New to Kettlebells

  • chgobuzz1

    Posts: 155

    Apr 17, 2011 7:25 AM GMT
    Just started a Kettlebell class. So far it has been challenging. Im curious how others have been able to progress that are new to Kettelbells ? What difference have you seen in results over time ? Is it just for core or is muscle gain possible ?

    I also find it easier to balance if do I do it barefoot versus in gym shoes. I see most people in the class either barefoot or in Vibrams. The instructor wears Vibrams. Is barefoot the best way to do this class ? I do like doing it barefoot but have to be careful about dropping one I guess on my foot LOL. Who else does this class barefoot ?
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    Apr 17, 2011 8:51 AM GMT
    I've been KB classes for a while on and off and it's great. personally for me, i could look better doing isolated weights, but KBs allows the whole body to be engaged while working out (which is what i'm after) - i.e. more focus on function strength. great for back, engaging core. doesn't matter what footwear.
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    Apr 17, 2011 2:08 PM GMT
    Absoleutely love kettle bells. There is definitely potential for muscle growth. I personally like them in a circuit class better than just working with them, though have done both. Have never seen abyone do them barefoot, but again I mostly do a circuit class that requires a variety of movements. Feel free to send me a msg if you have any questions.
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    Apr 18, 2011 9:27 PM GMT
    chgobuzz1 said
    I also find it easier to balance if do I do it barefoot versus in gym shoes. I see most people in the class either barefoot or in Vibrams. The instructor wears Vibrams. Is barefoot the best way to do this class ? I do like doing it barefoot but have to be careful about dropping one I guess on my foot LOL. Who else does this class barefoot ?


    I haven't taken a specific KB class, but when we did KB work at my CrossFit gym, I always preferred doing them barefoot or wearing my Vibrams. I had greater stability in my feet/legs. As far as I know, I haven't seen or heard about anyone who has dropped a kettlebell on their foot. icon_lol.gif
  • chgobuzz1

    Posts: 155

    Apr 22, 2011 5:58 AM GMT
    Tonight I did the class barefoot as did 2 others. One guy wore his Vibrams as he usually does. It has taught me how to use my feet more effectivley to balance and control my leg movements so I will be doing it barefoot from now on. My foot muscles seem to eb developing more some how. Its great finding a workout where they allow you to be barefoot icon_smile.gif

    The instructor so far has wore either Vibrams or very thin soled shoes. Maybe he feels he has a dress code or something to uphold. I will have to ask him.

    It is teaching me all about core and to have greater movement which is great.
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    Apr 22, 2011 6:28 AM GMT
    I love Kettlebells, and I am a Kettlebell Specialist Level 1..[Kettlebell Academy with Ajamu!!!]of al the Fitness related things I've done as a Trainer, it was the absolute toughest..
    Loved it!!!
  • suedeheadscot

    Posts: 1130

    Apr 22, 2011 6:39 AM GMT
    I don't have a kettlebell class over here but wish we did - I get my gym instructor to work me for 5 mins using a kettlebell on arms/abs. This is something I've just recently started and they hurt like feck!!
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    Apr 22, 2011 6:57 AM GMT
    I have started with my trainer, and its amazing so far another tool to engage the whole body and definitely workout better your core as well as other muscles groups. The only thing that I have to get accustomed is to always engage your core, muscles, and hips, and not your back. Otherwise, without proper form, my back start to get soared, so its just an issue on understanding the different exercises and correct form, which I am sure I will get better.
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    Apr 22, 2011 7:45 AM GMT
    Amazing what you learn during the wee hours of the morning. I see these in the gym but had no idea what they were really for. Well, I try something new tomorrow after watching a bunch of vids regarding what to do. I hope old people can use these without getting injured too badly.
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    Apr 22, 2011 11:42 AM GMT
    everyone can use kettlebells is performed correctly and progression is slow and inline with your capabilities.

    Start simple, a two handed swing, nothing more.

    For Chgobuzz, Yes, muscle gain is more then possible. Dumbbells are not special everything you do with them you can pretty much do with a kettlebell and then do a whole lot more
  • Ironman4U

    Posts: 738

    Apr 22, 2011 11:52 AM GMT
    I started doing work with kettlebells a couple of years ago. My trainer at the time was really into them and so he taught me. Proper form is critical and takes a bit of practice to master. But once you do, it's like riding a bike.

    Great for functional strength, engaging your core and working your whole body. Also nice to mix it up from the usual weights and machines at the gym. A little muscle confusion is great for adding strength and building muscle.
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    Apr 22, 2011 3:26 PM GMT
    Rick Carranza has a good amount of meat on him. *drool*



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    Apr 22, 2011 4:40 PM GMT
    wildtype87 saidRick Carranza has a good amount of meat on him. *drool*





    And so do you!
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    Apr 22, 2011 4:43 PM GMT
    lilTanker saideveryone can use kettlebells is performed correctly and progression is slow and inline with your capabilities.

    Start simple, a two handed swing, nothing more.

    For Chgobuzz, Yes, muscle gain is more then possible. Dumbbells are not special everything you do with them you can pretty much do with a kettlebell and then do a whole lot more


    I have rotator cuff issues from overtraining. I wonder if this will help or hurt. I half think this may help. Thoughts?
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    Apr 22, 2011 5:03 PM GMT
    I've incorporated kettle bell training and really like how it causes the whole body to engage in the movements. Plus swings get my heat rate up in just a minute or so. It seems like it is good for total conditioning and cardio although I don't know whether you can add all that much mass with them.
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    Apr 22, 2011 5:58 PM GMT
    I've just started using kettlebells in an Iron Camp I'm taking. They're a bitch, but more fun than other workouts.
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    Apr 23, 2011 12:16 AM GMT
    OneGeezer said
    lilTanker saideveryone can use kettlebells is performed correctly and progression is slow and inline with your capabilities.

