Weights from other gyms

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2011 1:42 AM GMT
    I sure hope I don't sound like an idiot but when I go to other gyms the weight on the different machines and even the dumbbells feel heavier eventhough they are the same weight (as in pounds).

    The YMCA I go to doesn't have the newest equiptment like the other gyms I go too but just seem to me that a 25 lb weight should feel the same no matter where I go. Or do they acutally lose weight with age or is it all in my head?
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    Mar 31, 2011 3:35 AM GMT
    If the grips are different shapes or sizes, or even with the way the weight is distributed, the dumbbell or whatever machine may very well feel heavier or lighter. My gym has 2 different sets of dumbbells and I definitely prefer one over the other.
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    Mar 31, 2011 3:41 AM GMT
    OK I'm gonna risk sounding like a nerd. But here it goes.

    Apparently weight of objects changes depending on the distance to the center of the earth (due to gravity differences), even though the MASS has stayed constant. So if you are lifting on the roof of a high-rise building, the weights are going to feel lighter compared to when you're lifting in a basement. It also changes based on the lattitude of the earth. If you're closer to the equator, the objects are lighter and if you're closer to the poles the objects are heavier. So under similar conditions (e.g., ground floor), bench pressing 200lb in Alaska would feel heavier than bench pressing the same 200lbs in Hawaii. I believe the difference is about 1.5% which should be noticeable.

    Of course if you're talking about similar conditions (i.e., same cities, same altitude), then yeah it's in your head.
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    Mar 31, 2011 3:55 AM GMT
    You're right I've discovered the same thing. I think its the material and brand difference of the weights being used.
  • TheAlchemixt

    Posts: 2294

    Mar 31, 2011 4:01 AM GMT
    Yeah, I agree.
    I think its the same thing with clothes. For one brand I may be a small and the other brand I may be a medium.. Or for one brand I may wear a size 29 jeans and for another brand I may wear a size 30!

    I also think it may have something to do with how the weight is distributed on the barbell or how the handles may be shaped.
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    Mar 31, 2011 4:05 AM GMT
    machines use levers
    some levers are different

    case closed

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    Mar 31, 2011 4:06 AM GMT
    as for dumbbells... thats probably just your head
  • NerdLifter

    Posts: 1509

    Mar 31, 2011 4:36 AM GMT
    Cityaznguy saidOK I'm gonna risk sounding like a nerd. But here it goes.

    Apparently weight of objects changes depending on the distance to the center of the earth (due to gravity differences), even though the MASS has stayed constant. So if you are lifting on the roof of a high-rise building, the weights are going to feel lighter compared to when you're lifting in a basement. It also changes based on the lattitude of the earth. If you're closer to the equator, the objects are lighter and if you're closer to the poles the objects are heavier. So under similar conditions (e.g., ground floor), bench pressing 200lb in Alaska would feel heavier than bench pressing the same 200lbs in Hawaii. I believe the difference is about 1.5% which should be noticeable.

    Of course if you're talking about similar conditions (i.e., same cities, same altitude), then yeah it's in your head.


    Ok, I have to respond to this. If you knew the equation of gravitational attraction, then you would know elevation and latitude will NOT affect in any *meaningful* way how "heavy" the weight is. It would be beyond negligible.

    If we were on top of Mount Everest, 25 lbs would technically weight 24.96 lbs. That is a 0.16% difference. Really negligible. You cannot "feel" that kind of change even if you were on the farthest point from Earth's center
    (which is not Everest but it is well known).

    Read up on the Gravitational Constant of the Universe as well as orbit free-fall. If the weight was in orbit, the Earth would still be pulling on it with more than the majority of the force it felt on Earth's surface.

    The more likely reason why it feels heavier is likely due to what both Photosrus above me and Paul below me said. Or if this is not a point mass such as a dumbell, but rather a machine/lever/cable, as track_boi pointed out, depending on the configuration of the machine you may have to do more or less work to move the same weight due to a change in the moment-arms and pull force over a distance assistance. All elementary static mechanics.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2011 4:41 AM GMT
    If the grips are shaped differently, then you'll be using slightly different stabilizer muscles to hold it, thus making the same amount of weight feel different.
  • starboard5

    Posts: 969

    Mar 31, 2011 4:48 AM GMT
    I would think that free weights should all be the same. The machines? I never look at the numbers as indicative of actual weight; they're just a relative gauge of increments.
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    Mar 31, 2011 5:02 AM GMT
    Studinprogress said
    Cityaznguy saidOK I'm gonna risk sounding like a nerd. But here it goes.

