Pros and Cons of paying for a Personal Trainer

  • Little_Spoon

    Posts: 1562

    May 10, 2011 12:18 PM GMT
    Alrighty.

    So I've been contemplating getting a personal trainer. What are some opinions on them? Experiences? Good Prices? You know, the basics that you've guys dealt with.



    icon_biggrin.gif
    Would having a male personal trainer be too distracting?
    Kind of a fantasy of mine... I don't need that kind of trouble.
    Just sayin'
    :p
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 10, 2011 12:21 PM GMT
    If he's a really good trainer, you'll be too exhausted to be hitting on him (much).
    If you look hard enough, you'll find a PT who will come to your house and show you non-weight/machine workouts...and do them naked. icon_wink.gif
  • james716

    Posts: 73

    May 10, 2011 2:21 PM GMT
    I say do it. There are so many advantages. The only disadvantage I can think of is cost, but isn't it maybe a hedge against more expensive health issues when you're older and less able to work. I pay about $300/mo.

    I'm grateful to have him there to push me when I probably would have cut a few reps out if I were alone.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 10, 2011 4:07 PM GMT
    You can make no better investment in your health. Definitely get a personal trainer to reach your goals!

  • May 10, 2011 11:31 PM GMT
    When I was 18, I got a personal trainer. I had just ran and did cheerleading, I knew nothing about weights... He was great, he always adjusted my workouts, and it I was slipping on my own he was there to push me even farther. I had him until I moved(small gym/new trainer, he was charging me $18/hr), I kept him for a year and man after a few weeks did it show...

    When I graduate I will get another one, personally for me once a week is plenty, I can do the rest on my own... It motivates you, adjusts your workouts as you progress, only downside is I have tried finding one but they all want $25+ an hour, which is okay, I just don't have the money.
  • Little_Spoon

    Posts: 1562

    May 18, 2011 9:40 AM GMT
    I'm so psyched about this! Ahh!
  • josephmovie

    Posts: 533

    May 18, 2011 10:23 AM GMT
    I've had a few personal trainers and the quality varies wildly. While all had good intentions, only a couple were able to follow it through with results via a program that worked for me.

    I would say that you should see some sort of result after about 4 weeks. If not, move on. I trained with someone for a year and saw no results at all. Such a bloody waste!
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    May 18, 2011 11:48 AM GMT
    Definitely get a PT. Suss out how good he is though. luckily I also work in the health sector so I can suss out pretty quickly if someone knows their shit. Definitely make sure they are giving you nutritional advice (and that they are competent at this). Also make sure you have a program to continue with on days when you're not seeing your training.
    They are expensive, mine is about $500 a month.
    And yeh... sorry but even if yours is hot, which mine is, you'll be so damn exhausted and thinking the dude is the spawn of satan by the end of a session to be interested in anything else.
    all the best mate!
  • MuscleComeBac...

    Posts: 2376

    May 18, 2011 1:36 PM GMT
    The best investment you can make. Truly. Better than health insurance, better than pouring money into books or supplements or anything else.

    Here are some reasons it CAN/SHOULD be a good investment:
    1. You take away the guessing, and you put your trust in a well-trained professional who is shaping a program specific to your goals and your abilities.
    2. Accountability - by entering into a contract with a trainer, you bump up your commitment to showing up and doing the work regularly, so goals are more easily attained and you develop better discipline in your routine.
    3. Results - an objective eye to push you beyond where you are comfortable, but still keep you safe and healthy, which means that you will grow and change more rapidly. A trainer's calling card is 50% their appearance, and 50% their clients' appearance. If you don't look good, they don't look good.

    Now, the trick is how to find someone. Most people just go with the desk monkey at the club where they have membership. I think it's a very bad idea. It's the equivalent of hiring your car salesman as your mechanic.

    A trainer should
    1. Be certified by more than one certifying board or organization, and preferably one that requires hands-on testing and instruction as part of the training, not merely paper testing. For this reason, I find ISSA trainers to be lacking a great deal of the time, although not always (some ISSA programs are rigorous but the basic certification is something anyone can test for - be careful)
    2. Have been working in the industry FULL TIME for a minimum of five (5) years with a broad range of clients, the majority of whom have been with them for two (2) years or more and to whom they can refer you for reference.
    3. Offer you a list of references, and have a portfolio of before/after results that includes at least three (3) or more current or previous clients in your age range, of your gender, and whose results look similar to your goals.
    4. Be the same gender as you (I'm going to take heat on this one, but I feel very strongly that the best application of training principals means having as close a matching experience as possible, and that includes gender...fire away!)
    5. Be in superior physical condition, and not smoke, drink or do recreational drugs.
    6. Be focused on YOU not on conversation about the weather, what is happening in their personal life, or pop-culture when training you.
    7. Explain their approach clearly, answer all your questions.
    8. Push you, and encourage you, and keep you informed of your progress.
    9. Be on time, every time, and not cancel on you.
    10. Be willing to talk to your doctor or other health-care partners about their approach to you goals.
    11. Have an approach to working with you that is unique to you, and not just the same thing they do with every client (this is something you discover by asking questions of their references. There is commonality, but there has to be some specificity that is unique to each client reference, otherwise, you've got a desk-monkey who trains everybody the same - that's NOT a good trainer.)

    I think a reasonable starting fee is $65 an hour, with discounted rates for more than three sessions a week.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 18, 2011 1:46 PM GMT
    PRO: Its just good common sense
    CON: Price

    Don't let the CON stop you. Having a personal trainer, even if its just a short time to get you on the right path, is the best investment you can do for your health.

    Be sure to ask around and talk to several personal trainers. Find one you click with... trust me, you will know what I am talking about when you start interviewing them. I have met some female trainers who are as good and better than many of the male counterparts. I personally use a female trainer who was rated as on of the top 5 in Baltimore and we just clicked. Even though a friend is a personal trainer, a damn good one too, and very easy on the eyes. I just felt that my trainer better aligned with my fitness goals.
  • james716

    Posts: 73

    May 19, 2011 1:03 AM GMT
    Fantastic advice!
  • justinlee86

    Posts: 501

    May 19, 2011 1:08 AM GMT
    I just recently hired one and I am loving it!!!!
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    May 19, 2011 1:17 AM GMT
    Little_Spoon saidAlrighty.

    So I've been contemplating getting a personal trainer. What are some opinions on them? Experiences? Good Prices? You know, the basics that you've guys dealt with.



    icon_biggrin.gif
    Would having a male personal trainer be too distracting?
    Kind of a fantasy of mine... I don't need that kind of trouble.
    Just sayin'
    :p
    the only con is if he or she is not a good trainer. i guess if they are not gay than that could be double whammy for you. i am a personal trainer and i would definitely hire one if i needed one
  • ChicoUrbano

    Posts: 83

    May 19, 2011 3:56 AM GMT
    Pro: Eye candy
    Con: Less money