aggravate the condition. Especially when you know you have a chronic case.

    If you keep running, you keep micro tearing your Plantar Fascia and causing inflamation.(If you feel actual tearing you're in serious trouble) Here are some tips.

    I know you already have them, but for others don't buy the expensive supports the Podiatrist wants to sell you. Your foot will never want to go without them again. For extra support there are some great options at your local pharmacy. Not the ones that are just foam, they have to have a hard arch support. Buy a few pairs and put them in all the shoes you wear. We want to get back to as normal a PF ligament as prior to the overuse injury.Not have to wear PF supports for the reat of our lives. How depressing.

    Never walk without shoes on. Not to the toilet in the middle of the night,not to the fridge while an ad is on tv, NEVER. Get some orthopedic flip flops for around the house and in the shower. Many on the market these days.

    Wear PF support bands or splints to bed. Keeps the Plantar Fasica strecthed during the night and helps stop the sharp pain in the mornings. These things feel great,instant relief. Some brands can be uncomfortable during the night. So try all the different brands on instore. Stay away from brands that get their support from just wrapping around your ankle. The longer the better.

    Massage your foot whenever you're watching TV, etc. Even better get someone else to do it. Be firm and take your time. You can't do any damage.

    Heat is great after spending time on your feet. After a hard day apply heat packs or have a hot foot soak.

    You can learn how to tape your own foot this will help with pain during your night work. No taping for running. No running at all.

    Try to avoid hills and uneven ground,even while walking. (This means wooded trails)

    Stretch all foot, leg and bum muscles, three time a day. And spend some time doing it. I would take 30 minutes, sometimes longer.

    Take anti-inflammatory medication, at higher doses for a few weeks.(unless they upset your stomach).

    If you've never had steroid injections, it may be time to give them ago. They can work like magic. It must be given under ultrasound to obtain the best results. After the injection, you'll think your 100%, but you're not. If you jump back into running or whatever expect sore feet the mext morning. Keep up with all of the above and take things very slowly.

    Recurring PF is all to common,but if you're hell bent on running through this,all you'll do is continue on your chronic way. Putting up with this injury for 3 years is way too long. I think it's time to get serious about getting better. Just to make things clear, we know that running as part of you recovery program isn't working for you. So if you still think running around the woods this spring and summer is going to help your recovery from Plantar Fasciitis you're just wrong. Many people who experiance PF pain see it come and go over a short period of time. You like me for whatever reason have to put up with this pain for a much longer period of time. Most chronic suffers are middle aged,overweight women and neither of us fit that description. Sorry I don't want to run your life. It's just I know your pain and know your frustration and I want to see you get better. I hope you get well soon.

    Good luck.
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    Mar 31, 2011 1:32 AM GMT
    It never really goes away.. You may have to find another form of cardio. I have a water bottle that I've let freeze, at night while watching TV I lay it on the floor and roll it under my foot till I cant handle it anymore. I am also on two prescriptions Nabumetone and Voltaren Gel.
    Good luck.
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    Mar 31, 2011 1:54 AM GMT
    Hi Redbull:

    I am going to be the voice of dissent here having suffer plantar fascitis all my life I have tried everything or pretty much everything that has stated above in this forum with no avail. I even have gone to a sports medicine podiatrist prior to a marathon and he told me pretty much what advised had been stated above.

    One credit that I do give him for getting the pain under control prior to a marathon that I had and resting of my right foot was the use of the Straussburg sock. I used this in the evenings while resting or watching TV prior to bed which helped tremendously at night, but most important in the morning prior to waking up the pain started to subside, but not entirely gone away.

    sock.jpg



    With that being said, I am not saying this will work for you, but for me it did. I still use insert for work, but have gradually changed to barefoot vibrams running or minimal arch support for running shoes. I know it sounds absolutely CRAZY because we have been taught or inoculated by the market media to believe that support or additional cushioning of the shoe was the most important to prevent foot injuries. However, the main stream running shoe did not really got is real innovation since the 1970's with Nike coming on board first, prior to that most of our running shoes were flat, and yet we have not see the amount of injuries as we have today. So, I started running with the vibrams and at home using a flat loafer with no support, its been a couple of months and I do not have plantar fascitis pain anymore, which for the first time in so many years is great and awesome.

    Just wanted to point another alternative, the best option is to read the other side of the argument to see if its an option.
  • yogadudeSEATT...

    Posts: 373

    Mar 31, 2011 2:15 AM GMT
    Acupuncture healed my PF in about 5 treatments.
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    Mar 31, 2011 3:08 AM GMT
    Thanks a lot for all the good advice... I've been running in spite of my PT. I guess I'll stop for a while. It's going to be tough, especially with the warm weather coming.