Ideas for exercises for my paralyzed side?

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    May 22, 2011 6:20 PM GMT
    I just did some damage again today trying to do situps with dumbbells with the alternating cross punch.

    I rely mostly on situps now with my rehab three times a week.

    Although my left hand works enough that I can hold something in it - there is no sensation with it, so I cannot tell how tightly I am holding it. Extension naturally loosens the grip and as my arm tires I will not feel that loosening.

    The result is I can either lose the weight on flexion (propelling it over my left shoulder or hitting myself in the chin) or on extension, whereupon it crashes to the floor.


    has anyone got any experience or suggestions for me how to tailor a decent workup for myself. I accept i can no longer realistically hope for much more than fitness and definition. Oh and abs. I can still work my abs (but my form isn't quite good as I do them - I collapse into my left side.
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    May 22, 2011 7:55 PM GMT
    Is the condition permanent? If it is, I'd suggest trial-and-error to find things that work for you.
    If it's temporary, it might be best to lay off the workouts and focus on walking and nutrition to stay in shape 'till you're healed up.
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    May 23, 2011 2:22 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidIs the condition permanent? If it is, I'd suggest trial-and-error to find things that work for you.
    If it's temporary, it might be best to lay off the workouts and focus on walking and nutrition to stay in shape 'till you're healed up.


    It's permanent, i'm afraid. no gains in function since 2002 walking and nutrtion is all i do. I used to run too but I took a couple of bad falls (because I can't feel the ground beneath my feet) My doctor told me to stop. I'm on blood thinners for life so I bruise and bleed easily.


    My legs are getting spindly and i'm embarassed by how i look now.


    (although I worked vey hard to eliminate limping.


    I almost never need my cane anymore (and I only use it in winter)



    (oh.. well I do have a tendency to reach out to touch things when i am out walking when i have moments of unsteadiness.
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    May 23, 2011 3:57 PM GMT
    You have complete sensory loss on your entire left side? Pain? Temperature? prioperception (where your arm is without looking at it)

    When you are exercising can you see your muscles tensing (to indicate that your grip is loose or tight)?

    You might consider some kind of safety strap to use on your wrists, but again you need to pay attention to your grip.

    Have you ever seen a neurophysiologist? Finding one that is also versed in sports medicine might be difficult =. I would try to contact the special Olympics and see if they have any recommendations for specialists you can see. I'm sure someone has encountered this before!
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    May 23, 2011 4:08 PM GMT
    I'd would recommend taking a spin class. You would be hooked up to the bike (so no chance of falling) and able to feel the tension in your right side (to gauge how hard your working. And anyone can tell you an hour session can be brutal in that oh so good way. In regards to weight training, you might just need to stay on machines so that there's little risk of anything happening should you lose your grip on one side (most machines have left and right connected so that they compensate each other). Hope this helped.
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    May 23, 2011 4:46 PM GMT
    adam228 saidYou have complete sensory loss on your entire left side? Pain? Temperature? prioperception (where your arm is without looking at it)

    When you are exercising can you see your muscles tensing (to indicate that your grip is loose or tight)?

    You might consider some kind of safety strap to use on your wrists, but again you need to pay attention to your grip.

    Have you ever seen a neurophysiologist? Finding one that is also versed in sports medicine might be difficult =. I would try to contact the special Olympics and see if they have any recommendations for specialists you can see. I'm sure someone has encountered this before!


    I talk about all those details in my profile but the suggestion of a neurophysiologist is a new one for me.

    If I were back in Ottawa there is a great sports medicine clinic at uOttawa.
    But here there is no such specialized services available unless I go to Halifax.

    I've been using combinations of strap-on wrist and ankle weights.