    Apparently weight of objects changes depending on the distance to the center of the earth (due to gravity differences), even though the MASS has stayed constant. So if you are lifting on the roof of a high-rise building, the weights are going to feel lighter compared to when you're lifting in a basement. It also changes based on the lattitude of the earth. If you're closer to the equator, the objects are lighter and if you're closer to the poles the objects are heavier. So under similar conditions (e.g., ground floor), bench pressing 200lb in Alaska would feel heavier than bench pressing the same 200lbs in Hawaii. I believe the difference is about 1.5% which should be noticeable.

    Of course if you're talking about similar conditions (i.e., same cities, same altitude), then yeah it's in your head.


    Ok, I have to respond to this. If you knew the equation of gravitational attraction, then you would know elevation and latitude will NOT affect in any *meaningful* way how "heavy" the weight is. It would be beyond negligible.

    If we were on top of Mount Everest, 25 lbs would technically weight 24.96 lbs. That is a 0.16% difference. Really negligible. You cannot "feel" that kind of change even if you were on the farthest point from Earth's center
    (which is not Everest but it is well known).

    Read up on the Gravitational Constant of the Universe as well as orbit free-fall. If the weight was in orbit, the Earth would still be pulling on it with more than the majority of the force it felt on Earth's surface.

    The more likely reason why it feels heavier is likely due to what both Photosrus above me and Paul below me said. Or if this is not a point mass such as a dumbell, but rather a machine/lever/cable, as track_boi pointed out, depending on the configuration of the machine you may have to do more or less work to move the same weight due to a change in the moment-arms and pull force over a distance assistance. All elementary static mechanics.


    OK I was a bit off on the percentage so thx for the correction. But the basic idea was still right though. Oh yes I do agree on the grip thing as well icon_smile.gif

    http://askville.amazon.com/person-weigh-higher-altitude/AnswerViewer.do?requestId=2944115
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2011 5:03 AM GMT
    My gym sucks. All the barbells are different thicknesses, material, and weight. And most of the time they're bent.
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    May 06, 2011 7:49 AM GMT
    cityaznguy saidOK I'm gonna risk sounding like a nerd. But here it goes.

    Apparently weight of objects changes depending on the distance to the center of the earth (due to gravity differences), even though the MASS has stayed constant. So if you are lifting on the roof of a high-rise building, the weights are going to feel lighter compared to when you're lifting in a basement. It also changes based on the lattitude of the earth. If you're closer to the equator, the objects are lighter and if you're closer to the poles the objects are heavier. So under similar conditions (e.g., ground floor), bench pressing 200lb in Alaska would feel heavier than bench pressing the same 200lbs in Hawaii. I believe the difference is about 1.5% which should be noticeable.

    Of course if you're talking about similar conditions (i.e., same cities, same altitude), then yeah it's in your head.


    YUP..Your a NERD..LOL.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2011 7:56 AM GMT
    I thought that as metal aged it lost density and ended up turning into cotton candy and then clouds.

    icon_eek.gif
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    May 06, 2011 8:02 AM GMT
    xrichx said And most of the time they're bent.


    Yeah the longer bars at my gym have a bend. I have this horrifying fantasy in my head the plates'll fall off the ends because of it (despite them being secured with collars).
  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    May 06, 2011 8:06 AM GMT
    track_boi saidmachines use levers
    some levers are different

    case closed



    Addendum:

    Lever systems within physics suggests that the force necessary to lift a load is reduced when one or more levers are used; size, distance and number of the pivots within the lever system can reduce the overall newton force necessary to move a fixed set weight.

    Half the reason why many favour free weights over machines, that and you exercises supporting muscle groups, stability and all that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2011 9:37 AM GMT
    local_g.png

    Though if you can feel a difference of ½% from workout to workout with a major flight in-between you are a freak.
  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    May 06, 2011 10:39 AM GMT
    That guys bursting out laughing in the middle of a silent office, full of mood workers. That's me.
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    May 06, 2011 11:10 AM GMT
    Kenneth_w saidI sure hope I don't sound like an idiot but when I go to other gyms the weight on the different machines and even the dumbbells feel heavier eventhough they are the same weight (as in pounds).

    The YMCA I go to doesn't have the newest equiptment like the other gyms I go too but just seem to me that a 25 lb weight should feel the same no matter where I go. Or do they acutally lose weight with age or is it all in my head?


    omg I think about this too lol. Some of the machines in my gym really annoy me because they use this conversion system based on a "155 pound" person so if you aren't that magic fucking weight you never know what the weight is.

    Most machines are designed for the person to sit in a specific position and that position varies across all machines so there will always be variation in the exact area the force is exerted upon.

    A 25lb free weight should always feel the same though..