Tips for running...

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 04, 2011 7:14 PM GMT
    Running is my new thing, i decided to go running around the soccer field at the club every other day.

    I need to know how to stretch before running and after, and what steps should i pursue: do i start warming up by walking around the track then jogging then running? or what?

    Last thing, what cardio training should i follow after running? Normal push-ups, sit-ups and pull-ups with the variations? or there is something special??
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 05, 2011 5:32 AM GMT
    Don't stretch before. Here's an article about stretching..

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/02/sports/playmagazine/112pewarm.html?ref=health

    I like to warm up by doing a few of these..

    - No weight squats
    - Toe hops
    - Butt kickers
    - Jogging in place
    - Walking a couple of blocks
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 05, 2011 6:33 AM GMT
    Prior to a run, I do the following exercises that a trainer recommended-

    • Leg raises – standing tall- raise your right leg in front of you to a 90-degree angle, if you can not do a 90-degree angle, then 45-degree angles. Bring your leg down to the starting position. Your left leg is your equilibrium and should be stable, no movement. Repeat. Do 15 reps - then switch to the left leg.


    • Donkey kicks – standing tall,- bend your right calf, now thrust your knee backwards, you should feel your buttocks being stretched, bring the knee back to the starting position, ensure your knee does not go beyond your starting position and is bend in starting position. Repeat. Do 15 reps – then switch to the left leg.

    • Lateral Leg raises – standing tall – move your right leg to the side up to a 90- degree, if you can not do a 90-degree, then 45-degree. Bring your leg down to starting position. Repeat. Do 15 reps- then switch to the left leg.

    • Nut Crackers – standing tall -, move your right leg in front of you about 5 degrees, imagine that your inner thighs you have a nut and trying to crack it and can not fall to the floor. Swivel your leg in front of you, back and forth as though you are trying to crack a nut. Should be small swivels. Repeat. Do 15 reps – then switch to the left leg.

    • Outer Hurdles- standing tall- raise your right leg in front of you, swivel your leg to the right in a big circle, imagine there is a hurdle in front on you that you have to overcome, ensure that as your leg comes down, not to touch the floor. Bring your leg back up, so you will be doing circles in the air. The purpose of this exercise is to stretch your hip area.

    • Inner Hurdles- standing tall- raise your right leg in front of you, swivel your leg outward to the right, but this time bring the leg inward to your groin area doing inner circles, do not let your leg touch the floor. Repeat. 15 Reps, then do the left leg.

    All these exercise will test your equilibrium of each leg and flexibility; additionally it will strengthen your muscles and stretch. Some camps will say no value is stretching others will say stretch. I believe that you need to warm up and stretch your muscles. I feel much better and flexible when I do these exercises.

    After the run, ensure you have some potassium available to you, it will help with soar ness and recovery.

    Good luck.
  • ArmsandLegs

    Posts: 125

    May 05, 2011 6:53 AM GMT
    xrichx saidDon't stretch before. Here's an article about stretching..




    Static stretching isn't beneficial, but dynamic stretching is... theres a difference.

    Be sure to "warm up" your muscles before doing any exercise.
  • mynyun

    Posts: 1346

    May 05, 2011 7:18 AM GMT
    I hate running but I started doing it for cardio. These are good tips. I'll have to remember these or print them off. So I can hate running a little less. icon_rolleyes.gificon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 05, 2011 8:31 AM GMT
    run on the balls of your feet, not your heels. Try running barefoot on the street or some other hard surface and the natural way to run will automatically reveal itself...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 05, 2011 9:25 AM GMT
    Great replies

    Am sure going to try some of these exercises and will give u back the results. Its really great coz my muscles been soar (nice tip for the potassium - how did i forget?) and i felt clueless as am not a sports person at all icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2011 2:06 AM GMT
    after running stretching is important. start with stretching biggest muscles to smaller (glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, in that order). this will prevent future pain and soreness.

