Target Cardio before contest


  • Dec 28, 2006 9:39 PM GMT
    I've been communicating with some "pro" bodybuilders and one says that he's always had good success with cardio in the AM before eating anything. This would be moderate cardio without bring in any major muscle groups. He states that 25=35 mins is optimal for targeting the fat around the waistline.
    Has anyone else had this same routine told to them - or has anyone tried this and gotten good results?
    I'm now over 50 and the waistline is giving me problems. 5'10", 221lbs (11¿).
    Thanks for any information you guys can offer me.
    Muscle Daddy JIm
    maturemsclbldr@aol.com
  • art_smass

    Posts: 960

    Dec 31, 2006 8:30 PM GMT
    Some people can work out on an empty stomach and some can't, so that shouldn't be your primary goal. I find that I can put the most into a cardio workout around 4:00 in afternoon. I talk to people who can get out of bed and do it. I know people who can do it right after dinner. There are no times when you'll "burn more fat", so I suggest picking a time when you can get the most out of it. If you put more energy into it, you'll have greater results. There is a lot of contrary advice out there, especially coming from a body building/diet supplementing perspective, but if you do it when you feel good doing it, you're more likely to have a positive outcome.
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    Dec 31, 2006 8:53 PM GMT
    As a competitor, I do cardio early in the morning as it works better for me to lose BF- on an empty stomach with some thermogenics.
    For most guys, that are not competitors, just doing the cardio every day and being consistent is the key. In addition, you must modify your diet in conjunction with the cardio. That means things like modifying carb intake, looking at reducing or eliminating things like bread, potatoes, dairy. Again everyone is different but you must address both in order to be successful in losing body fat.
    My two cents...
    Ric
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    Feb 14, 2007 10:07 PM GMT
    LatinMuscle2000 has the right idea.

    Here's a few more items: If you are in late middle age, you should see your doctor about HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy) as well as watching your diet, and doing regular cardio exercise. If you're beyond about 28, or so, your testosterone has been declining, and, likely, testosterone will greatly improve your body composition, provide a general sense of well being and help to prevent a number of aging diseases, as well a protect your heart. If your GH (Growth Hormone) is low, you should be adjusting it up, too, so that you stay lean, prevent aging disease, have lower blood pressure, maintain better skin, and muscle tone, as well as have an improved sense of well being. HRT can both improve the quality of your life, as well as add years to it.

    For the last few few years there's been some good science done that exploits the many benefits of the use of anabolics, and growth hormone. Almost all of which directly in contradiction to the whole AAS is bad misinformation campaign.

    If your doctor won't consider HRT, you should find a different doctor. Any doctor in the know will have no issues putting you on HRT therapy.
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    Feb 14, 2007 10:13 PM GMT
    Additionally, besides the HRT, you'd do yourself a service to stay away from a lot of the junk in the health food market. While a few things work (creatine, protein, nitric oxide, coenzyme Q10), lots of the nutrition market snuff is nothing more than snake oil. Find a good GP, or geriatric, doctor, and it'll both be cheaper, and tons more effective. And... cardio while just above ketosis, or slightly into, will be more effective than when your blood sugar is high. That's all about cell osmosis, insulin, and so on. Cardio on low blood sugar will GENERALLY metabolize more fat...BUT...not if you are in severe ketosis (feast or famine response) which will burn muscle mass, instead of lipids. Fairly low blood sugar, interval cardio training, consistency, and a low to moderate fat diet, along with adequate calories are what's needed to get lean. To little calories, and your body goes into famine mode. To many calories, and your body will burn carbs instead of fat.
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    Mar 04, 2007 3:41 PM GMT
    I completed last year, placing 4th in the masters (over 35) ... Morning is best! With a good target rate and good ole SWEAT!

    Just started my diet for the same contest, this year I only need to drop around 15 pounds ... so look for me on the treadmill, cycle and stair master every monrning -- say HI (If I can catch my breathe i will say hi too) ...

    Good Luck!
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    Mar 04, 2007 3:42 PM GMT
    And it assist you more --- when is your contest, current weight, age etc ...
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    Mar 17, 2007 1:44 AM GMT
    LOL. We old folks and our cardio.

    If you're in Texas, you might want to catch The Europa Super Show, August 11, at The Dallas Convention Center.

