Contact Lens "Technology." This is it? Really?

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    Apr 02, 2011 11:14 PM GMT
    So, I've had better than perfect vision my whole life (until now.) I've been getting by with those lame drug store readers for reading and such. Now all my t-shirts have this indentation from where those stupid glass hang when I'm not using them. I sure as hell don't want to wear bifocal glasses because I look like a total dork in glasses. So now I've been fitted with "multi-focal" contact lens. I don't have a problem wearing them because most of the time they're pretty comfortable. But now my distance vision is all blurry and when I'm reading there's this double vision thing going on. Is this as far as this "technology" has come? I'd love to hear other people's experience.
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    Apr 03, 2011 2:50 AM GMT
    TheGuyNextDoor saidInteresting that you say this....! I too just got fitted for a pair of Air Optix Multi Focal extended wear lens. Love them!
    There is a secret to getting your distance back.
    Wear only one. It allows you to still be able to read the computer or a book and the naked eye does all the distance work.
    If the reading part is not spot on,, it sounds like your Dr. did like mine and started you out on the Low magnification.
    You may need to be bumped up to the Medium or High lens to make reading spot on.
    Experiment with using only one. Be sure and try one for an entire day and then the next day, switch eyes so you can find your dominate eye.
    If you get it backwards you'll have eye strain. The Air Optix are fairly new and I can't really feel that I have it in.
    I forgot the last 2 nights they were still in, and slept in em' !
    I did how ever take it out when I remembered to let is soak for an hour or so in the saline solution and get rid of the protein build up.
    http://www.optix-now.com/ciba-vision-lenses/air-optix-aqua-multifocal/78-air-optix-aqua-multifocal-overview.html
    air-optix-aqua-multifocal.jpg
    I've loved not putting on glasses to see the computer or in meetings at work to read the paper work!


    Actually, what I didn't mention is that the first thing the doctor tried was the mono-contact lens. I felt sea sick constantly! After the 5th day, it was either take the fucker out or throw up.......I took it out. The doctor told me he wasn't surprised because most people are not able to adjust to it.
  • 2PecanDeBeurr...

    Posts: 302

    Apr 03, 2011 2:56 AM GMT
    Studying now as an Ophthalmic dispensing(eyeglasses/contact lens) student, it sounds like your contact lens are not in curve with your corneal.
    The distance portion of your lens is not crossing at a focal point causing aberration(blurry) and the near portion(reading-lower eye view) does not have the appropiate add power.
    Go to the optician where you got your contact lens, explain the experience. Any delay will cause your eyes to adapt and may cause future damage to your eyes
    j.c.
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    Apr 03, 2011 4:04 AM GMT
    butterpecan2 saidStudying now as an Ophthalmic dispensing(eyeglasses/contact lens) student, it sounds like your contact lens are not in curve with your corneal.
    The distance portion of your lens is not crossing at a focal point causing aberration(blurry) and the near portion(reading-lower eye view) does not have the appropiate add power.
    Go to the optician where you got your contact lens, explain the experience. Any delay will cause your eyes to adapt and may cause future damage to your eyes
    j.c.


    Can having the lens in backwards cause this? I can't tell if they're in correctly. They look the same regardless of which direction they're flipped.
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    Apr 03, 2011 4:11 AM GMT
    Scruffypup saidSo, I've had better than perfect vision my whole life (until now.) I've been getting by with those lame drug store readers for reading and such. Now all my t-shirts have this indentation from where those stupid glass hang when I'm not using them. I sure as hell don't want to wear bifocal glasses because I look like a total dork in glasses. So now I've been fitted with "multi-focal" contact lens. I don't have a problem wearing them because most of the time they're pretty comfortable. But now my distance vision is all blurry and when I'm reading there's this double vision thing going on. Is this as far as this "technology" has come? I'd love to hear other people's experience.


    Just go get lasik surgery and be done with it. My cousin who had it about years ago swears by it. she has vision like a hawk
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    Apr 03, 2011 4:15 AM GMT
    There is a difference when you have them inside out. Its just very subtle. It took me almost a year before I could tell which was right.

    Put the lens in your palm and dispense saline onto it (a good amount). Helps rinse it off a little. Then take your pointer finger of the other hand and scoop it up. Hold it like a bowl on the finger tip and I usually hold it up to the light a bit. You can see if its perfectly round at the edge or not. If inside out you will have two flatter edges and round ends...like an oval race track.
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    Apr 03, 2011 4:15 AM GMT
    Blackguy4you said
    Scruffypup saidSo, I've had better than perfect vision my whole life (until now.) I've been getting by with those lame drug store readers for reading and such. Now all my t-shirts have this indentation from where those stupid glass hang when I'm not using them. I sure as hell don't want to wear bifocal glasses because I look like a total dork in glasses. So now I've been fitted with "multi-focal" contact lens. I don't have a problem wearing them because most of the time they're pretty comfortable. But now my distance vision is all blurry and when I'm reading there's this double vision thing going on. Is this as far as this "technology" has come? I'd love to hear other people's experience.


    Just go get lasik surgery and be done with it. My cousin who had it about years ago swears by it. she has vision like a hawk




    I don't think Lasik is an option if you only have trouble reading.
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    Apr 03, 2011 4:27 AM GMT
    BuckyBullet59 saidThere is a difference when you have them inside out. Its just very subtle. It took me almost a year before I could tell which was right.