    I've never been a big fan of pre-run stretching, but that's a personal thing. I agree with what others suggest.

    good luck!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2011 5:52 PM GMT
    warm up with a really really slow jog .
    then running sideways and backward is also good as it changes the stress on the muscles and warms up peripheral muscles.

    before a race i always warm up thoroughly and do some stretching right after - before the race that is .

    but when i just go running, i don't bother with anything, i just dress up and go - slow to medium at first and when i feel my body kicking in, i increase the tempo.
    if i'm a good boy i stretch afterwards... most of the time i'm just a lazy ass .




  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2011 6:45 PM GMT
    I'm a Cross Country/Track coach. There are definitely some good pointers above. Before doing anything, get a good pair of runnning shoes. Running shoes are designed for different types of foot strikes, so don't just select something that looks cool; any reputable running goods store will get you in the right pair.

    1. Running barefoot (what's sometimes called minimalist running) is the new rage. If you do it, don't do so on a hard surface until your body is used to it - you will get shin splints. Start with short distances on a soft surface.

    2. Run with whatever form works for you. The rule of thumb is that the faster you go, the more you should be on the balls of your feet. For some people, that is natural, for some not. I actually used to be a heel striker then sometime shortly after college naturally switched to mid-sole striker. No idea how or why that heppened, it just did.

    3. Agree that stretching is a good thing. Mixed reviews on when and what type, but most experts agree the dynamic stretches and warmup routines are best. The lower intensity dynamic exercises can serve as a great cooldown also. My teams do a 1/2-mile jog warmup, then dynamic stretching drills, then their workout. We'll ocassionally do static stretching afterward.

    4. You asked about push-ups and pull-ups. Yes, your core is very important and those are beneficial. They can be done at any time. My teams include them as part of the warmup or save it for after the workout/run.

    5. Find a warmup routine that works for you. A progression like you asked about is great. Starting with a slow jog is great also. Just don't start out with a fast run - you'll get hurt.

    Good luck!

    PS. http://runningplanet.com/ and http://www.runnersworld.com/ are great resources for any runner, rookie or veteran.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2011 8:58 PM GMT
    runnerjc saidI'm a Cross Country/Track coach. There are definitely some good pointers above. Before doing anything, get a good pair of runnning shoes. Running shoes are designed for different types of foot strikes, so don't just select something that looks cool; any reputable running goods store will get you in the right pair.

    1. Running barefoot (what's sometimes called minimalist running) is the new rage. If you do it, don't do so on a hard surface until your body is used to it - you will get shin splints. Start with short distances on a soft surface.

    2. Run with whatever form works for you. The rule of thumb is that the faster you go, the more you should be on the balls of your feet. For some people, that is natural, for some not. I actually used to be a heel striker then sometime shortly after college naturally switched to mid-sole striker. No idea how or why that heppened, it just did.

    3. Agree that stretching is a good thing. Mixed reviews on when and what type, but most experts agree the dynamic stretches and warmup routines are best. The lower intensity dynamic exercises can serve as a great cooldown also. My teams do a 1/2-mile jog warmup, then dynamic stretching drills, then their workout. We'll ocassionally do static stretching afterward.

    4. You asked about push-ups and pull-ups. Yes, your core is very important and those are beneficial. They can be done at any time. My teams include them as part of the warmup or save it for after the workout/run.

    5. Find a warmup routine that works for you. A progression like you asked about is great. Starting with a slow jog is great also. Just don't start out with a fast run - you'll get hurt.

    Good luck!

    PS. http://runningplanet.com/ and http://www.runnersworld.com/ are great resources for any runner, rookie or veteran.