    Master's is fun, eh, Prick? Hee, hee.
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    Mar 17, 2007 1:45 AM GMT
    First thing in the morning. 40G of protein, no carbs or lows carbs. Intervals on THE STAIRS (ICK). SUCKS, but no one loses with striations in their ass!
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    Mar 17, 2007 2:53 AM GMT
    I like the Masters Division. I turned 41 in December, but I will tell you this- the Masters is not what it used to be. More often than not, these guys are in better condition than the younger guys and sometimes its rough.
    I have done the Europa show some years back- it was a fun show and Ed and Betty Pariso run an efficient show.
    This is week 3 of dieting for me- I only got up to 255 this year(as opposed to 275 in other years) so I don't have to lose as much this season. As you get older it gets harder and harder to prep for a show- the body just isn't as resilient. But, I love the challenge and it keeps me going..
    Ric
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    Mar 17, 2007 2:55 AM GMT
    BTW,
    I only have two cardio options-
    1. Gaunlet(this is the most grueling cardio- it sucks big time, but really ties in the hams/back side of the quad.

    2. Treadmill- 12.5 degree incline at 2.9-3.0 mph while squeezing your ass.
    I have to really have some fast music to keep me going on this option...

    Ric
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    Aug 11, 2007 7:56 PM GMT
    Chucky, surely you're not implying that the stairs promote striations in the butt? SPOT REDUCTION?

    Say it isn't so!
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Aug 11, 2007 9:09 PM GMT
    was going to say, there's no such thing as "spot reduction".

    also there's a few holes in these methods. You have to work aerobicly to burn fat...period. and if you're breathing that hard where you can not carry a casual conversation, you are definitely burning carbs, not fat.

    your body either burns carbs CHO or fat, never protein unless you have 0% body fat...even for us endurance athletes, we all have fat to burn. protein is used for building muscle or recovery to rebuild from lifting or intense cardio training of 90+mins. CHO is your body's prefered source of fuel and with in the first 15-20 mins, the only way to tap in to FAT is lowering intensity, so it's more of 50/50 fuel mixture, and also longer duration.

    good luck!
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    Aug 12, 2007 4:45 AM GMT
    Thanks for chiming in, Psych.... catabolizing muscle (and other protein stores - like organs) is a definite problem.

    L-Gluatamine to the (partial) rescue... 5gms before & after workouts have been shown to reduce catabolism.

    J.
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Aug 13, 2007 2:29 PM GMT
    either my text books, professors and creditable nutritions are wrong. your body will only use protein as energy source when there is no CHO or FAT available,a last resort. it doesn't look like anyone here is suffering from an eating disorders.

    also no one ever mentioned calore reduction as well. consuming less then 350 kcals a day, will also help in fat reduction is safe.

    no ever mentioned Resting Metobolic Rate?

    these threads are good and bad. most are full of hearse info and not from professionals and even some professionals are clueless.

    www.nasnutrition.com has a extremly good program for nutrition.

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    Aug 13, 2007 2:36 PM GMT
    US - equally credible nutritionists dispute that. Let's not get into a citation war about it - but we all know that catabolism happens. Muscle tissue is constantly being broken down and replaced. The question is, how much, why, and what might be done to reduce it.
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    Aug 13, 2007 3:41 PM GMT
    Ustriathlete...

    The body IS constantly breaking down small amounts of protien. It is the ratio that is important...

    Just go take a look at many very sick patients... You can still have some fat, but the muscles can be wasting away from sickness, poor nutritional intake (many of these patients have no appetite), muscle disuse, etc... In some cases, you will see complete wasting of muscles but the patients still has alot of intra-abdominal fat reserve, as in AIDs patients. Only the very very sick are completely without much fat or lean body tissue...

    The biochemistry of energy ultilization is not just as simple as the Kreb Cycle or glycolisis, it is a lot more dynmaic and complex when you mix in the body's endocrine and neurological responses into play... You do not need to get to 0% body fat before protien is used for energy, far from that...
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Aug 13, 2007 11:07 PM GMT
    yes...reduction of kcals!

    still no comment about RMR? interesting.
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    Aug 13, 2007 11:16 PM GMT
    I would take the advice of PsychExerSci..
    He is a physiologist, getting his Phd in the field, spcialzing in celluar physiology during and post exercises..

    To just rely on a scale as generalized as RMR BUT without understanding the actual biopathway how one arrives at a value of any scale is too simplistic.

    The RMR may not be a constant value as it must be affected by the person's endocrinine and neurological state. How it is measured is oerly simplistic. Fluctuating changing protein neurotransmiters, hormones, etc, can have a lot of impact on such values.

    It is as simplistic as someon who is using your weight to determine your state of cardiovascular health. While the ratio of lean body mass, blood lab values, sex, exercise background, and other co-morbidities all have an affect on the overall final picture...

    I will let a specialist such as PsychExerSci to answer the above quesition about RMR.

    A nutritionist is not as specialized as a celluar exercist physiologist..