    Put the lens in your palm and dispense saline onto it (a good amount). Helps rinse it off a little. Then take your pointer finger of the other hand and scoop it up. Hold it like a bowl on the finger tip and I usually hold it up to the light a bit. You can see if its perfectly round at the edge or not. If inside out you will have two flatter edges and round ends...like an oval race track.



    I noticed that today! So that can make you have the double vision thing?
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    Apr 03, 2011 5:13 AM GMT
    I never had it play with my vision like that, but everyones eyes are very different.

    At the least it will keep them a little more comfortable so you don't have to rip them out of your eyes!

    A note about the lasik...it only works on people with certain vision correction issues and only if your vision is not changing. Also, everyone's eyes change as they age, its natural, and there is nothing that any procedure can do to correct for it. Organs wear out, thats part of life!
  • Vaughn

    Posts: 1880

    Apr 03, 2011 5:26 AM GMT
    I'm 20:10, my Dad was too until, presbyopia set in. Gran has Macular Degeneration. At least my sight is still better than most people.
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    Apr 03, 2011 7:12 AM GMT
    The multifocal technology is just not all there yet. I tried it a couple of years ago and couldn't see at all - my brain just wouldn't focus in on the images. Then I tried gas perms, which were recommended for acuity if not comfort. They were a disaster on both counts. So I stuck with readers over regular contacts (Acuvue Oasys).

    A few months ago I tried the Air Optix and Acuvue for Presbyopia, both of which are pretty new designs. My vision in the Air Optix was 90+ %, but I was allergic to something in the lens, as my eyelids got really inflamed after a few day's wear. So I was left with the Acuvue , which are comfortable but I get only about 85% vision. Hard to read at middle distances, especially in dim light, and distance leaves a bit to be desired when my eyes are tired.

    But I still love them. No more readers at work, for restaurant menus, for playing games - only for reading in really dim light. I feel much younger, and love not having to keep track of all the readers.

    But as new brands come out and the technology continues to improve, I will try them. It will only get better.

    I suggest getting trial pairs of other brands and seeing if they suit you better.
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    Apr 03, 2011 1:59 PM GMT
    cold saidWhy not wear progressive lenses?


    Vanity. That answer, I understand. ;-)
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    Apr 03, 2011 3:32 PM GMT
    cold saidWhy not wear progressive lenses? They are like bifocals, but the prescription gradually shifts to reading so that you don't have a segmented section. They just look like ordinary single vision lenses and you won't have any distance vision issues.

    The two lighter shaded parts of the lens are areas where you vision won't be completely clear. Depending on the strength of your prescription and the quality of the lens, these might be as large as displayed or barely noticeable.
    progressive-lens.jpg?w=324&h=184

    IMO, you may as well get decent progressive lenses and then, if you feel you need it, buy some cheap reading glasses from the chemist for comfort when you're going to be reading for hours.



    We discussed that. They cost around 800 bucks. Yikes.
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    Apr 03, 2011 5:43 PM GMT
    I bought some progressive lenses for my employee's safety glasses. From some internet outfit, they were about $100. Neither of them complained about the lenses, but hey, they were free.

    I'm still at the stage where when I need the cheaters, it takes more time to find them than it does to get better light or just throw whatever I'm trying to see under the dissecting microscope.

    (It was "39dollarglasses.com" and they never let up on the spam. I guess that they make them in China or something.)
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    Apr 03, 2011 6:25 PM GMT
    SleepyFisherman said
    Scruffypup said

    We discussed that. They cost around 800 bucks. Yikes.

    ↑ The sole reason that I only replace mine every 3-4 yrs.


    And what happens if you lose one or it gets damaged?
  • dtx1

    Posts: 155

    Apr 03, 2011 6:57 PM GMT
    I've worn soft contacts to improve distance vision for 30+ years. Like many, when I reached my mid-40s I also developed presbyopia (close range distance issues). When it got to the point where my arms no longer extended away from my body enough to read a restaurant menu, I opted for a pair of drugstore readers but did not like being dependent on them or toting them everywhere.

    I discussed various options with my eye doctor including the more expensive lenses mentioned in this thread. He suggested an older and much less expensive compromise solution he referred to as 'mono-vision' in which a person wears a lens in one eye for distance, and a different power lens in the other eye tuned for close up vision.

    I tried 'mono-vision' and initially hated it. But after about a week, I got used to it and now love it. After an brief period of visual confusion, my brain eventually began to automatically shift focus from one eye to the other depending on what I was looking at. I rarely if ever consciously notice the difference and can now see both at a distance and close up with no readers and using only inexpensive soft contact lenses that are very comfortable to wear. Mono-vision is a compromise solution and is not for everyone, but I thought I'd mention it.
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    Apr 03, 2011 6:59 PM GMT
    Macular degeneration SUCKS
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    Apr 03, 2011 9:37 PM GMT
    I thought the 800 bucks quote was for progressive glasses, not multifocal contacts.

    I don't know where you are, but it doesn't cost $800 to get good progressive glasses here (and this is a high-cost area) - if you shop around. I have terrible vision - -10.5 diopters with glasses, with a +2.0 add - and stylish Japanese frames with high index lenses most recently cost me under $400. There's a lot of profit built into opticians' numbers - ask for a discount and don't feel the need to go to the highest-end shop.

    Multifocal contacts are pricier than single vision contacts, but you can buy them off the internet after you get fitted with a trial pair by your eye care professional and get a prescription. In the US, opthamologists and optometrists are required by law to give you the prescription so you can buy separately. Air Optix are monthly disposables, Acuvues are bi-weekly disposables.