    Guys, am so glad for the great advice; I went today, i didn't stretch before running (static), i made some dynamic stretching at home before i went to the club (spiderman, scorpion and leg kicks), then i headed there, i jogged around the soccer field 2 laps, then i got faster and i did 10 laps in 30 minutes. I dnt feel as hurt as in the first two times when i made the static stretches...
    I did them after and i had potassium... VERY useful and u really made my life better!!!
    I THANK you all,,, and wud still like to hear more advice...
    Cheers,
    Mahmoud
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 06, 2011 9:09 PM GMT
    Take it slow and take it easy. Rome wasn't built in a day, and you need to lay a good foundation. Without a good base, the walls fall down.

    http://www.RunnersWorld.com
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 08, 2011 12:01 AM GMT
    Keep your toe nails cut short. This is more noticeable with longer distance runs.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 08, 2011 12:50 AM GMT
    Anomalous saidKeep your toe nails cut short. This is more noticeable with longer distance runs.


    AMEN to that. I have one toe that I can NEVER keep a decent toe nail. It turns BLACK constantly.
  • james716

    Posts: 73

    May 08, 2011 4:54 AM GMT
    Don't run too much, too soon. Give your bones, joints, and muscles time to acclimate. You'll be so turned off to running after your first, preventable, injury. There are beginner runner programs all over the net.

    Have fun!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 08, 2011 10:24 PM GMT
    Anomalous saidKeep your toe nails cut short. This is more noticeable with longer distance runs.


    Nice one icon_wink.gificon_wink.gificon_wink.gif I always do that. icon_smile.gif


    I'm following your tips jocks and they r great, i feel no muscle soreness and i feel energetic and happy...

    Thanks a lottttt i never thought i'd feel this good after plenty of failed experiences in running through several years...

    U are the best icon_biggrin.gificon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 08, 2011 11:37 PM GMT
    My second toenail on both feet used to get black a lot. I think it was a combination of not trimming them right, too much running, and improperly fitted shoes. It was pretty gross to look at. icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 09, 2011 12:08 AM GMT
    Black toenails aren't always because of a lack of trimming. I get it on my fourth toe on the left foot only. Turns out my feet are 1/2 size different and running shoes flex on top of the toe on the shorter foot, creating pressure on the nail. I've found that a shoe that doesn't have a seam above the nail helps - not always easy to find.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 09, 2011 12:12 AM GMT
    xrichx saidMy second toenail on both feet used to get black a lot. I think it was a combination of not trimming them right, too much running, and improperly fitted shoes. It was pretty gross to look at. icon_lol.gif


    Well...

    Trim em and get fitting shoes icon_lol.gificon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 10, 2011 1:02 AM GMT
    maybe it was just left over nail polish .
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 10, 2011 9:36 PM GMT
    Hey, so today i went running... icon_smile.gif

    The thing is after warming up and all, and following all the routines; when i started running i got this killing pain in my tibialis anterior muscle, and when i stretched that muscle, it was fine but i cudn't walk and the pain goes while running and shows when i stop...

    I dunno whats wrong in there and i really appreciate advice... icon_smile.gif
  • havingfunmtl9...

    Posts: 258

    May 10, 2011 9:46 PM GMT
    Hey !

    I ran for 8 yrs at the national level and the number one piece of advice I give when asked is to use your arms! Running is all about a great, fluid movement, so don't be afraid to pump your arms, at a relaxed 90 degree angle, raise your knees, and keep your head up. Once you have the form you will be able to push yourself harder. Getting tired? Just start pumping those arms, you will naturally try to keep your feet in pace!

    Light warm up before harder runs, and pace yourself.

    Best of luck !
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 10, 2011 10:52 PM GMT
    GREAT!

    Thanks for the advice!! icon_smile.gif
  • mynyun

    Posts: 1346

    Jun 13, 2011 1:45 AM GMT

    I've been running outside a lot more lately than in the gym. But one of the two things that hinders my progress is one my legs ache around the shins and feel like weights, which I can tolerate. But also my side aches near the bottom of my ribs. Just on my right side not my left. Why is that.?? What do I need to do.?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 14, 2011 9:05 PM GMT
    Since we are talking about it, anyone have an opinion about running in Vibrams?