Walgreens Fires Pharmacist Who Foiled Robbery By Firing Gun

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    May 24, 2011 7:05 AM GMT
    I don't even know what to think about this... was it right?

    Walgreens Fires Pharmacist Who Foiled Robbery By Firing Gun
    By MB Quirk on May 23, 2011 12:15 PM

    What some called a heroic save, Walgreens has found reason to terminate the job of a night-shift pharmacist. Jeremy Hoven fired his handgun during an armed robbery at a store in Benton Township, Mich. and was subsequently fired.

    His coworker, a manager on duty that night, thanked him with a card and included a picture of his four children, bu Hoven, who has a permit to carry concealed weapons, was given the boot after two masked gunmen fled the Walgreens when faced with shots from his gun, reports The Herald Palladium.

    He says he fired three or four shots from his revolver during the incident at 4:30 a.m. a few weeks ago. His lawyer is looking into whether or not he should pursue a wrongful termination lawsuit. The county prosecutor says he's reviewed police reports and store security video and says Hoven did nothing criminal.

    Walgreens most likely doesn't want its employees carrying guns, but does potentially saving the lives of the two managers and cashier in the store maybe change things?

    Hoven saw a manager run into a storeroom, his first tip that something was wrong, followed by a gunman running down the aisle.

    "The first thing I tried to do was dial 911 but I couldn't get it done," Hoven said. "Within seconds he was over the counter. And I'm looking at the wrong end of a 9-millimeter (gun). He was holding it gangster-style" - sideways.

    The robber jumped over the counter and was within a few feet of Hoven, in front of a cinder block wall. So Hoven decided to pull his gun and fired three to four shots. The gunman then tried to fire back but his gun didn't work for some reason, causing the robbers to flee the store.

    "I was reacting out of fear, and the adrenaline was taking over. ... You could have probably taken my pulse from my breath because my heart was beating that much," he said.

    Hoven claims he doesn't know of any specific Walgreens policy that bars employees from lawfully carrying a concealed weapon at work. He says he was surprised to be fired, and had only expected a reprimand and a transfer.

    "I have more grief over what I got from Walgreens than what I had to do to save my life ... and save my co-workers," he said.

    http://consumerist.com/2011/05/walgreens-fires-night-shift-pharmacist-who-foiled-robbery-by-firing-gun.html
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    May 24, 2011 12:23 PM GMT
    The gunman then tried to fire back but his gun didn't work for some reason

    Dude is lucky to be alive.
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    May 24, 2011 12:44 PM GMT
    Hoven saw a manager run into a storeroom, his first tip that something was wrong, followed by a gunman running down the aisle.


    They are all lucky to be alive.

    This is why it's very important to dial 911 immediately. Because when just a few brief seconds stand between your life and your death, the police are only 5-10 minutes away.
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    May 24, 2011 1:09 PM GMT
    SportingChance saidThis is why it's very important to dial 911 immediately. Because when just a few brief seconds stand between your life and your death, the police are only 5-10 minutes away.

    Dialing 911 can be a lifesaver, but it can also be nothing more than your epitaph, and at least perhaps help to capture your killers. Even 5-10 minutes isn't fast enough when you're facing a loaded gun that can kill in an instant. And while that response time is ideal, it's not always met.

    When my partner & I were mugged in our parking lot at night by 2 young men (I beat them off with my cane, and by shouting "POLICE!" loud enough to bring our condo neighbors to their balconies), I phoned 911 as they fled. After nearly 30 minutes had passed and no police showed, despite the 911 dispatcher telling me they were being sent, I phoned back and said just cancel it.

    I was tired of waiting outside, and wanted to get to our condo and just rest. My partner had actually been punched and knocked to the ground, and I had sent him inside already, so I also wanted to see how he and his jaw were doing. It was sore for a few days, but he was otherwise OK.
  • Celticmusl

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    May 24, 2011 1:21 PM GMT
    pre_mortem saidThe gunman then tried to fire back but his gun didn't work for some reason

    Dude is lucky to be alive.



    Yep. Not sure if I want a drugged out pharmacist carrying a gun at work. I worked at a pharmacy during high school and beginning college, and by the time I left there at least 50% of the pharmacists had been fired for drug abuse, and one was arrested by the FBI because she was involved in an international drug ring. This was in a small mayberry-like town.
  • iHavok

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    May 24, 2011 1:24 PM GMT
    When I was young and managed a restaurant in the midwest I'd have to reprimand employees for chasing after customer's who cut out on their check. No dollar is ever worth anyone's life. Give them what they want so they leave, it's insured, and way easier to replace than being shot.

