To the personal trainers

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 04, 2011 12:54 AM GMT
    Have any of you ever worked with someone who has benign joint hypermobility syndrome (its fancy speak for double jointed)?

    I ask because when I was looking to get a PT I made sure to ask if they had experience working with someone like myself.
    "Sure, I've had a few clients [blah blah blah]"

    Then working out - "OH MY GAWD YOUR FLEXIBLE" icon_neutral.gif



    So the main reason I ask if anyone's had experience is because a lot of the stretches just don't do a thing for me. At this point I'm just going to ask what muscle group I need to stretch and do it myself with yoga that I know I'll feel. Should I just deal with this or are there trainers out there who have actually come across this?
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    May 04, 2011 1:33 AM GMT
    Hatter saidHave any of you ever worked with someone who has benign joint hypermobility syndrome (its fancy speak for double jointed)?

    I ask because when I was looking to get a PT I made sure to ask if they had experience working with someone like myself.
    "Sure, I've had a few clients [blah blah blah]"

    Then working out - "OH MY GAWD YOUR FLEXIBLE" icon_neutral.gif



    So the main reason I ask if anyone's had experience is because a lot of the stretches just don't do a thing for me. At this point I'm just going to ask what muscle group I need to stretch and do it myself with yoga that I know I'll feel. Should I just deal with this or are there trainers out there who have actually come across this?


    Why are you trying to stretch? If your joints are hypermobile, you should be strengthening the muscles that support these joints so that they have more stability. You stretch to improve mobility. You strengthen to provide stability. With hypermobility, you need an aggressive strengthening program.
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    May 04, 2011 1:38 AM GMT
    catfish5 said
    Hatter saidHave any of you ever worked with someone who has benign joint hypermobility syndrome (its fancy speak for double jointed)?

    I ask because when I was looking to get a PT I made sure to ask if they had experience working with someone like myself.
    "Sure, I've had a few clients [blah blah blah]"

    Then working out - "OH MY GAWD YOUR FLEXIBLE" icon_neutral.gif



    So the main reason I ask if anyone's had experience is because a lot of the stretches just don't do a thing for me. At this point I'm just going to ask what muscle group I need to stretch and do it myself with yoga that I know I'll feel. Should I just deal with this or are there trainers out there who have actually come across this?


    Why are you trying to stretch? If your joints are hypermobile, you should be strengthening the muscles that support these joints so that they have more stability. You stretch to improve mobility. You strengthen to provide stability. With hypermobility, you need an aggressive strengthening program.
    great call catfish
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 04, 2011 1:54 AM GMT
    catfish5 said
    Hatter saidHave any of you ever worked with someone who has benign joint hypermobility syndrome (its fancy speak for double jointed)?

    I ask because when I was looking to get a PT I made sure to ask if they had experience working with someone like myself.
    "Sure, I've had a few clients [blah blah blah]"

    Then working out - "OH MY GAWD YOUR FLEXIBLE" icon_neutral.gif



    So the main reason I ask if anyone's had experience is because a lot of the stretches just don't do a thing for me. At this point I'm just going to ask what muscle group I need to stretch and do it myself with yoga that I know I'll feel. Should I just deal with this or are there trainers out there who have actually come across this?


    Why are you trying to stretch? If your joints are hypermobile, you should be strengthening the muscles that support these joints so that they have more stability. You stretch to improve mobility. You strengthen to provide stability. With hypermobility, you need an aggressive strengthening program.


    Strength training is more the area that I've been trying on my own. I had decided to get the trainer just to help me in terms of learning exercises and forms, so in that respect it's been good.

    Most of the stretches have been for part of the warmup/cool down - which is easy enough on it's own if I were to do my own thing for the specified muscle groups. My concern though is that I have a tendency to over extend and my weight limits are just less than most (loose joints = weaker joints). I would just like to know of anything that I should try and watch because of these things or specified workouts that would help with them.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 04, 2011 1:58 AM GMT
    Yes. Catfish had it right. You need to stabilize the joints. Keep them from being "Hypermobile".

    Ask your Trainer if they have studied Reebok Neuromuscular Training, RNT for short. If so, you are in luck. He or she will know how to help you stabilize the joints.

    Good luck.
  • westdave

    Posts: 212

    May 04, 2011 2:11 AM GMT
    nikeathlete saidYes. Catfish had it right. You need to stabilize the joints. Keep them from being "Hypermobile".

