Moving to Canada any advice?

  • free_mind12

    Posts: 301

    Apr 27, 2011 9:25 AM GMT
    Within the next two years it is my resolute intention to move to Canada-any advice?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 9:54 AM GMT
    Dress in layers... Lots of layers
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 10:01 AM GMT
    nice to have you join us!! which city? come to vancouver, we rarely deal with snow in the winters and our summers are delightful! and we have the best skiing in the world right nearby. we also have a beach. enough said.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 10:03 AM GMT
    Advice? Here in Canada we value diversity and we don't judge people until AFTER we meet them.
  • free_mind12

    Posts: 301

    Apr 27, 2011 10:12 AM GMT
    thecanadianone saidnice to have you join us!! which city? come to vancouver, we rarely deal with snow in the winters and our summers are delightful! and we have the best skiing in the world right nearby. we also have a beach. enough said.


    Montreal
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 10:17 AM GMT
    Watch out for cars... if you're a pedestrian
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 11:02 AM GMT
    Them Canadians - they're tricky ones.
  • TheAlchemixt

    Posts: 2294

    Apr 27, 2011 11:04 AM GMT
    Them Canadians they're the hot ones, you're one lucky bastard!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 11:28 AM GMT
    living wise..there is no diffrence..you do not have to change all of your electric cords..same current as we use.

    their money is better than ours..well actually anything is better than the US DOLLAR,now days..

    yes winters are longer,and in montreal and toronto,they have a wonderful underground shopping arcade,where you dont have to deal with the cold and the snow..just miles of underground shopping mall..

    i beleive that unlike in the U.S.A.,where we get paid every 2 weeks,they get paid once a month..i could be wrong..check on that..

    not sure if u can keep your U.S. PASSPORT as a dual citzen,after 5 years..something to think about..

    but over all..i think it will be a easy transition for you..as everyone speaks english,even in quebec city..they may not want to speak english,but they will if you are polite to them..

    go and have fun..i spend every week in canada with my airline job..
    i agree vancouver is wonderful..so much to do out doors,
    i agree calgary is wonderful as well..every june they have the gay rodeo.
    i agree toronto is the northern version of new york city..big,24/7 non stop,hot and muggy in the summer..the people are diverse and wonderful to chat with..
    also..remember,,very few places have american style a/c..if u love a/c like we have in this country,then get ready for a melt down.

    but i love Montreal and Quebec city..

    besides flying international route to the deep south and europe,i spend more time in canada..

    go forth.and have fun..
    traffic is no worse than any where else around the globe..well accept than in india..india they have no idea what a stop light is..they drive as they wish,and the cops dont do anything..lol

    that my friend is another story..
    enjoy your self..
    jimmy
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 11:36 AM GMT
    The hotties are all in Toronto it seems. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 11:38 AM GMT
    rjb2001 saidThe hotties are all in Toronto it seems. icon_biggrin.gif


    I know!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 11:43 AM GMT
    If you haven't got citizenship/immigration clearance already get started now as it takes ages.

    And you can certainly remain an American citizen while holding Canadian citizenship. Lots of people do this including most of my family.
  • matt13226

    Posts: 829

    Apr 27, 2011 11:53 AM GMT
    Stay away from horny moose/s
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 1:57 PM GMT
    Unless your job is negotiating a transfer, be prepared for a long bureaucratic struggle. I spent years in Canada trying to stay and attain permanent residency status.... Twas a no go and a huge mistake.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 2:00 PM GMT
    Yeah you'll find more muscle jocks in TO. But Montreal is a bit more exotic with its mix of french and english. Winters are awful but the summers are wild.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 2:08 PM GMT
    we can give you better advice if you can tell us which city you are considering.

    free_mind12 saidWithin the next two years it is my resolute intention to move to Canada-any advice?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 2:15 PM GMT
    Brush up on your French if you move to Montreal, otherwise it's harder to get a good job or a job in general.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 2:49 PM GMT
    I moved from Ohio to Québec 10 years ago, and will have dual citizenship in a few months.

