Defining the lower chest

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 07, 2008 8:59 PM GMT
    Any tips from any of you on the best chest workouts to define the lower and medial lower border of the pecs?

    Also any tips for developing chest with an injured right shoulder? I have a rotator cuff tear from an old swimming injury that starts to bother me after about 15-20 minutes into a chest routine. Any trainers or sports medicine docs have any experience in dealing with that?

    Thanks in advance.

    -Jake
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    Apr 07, 2008 10:40 PM GMT
    i also have some problems with lower chest..i decide to break up my exercise into two days..one dedicated for a lower chest.

    Clearly, declines are of my favorites. Then you can do dips with hands wider than normal. Then you can do cable crossovers..like reverse lateral raises (close to the body). That is what I do and I think its working.
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    Apr 07, 2008 11:34 PM GMT
    apollodok04 saidAny tips from any of you on the best chest workouts to define the lower and medial lower border of the pecs?

    Also any tips for developing chest with an injured right shoulder? I have a rotator cuff tear from an old swimming injury that starts to bother me after about 15-20 minutes into a chest routine. Any trainers or sports medicine docs have any experience in dealing with that?

    Thanks in advance.

    -Jake


    Declines, decline flys, dips while leaning forward, cable crossovers.

    Oh, and tips for working out with an injured shoulder? Don't.
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    Apr 08, 2008 5:54 AM GMT
    Hurt my rotator cuff last year and went to some PT for it. Starting each workout with dumbbell and cable rotator exercises has been a big help. Either start with with your arm extended to the side and your elbow bent at 90 degrees at rotate upwards, or using a cable machine, keep your arm bent at 90 and your shoulder down and closer to your side, then rotate inward and switch to an outward motion on the next set.

    Since they're a small muscle group, I was told to make sure the weight was very light (no more than five pounds) and to emphasize going very slowly with each rep.

    For side rotators it helps to keep a towel squeezed between your shoulder and side so that all the work comes from your rotator and not from swinging out your elbow.


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    Jun 10, 2008 11:14 PM GMT
    There's no such thing as spot training. If your "lower chest" is lagging, then that is either an issue of fat accumulation in you chest area or an unchangeable part of your genetics.

    Your chest is 2 big muscles, the Pectoralis Major and the Pectoralis Minor. Bench press/incline bench press will always be your best bet for any type of chest growth.

    As far as your injury, this is a very very very very common ache. It's the result of improper form. The best way to fix this is to go back to lower weight to perfect your form, paying particular attention to how your elbows are moving (i.e., they should be tucked close to your torso, and shouldn't flare much or at all).
  • Hunkymonkey

    Posts: 215

    Jun 17, 2008 9:05 AM GMT
    Forward-angled dips and/or decline bench have brought out my lower chest on the outside. Cables and/or pec deck have helped the inner side. Lately, I've been doing chest 2 times a week: incline dumbbell presses, decline bench and pec dec-or-cables on heavy chest day, and just weighted dips on light chest day. Before that, I was doing bench press, incline press, cables or pec deck, & sometimes dips.