Suicides Now More Plentiful Than Traffic Deaths

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    Apr 04, 2011 4:09 PM GMT
    Some good news for a change (and in no small part because of safety technologies - which is why this is filed here). Well sort of. That suicide part is a bit depressing.

    http://www.freakonomics.com/2011/04/04/suicides-now-more-plentiful-than-traffic-deaths/

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) early projections, the number of traffic fatalities fell three percent between 2009 and 2010, from 33,808 to 32,788. Since 2005, fatalities have dropped 25 percent, from a total of 43,510 fatalities in 2005. The same estimates also project that the fatality rate will be the lowest recorded since 1949, with 1.09 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled, down from the 1.13 fatality rate for 2009. The decrease in fatalities for 2010 occurred despite an estimated increase of nearly 21 billion miles in national vehicle miles traveled.

    A regional breakdown showed the greatest drop in fatalities occurred in the Pacific Northwest states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Alaska, where they dropped by 12 percent. Arizona, California and Hawaii had the next steepest decline, nearly 11 percent.
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    Apr 04, 2011 8:11 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidSome good news for a change (and in no small part because of safety technologies - which is why this is filed here). Well sort of. That suicide part is a bit depressing.

    http://www.freakonomics.com/2011/04/04/suicides-now-more-plentiful-than-traffic-deaths/

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) early projections, the number of traffic fatalities fell three percent between 2009 and 2010, from 33,808 to 32,788. Since 2005, fatalities have dropped 25 percent, from a total of 43,510 fatalities in 2005. The same estimates also project that the fatality rate will be the lowest recorded since 1949, with 1.09 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled, down from the 1.13 fatality rate for 2009. The decrease in fatalities for 2010 occurred despite an estimated increase of nearly 21 billion miles in national vehicle miles traveled.

    A regional breakdown showed the greatest drop in fatalities occurred in the Pacific Northwest states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Alaska, where they dropped by 12 percent. Arizona, California and Hawaii had the next steepest decline, nearly 11 percent.


    I know traffic deaths are going down here in Wisconsin because of stricter enforcement of our seat belt law and also more enforcement of our law against texting while driving and also drinking and driving.