    Start simple, a two handed swing, nothing more.

    For Chgobuzz, Yes, muscle gain is more then possible. Dumbbells are not special everything you do with them you can pretty much do with a kettlebell and then do a whole lot more


    I have rotator cuff issues from overtraining. I wonder if this will help or hurt. I half think this may help. Thoughts?

    That'l depend on what sort of issues you have.

    I royally buggered up my right shoulder a few years back and am only NOW finally able to start getting back into things fully. However kettlebells are great for me because of the range of motion I can get.

    ie, I can do a Turkish Getup.. Now you can do this with all sorts of weights, I've done bumbbells, barbells, kettlebells, medballs and all those things, some people like to use bricks, people, what ever.. Like this guy



    But the important thing to realise here is that the shoulder is moving through a really broad range of motion, which for my shoulder is excellent but it's not for everyone and you do need good form and a strong shoulder to perform this exercise, so you start light and progress upwards when learning things like this.

    But you always start at the swing spend forever getting the move right and then go to one handed swings before you get to a getup.
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    Apr 23, 2011 4:01 AM GMT
    Today was legs and cardio so I gave it a try a bit. I don't see the point and I'm not sure I see how this works. It just seems counter to what we've always tried not to do with lifting weight by kind of just throwing the weights around versus slow and controlled. Maybe it will take a few times before I see what it does.
  • chgobuzz1

    Posts: 155

    Apr 23, 2011 4:31 AM GMT
    I am still mastering the swing. But have done the Halo and tried the Turkish Getup (why is it called that I wonder?) But I am learing form more than anything. I also need to stretch first to get the shoulder range of motion. My class is anywhere from 4 to 8 people. That makes it more like personal trainig as everyone is at a different level so much of the hour is spent with the instructor working with each of us. We all did a walk around the room with a kettlebell (16 plbs for me) held as high and straight as one arm could be extended for maybe 10 minutes with no break. That was veru difficult. My back area is painful afterward and the next day to be sure but I think my lower back muscles and glutes are getting stronger. I also want an ab workout too and this seems to be good for abs if I understand correctly ?
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    Apr 23, 2011 4:39 AM GMT
    OneGeezer saidToday was legs and cardio so I gave it a try a bit. I don't see the point and I'm not sure I see how this works. It just seems counter to what we've always tried not to do with lifting weight by kind of just throwing the weights around versus slow and controlled. Maybe it will take a few times before I see what it does.


    I'd like to say that if you are "throwing" the KB, you are most likely doing something wrong and will wind up hurting yourself ...

    The two handed swing is about a stable arc that you control from start to finish; recommend the book by Pavel Tsatsouline "Enter the Kettlebell" - he does an awesome job of going thru the basic KB moves and excruciating detail on proper form.
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    Apr 23, 2011 5:56 AM GMT
    alphatrigger said
    OneGeezer saidToday was legs and cardio so I gave it a try a bit. I don't see the point and I'm not sure I see how this works. It just seems counter to what we've always tried not to do with lifting weight by kind of just throwing the weights around versus slow and controlled. Maybe it will take a few times before I see what it does.


    I'd like to say that if you are "throwing" the KB, you are most likely doing something wrong and will wind up hurting yourself ...

    The two handed swing is about a stable arc that you control from start to finish; recommend the book by Pavel Tsatsouline "Enter the Kettlebell" - he does an awesome job of going thru the basic KB moves and excruciating detail on proper form.


    Like this one.



    I'm real picky regarding form during weight lifting and I just don't quite get it yet with the kettlebells. I'll keep working at it.

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    Apr 23, 2011 7:49 AM GMT
    alphatrigger said
    OneGeezer saidToday was legs and cardio so I gave it a try a bit. I don't see the point and I'm not sure I see how this works. It just seems counter to what we've always tried not to do with lifting weight by kind of just throwing the weights around versus slow and controlled. Maybe it will take a few times before I see what it does.


    I'd like to say that if you are "throwing" the KB, you are most likely doing something wrong and will wind up hurting yourself ...

    The two handed swing is about a stable arc that you control from start to finish; recommend the book by Pavel Tsatsouline "Enter the Kettlebell" - he does an awesome job of going thru the basic KB moves and excruciating detail on proper form.

    Gotta agree with Alphatrigger, when your doing a swing it's not about throwing the weight around. The weight doesn't move up by brute force either. The hip pop creates the momentum and you lead the weight back down again (bad description, need to work on that heh)

    Keep at it, make sure you focus on form not weight.
  • Menergy_1

    Posts: 737

    Apr 23, 2011 1:48 PM GMT
    My trainer incorporates some kettlebell work into my combination cardio/weights/functional workout once a week (the other two days are strength/weight training session). An intense and beneficial set of various upper and lower body excercises with moderate (so far) weight kettlebells make my heart rate go up quickly, make me breathe hard, and I feel the benefits of the coordination of core, balance, extremities and functional/movement challenges.

    He himself works out hard with them for long sessions, sometimes exclusively, and he remarked that his mass has increased, according to a girlfriend who remarked thus recently, even though he hadn't really realized it -- He's incredibly fit, hard-bodied, proportioned and a twice-former Mr. New Mexico, but no longer in that "bodybuilding" mode . He runs on trails, hikes, works out hard to maintain his physique, and is an inspiration to his clients (can you detect some hot attraction from me there? LOL).

    I'm ordering the Tsatsouline book and DVD so I can incorporate some kettlebell work (with correct technique and form) in my home gym session, too.