Question about applying for jobs

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 23, 2011 8:26 PM GMT
    So hi there kids, I moved to New York and I'm determined to get a job in any post production, production, animation, sound production, music production, or video effects studio/house.

    I found this holy grail site filled with hundreds of the above mentioned all around New York. I've been sending emails with my resume and cover letter to any email address I can find that is relevant to any company listed.

    However, I was thinking it would be a good idea to drop by these places as well. I would walk in dress formally with a cover letter and a resume to drop off. This way they have a hard-back copy (something rare these days) and see me face to face. I think this would put me above faceless and countless emails soliciting jobs that they receive. Moreover, being compact city I could visit potentially a dozen companies a day in Manhattan.

    Is this a good idea? Or should I just keep to the emails and phone?
  • BardBear

    Posts: 533

    May 23, 2011 8:28 PM GMT
    You got it, dude. It's hard to avoid someone who is standing in front of you...but it is very easy to delete an email. Dress right, and jsut say, "I sent some stuff in, but, in case you might need a back up, here's this. Actually? Is the boss in? Can I speak with them..." you get the drill. You're right on the money.

    Then post when you get the job.

    Good luck.

    Peace,
    Bardy
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 23, 2011 9:07 PM GMT
    Thanks for the advice! =)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 23, 2011 9:17 PM GMT
    I would say, especially if you're new to NYC, that going in, looking professional, and dropping off a resume is a really good idea. I'm sure tons of people do it, so make sure you do everything A++ to show them you're the man for the job. Just walking in and dropping something off does not make them want you to come back. You have to be persistent as well. After you drop off the resume, I would follow up with a phone call anywhere from 4-10 days after. This shows a genuine interest in the job, but not like your desperate and overbearing.

    Groan... could I be more cliche? lol.

    But for real, I think in the economy you really have to play the part, fit the mold, and show them you're the best one for the job. Everyone wants to get into that field and so you need to stand out.

    On another note, NYC is a big change from LA. It's gonna be a fun time for you man!
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    May 23, 2011 9:24 PM GMT
    JAKEBENSON saidSo hi there kids, I moved to New York and I'm determined to get a job in any post production, production, animation, sound production, music production, or video effects studio/house.

    I found this holy grail site filled with hundreds of the above mentioned all around New York. I've been sending emails with my resume and cover letter to any email address I can find that is relevant to any company listed.

    However, I was thinking it would be a good idea to drop by these places as well. I would walk in dress formally with a cover letter and a resume to drop off. This way they have a hard-back copy (something rare these days) and see me face to face. I think this would put me above faceless and countless emails soliciting jobs that they receive. Moreover, being compact city I could visit potentially a dozen companies a day in Manhattan.

    Is this a good idea? Or should I just keep to the emails and phone?


    I like this idea. Not just cover letter / resume, but also a sample of your work. Well...not the one with your crazy counter video unless it's a comedy studio; too bad I'm not the execs at comedy central otherwise I'd hire you. That shit's funny!
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    May 23, 2011 9:35 PM GMT
    Remember when you are called in for the interview, I think it's a good idea to fall in love with the person interviewing you. It's like making love to the camera in the film business. Use the eye contact, smile, and think positive, loving thoughts. You'll nail it! Good luck!
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    May 23, 2011 10:20 PM GMT
    vincent7 saidRemember when you are called in for the interview, I think it's a good idea to fall in love with the person interviewing you. It's like making love to the camera in the film business. Use the eye contact, smile, and think positive, loving thoughts. You'll nail it! Good luck!


    Oh that part I'm not worried about. I'm worried about GETTING the interview to begin with.
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    May 23, 2011 11:25 PM GMT
    JAKEBENSON saidIs this a good idea? Or should I just keep to the emails and phone?

    When I was approaching talent agencies to be represented by them for voice work, I included a CD of my most recent work. Which also included a generalized 2-minute demo of my best stuff I recorded right at home, with a professional microphone: my regional accents, character & silly voices, my TV/radio news voice, my fast ad-pitch voice, my announcer voice. In my field an 8 x 10 glossy bust shot, with basic info captioned on front and printed on back, was also expected. It got me contracts.

    You've done some clever things you've shared with us here. It may be pricey (though not so much if bought in bulk), but consider sending a DVD of your work with your resume. Unless they advise they don't want them. Shows you're serious and for real, not some dreamer wannabe with his head in the clouds.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 24, 2011 1:43 AM GMT
    That is a great plan. You might also consider networking as well with like-minded folks in that industry. Consider joining some of those associations and have others look at your portfolio (or help you put the beginnings of one together). I found a couple of associations to join via LinkedIn and it has helped point me in the direction of work I want to do. Good luck in the Big Apple!
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    May 24, 2011 2:22 AM GMT
    I am not so sure. Most people (specially HR people, who are inundated by the large number of people, appointments, and phone calls they have to deal with every day) may not appreciate unannounced visits. People are bound to feel annoyed with the interruption, no matter how genuine your intentions are or how qualified you are for the job. This is also a reason why most companies do not have walk-in interviews any more, and they specifically ask not to call or visit the office directly.

    If someone unexpectedly drops by to hand their resume or to follow up at my office, I for one wont be very impressed. It's also sort of salesman-ish. Just my opinion. I have worked for big corporate offices, it may be different at companies you are looking to find a job.

    Anyway, good luck!
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    May 24, 2011 2:48 AM GMT

    I'm a recruiter (though not in NYC) and i can definitely give you a few tips if you're going to actually do this:


    1) Make sure that you're qualified for the position you're showing up for and that your resume, if given a very quick glance, clearly proves this. If you're not sure you're qualified or your resume doesn't call out "I'm perfect for this!", you're probably wasting your time.

    2) Update your resume, create a company specific cover letter, and apply online beforehand. Almost every company now has to have their specific application on file in order to proceed with an applicant. (or just likes to have it) It'll save you time, make you look more serious about working for their company, and prevent them from the easy response "here's our website, fill out an application online."

    3) Be kind and humble. You'd be surprised how many people walk into my office almost demanding to be seen and interviewed on the spot.

    4) Don't be discouraged. I'm willing to bet that very few, if any, hiring managers or recruiters will speak to you on the spot. Your resume probably won't get past the receptionist in most offices. That said, if these companies are anything like the ones i've worked for, your resume will be handed to a recruiter (maybe even with a recommendation from the receptionist, if you schmooze a bit icon_smile.gif ) and will then be one of a few resumes on their desk, rather than one of a thousand resumes floating around on the internet. It increases your chances of being considered.


    [Another thing you might want to include is a small portfolio of some of your work. (maybe just one or two projects on a cd?) ]


    Hope this helped a bit! Fill us in when you get back!
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    May 24, 2011 3:07 AM GMT


    P.S.

    I, personally, think phone calls are the worst. It's not going to do you any good because you'll get a generic response, plus, it's more likely just to be yet another interruption in that persons day. I get at LEAST 30 calls a day from people saying "I was just calling to check on the status of my application"... If i recognize your name as someone that calls often, its definitely not a good thing.

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    May 24, 2011 3:14 AM GMT
    I think you have the right idea. I would also give them a copy of some of your work to look at. Good luck to you. Be persistent. My dad always used to tell me that persistence pays off and do not get discouraged. Just go out there and get it done. I am sure you will find something soon.