    If you are looking for job opportunities, then Canada has LOTS to choose from (mainly Toronto, Alberta, and Vancouver). But if you are looking for a comfortable city with lots to do, where it is easy to travel from place to place, tons of culture (alternative, classical, ethnic and everything in between), diversity and gays, where it is clear every day you are in a foreign country that is quite different from everywhere else, then Montréal is where its at.

    If you apply for permanent residency NOW while still living in the states, you may attain it within your time frame. On the other hand, if you want to move sooner, look into moving here under NAFTA, all you need is a letter of job offer in a field that is in demand. It helps if you are in a trade, like welding, or a tech field. But many other fields qualify as well. And employers can help. For example, I know someone who took a job doing data entry, but the employer listed her as a "researcher" so that she would qualify under NAFTA.

    Feel free to contact me, I and I will be happy to share with you what I know.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 2:59 PM GMT
    Don't do it.
    xD
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 3:02 PM GMT
    TrevorMark saidDon't do it.
    xD


    LOL what do you know you're not from Canada. Although Mich is close to Canada. You take weekend trips there I assume?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 6:47 PM GMT
    Like others have inferred - it would be best to narrow down your location preference - i.e. are you looking to live in a large urban centre, medium size town or in rural Canada.

    The regions are quite spread out and all have their own pros and cons. In general they can be broken down by East Coast/Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario, Prairies (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta), West Coast (British Columbia), and the North (Territories).

    The biggest urban centres are Toronto (Ontario), Vancouver (BC), and Montreal (Quebec).

    If you're leaning towards any particular regions or cities it would be easier to provide some pro's and con's for advice.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 6:54 PM GMT
    ya bring lots of money with you
    everything is more expensive here... we have a lot of taxes
    but in the end you will get free healthcare and other good social programs. Uh oh I just said social programs to an American... icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 7:05 PM GMT
    ...However living expenses in Montreal are quite cheap.

    I would advise not to live in an English neighbourhood. From what I observed when I was looking to move there, there are basically two rental markets, an English one and a French one. Anglophones get screwed. icon_razz.gif
  • hyperionx

    Posts: 232

    Apr 27, 2011 7:45 PM GMT
    free_mind12 saidWithin the next two years it is my resolute intention to move to Canada-any advice?


    Unless you have dual-citizenship or a university-level education, it will be a huge effort to move to Canada.

    It's terribly difficult to maintain residency and get a job here unless you have either one of those things. Every American I've met here over the past two years that has remained here has usually been over-35, with lots of professional experience, and who works in a very niche industry where the employer has tripped over their feet in an attempt to navigate the bureaucratic mess to help them keep their permanent residency status.

    Out of curiosity, why are you so "resolute" to move to Canada in the first place?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2011 7:48 PM GMT
    JIMMY said...

    i beleive that unlike in the U.S.A.,where we get paid every 2 weeks,they get paid once a month..i could be wrong..check on that..

    go and have fun..i spend every week in canada with my airline job..
    i agree vancouver is wonderful..so much to do out doors,
    i agree calgary is wonderful as well..every june they have the gay rodeo.
    i agree toronto is the northern version of new york city..big,24/7 non stop,hot and muggy in the summer..the people are diverse and wonderful to chat with..
    also..remember,,very few places have american style a/c..if u love a/c like we have in this country,then get ready for a melt down.

    ...
    enjoy your self..
    jimmy


    Most jobs in Canada pay every other week, as in the US. Likewise two weeks' holiday per year is still the legal minimum, although many employers (especially in competitive markets like Vancouver and Calgary) are increasingly offering 3 wks.

    In Toronto most places are air conditioned in the summer---we have to, days of over 100F are not uncommon in July and August and then the humidity factor makes it feel worse. Even our public buses and subway trains are air conditioned--though you suffer on the streetcars!