    Ask your Trainer if they have studied Reebok Neuromuscular Training, RNT for short. If so, you are in luck. He or she will know how to help you stabilize the joints.

    Good luck.


    I've never looked into the reebok neuromuscular training....I'll have a look...
  • westdave

    Posts: 212

    May 04, 2011 2:17 AM GMT
    Hatter saidHave any of you ever worked with someone who has benign joint hypermobility syndrome (its fancy speak for double jointed)?

    I ask because when I was looking to get a PT I made sure to ask if they had experience working with someone like myself.
    "Sure, I've had a few clients [blah blah blah]"

    Then working out - "OH MY GAWD YOUR FLEXIBLE" icon_neutral.gif



    So the main reason I ask if anyone's had experience is because a lot of the stretches just don't do a thing for me. At this point I'm just going to ask what muscle group I need to stretch and do it myself with yoga that I know I'll feel. Should I just deal with this or are there trainers out there who have actually come across this?


    actually...I worked with a Pilates Instructor who had this issue...when she was pre-natal it was terrible with all the relaxin she was producing....this is not my area of expertise, but you should take care of your joints as you may have issues when you become much older >60 yrs. old
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    May 04, 2011 2:24 AM GMT
    nikeathlete saidYes. Catfish had it right. You need to stabilize the joints. Keep them from being "Hypermobile".

    Ask your Trainer if they have studied Reebok Neuromuscular Training, RNT for short. If so, you are in luck. He or she will know how to help you stabilize the joints.

    Good luck.
    nikeathlete, thank you for the info i will definitely have a look too
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 04, 2011 3:26 AM GMT
    westdave saidactually...I worked with a Pilates Instructor who had this issue...when she was pre-natal it was terrible with all the relaxin she was producing....this is not my area of expertise, but you should take care of your joints as you may have issues when you become much older >60 yrs. old


    Yeah, I've heard that it makes you prone to terrible arthritis/sprains, that's why I've been trying to hit the gym and get the joints in shape (in addition to just wanting to get into shape). Case and point is why I've started to run in vibrams - good way to try and get the ankles nice and strong.

    I feel for her though, I'm sure that must have been rough as if having a kid wasn't bad enough icon_sad.gif


    nikeathlete. I'll definitely look into that. Thanks a ton!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 04, 2011 7:38 PM GMT
    Hatter said
    catfish5 said
    Hatter saidHave any of you ever worked with someone who has benign joint hypermobility syndrome (its fancy speak for double jointed)?

    I ask because when I was looking to get a PT I made sure to ask if they had experience working with someone like myself.
    "Sure, I've had a few clients [blah blah blah]"

    Then working out - "OH MY GAWD YOUR FLEXIBLE" icon_neutral.gif



    So the main reason I ask if anyone's had experience is because a lot of the stretches just don't do a thing for me. At this point I'm just going to ask what muscle group I need to stretch and do it myself with yoga that I know I'll feel. Should I just deal with this or are there trainers out there who have actually come across this?


    Why are you trying to stretch? If your joints are hypermobile, you should be strengthening the muscles that support these joints so that they have more stability. You stretch to improve mobility. You strengthen to provide stability. With hypermobility, you need an aggressive strengthening program.


    Strength training is more the area that I've been trying on my own. I had decided to get the trainer just to help me in terms of learning exercises and forms, so in that respect it's been good.

    Most of the stretches have been for part of the warmup/cool down - which is easy enough on it's own if I were to do my own thing for the specified muscle groups. My concern though is that I have a tendency to over extend and my weight limits are just less than most (loose joints = weaker joints). I would just like to know of anything that I should try and watch because of these things or specified workouts that would help with them.


    Warm up/cool down with light intensity cardio. 20-30minutes on the stationary bike prior to or after strength training. And try the neuromuscular training. It is very appropriate for your condition.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 04, 2011 9:07 PM GMT
    the other thing that sometimes (?often) happens is that people with some areas hypermobile have other areas which are unnaturally stiff... so you can have hyper shoulders and a very stiff mid upper back as the shoulders do all the movement.

    I´ve also taught preggy women, high on relaxin. They bend like overcooked spaghetti.
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    May 04, 2011 9:25 PM GMT
    Are you using a strength training program specific to BJHS? If not you really need to do that. I think there is a specific type of stretching that focuses on isolation of the muscle rather than the traditional "all" approach. You have joint flexibility but not necessarily muscle flexibility -- meaning you need to stretch and strength train with specific techniques.