    He's freaking lucky the dude had issues with his gun.
    If the store's policy is to cooperate, and the store is notorious for having these issues (as indicated by the Dec 07 robbery attempt), he should have transferred, not being acting all vigilante.
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    May 24, 2011 1:37 PM GMT
    and if he mis-fired and shot a customer... multimillion dollar lawsuit, ten times that in bad publicity

    They did the right thing by firing him in my opinion, maybe they could have gotten away with a suspension and warnings etc
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    May 24, 2011 2:05 PM GMT
    MsclDrew saidand if he mis-fired and shot a customer... multimillion dollar lawsuit, ten times that in bad publicity

    They did the right thing by firing him in my opinion, maybe they could have gotten away with a suspension and warnings etc


    I agree with McslDrew on this one. I worked for Walgreens for 15 years and the policy is to give them whatever they are after and get them out of the store and let the police handle it. I was shocked that he would even have a gun at work because they also have a no weapons policy. If this guy went directly to the pharmacy, it was more than likely he was after drugs and not money. Someone who is robbing a store for drugs is not one to mess with. Gun or no gun.
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    May 24, 2011 2:15 PM GMT
    Celticmusl said
    pre_mortem saidThe gunman then tried to fire back but his gun didn't work for some reason

    Dude is lucky to be alive.



    Yep. Not sure if I want a drugged out pharmacist carrying a gun at work. I worked at a pharmacy during high school and beginning college, and by the time I left there at least 50% of the pharmacists had been fired for drug abuse, and one was arrested by the FBI because she was involved in an international drug ring. This was in a small mayberry-like town.


    You mean people are starting to realize that drug dealers (even ones with the title "pharmacist") use drugs too?

    I agree with the pharmacist on this one. If someone is coming into your place of business slinging a gun around, shoot them in the face. Twice. You may get fired, but at least you're not dead.

    It's amazing how people were bitching that the McDonalds employees didn't do anything to stop someone from getting beaten up a month ago, yet now are saying this employee shouldn't have intervened when he could when someone was holding a fucking gun to another person's face. Unbelievable. icon_rolleyes.gif
  • iHavok

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    May 24, 2011 2:18 PM GMT
    Not that it makes much difference, but I have no problems with the way the employees behaved in the McDonalds incident...
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    May 24, 2011 2:35 PM GMT
    Dude needs to learn how to aim.
  • SkyMiles

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    May 24, 2011 2:38 PM GMT
    I do think it's sick when a company pretends that certain jobs they have their employees do aren't dangerous when they obviously are -- liquor and drug stores, or almost anything as late at night as this guy was working. And if you do work a dangerous job I can hardly blame you for carrying a gun.

    The other side of it is, no company in the world is going to encourage people who work for them to get into a gun fight if someone comes to rob the place. WAY too much liability if someone gets killed.

    Companies that do put employees in harm's way should at least acknowledge the fact and provide decent security though. That's probably an extra $ they're not going to spend. :/
  • wellwell

    Posts: 2265

    May 24, 2011 2:42 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidDude needs to learn how to aim.


    Ya, it seems like the pharmacist's aim was pretty bad! Perhaps he should spend more time @ the target range.
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    May 24, 2011 6:48 PM GMT
    As a pharmacist I take offense to your incorrect generalization that pharmacists are drugged out. In order to be a pharmacist you have to get an undergrad degree and go to pharmacy school (which is four years the same length as medical school) and when youre finished your get a Doctor of Pharmacy degree (Pharm.D)

    Pharmacists have been known to abuse medications since because there is such easy access when you are the person in control of them, however those pharmacists are BY FAR the minority.

    I'd imagine that there are similar rates of abuse by physicians compared to pharmacists. Don't let your experience in ONE location define your perception of the entire profession.

    I do agree that the should not bring guns into work-- where I interned at the corporate policy was that no guns were allowed to be carried by staff members (even if the had a permit to legally carry it).


    Celticmusl said
    pre_mortem saidThe gunman then tried to fire back but his gun didn't work for some reason

    Dude is lucky to be alive.



    Yep. Not sure if I want a drugged out pharmacist carrying a gun at work. I worked at a pharmacy during high school and beginning college, and by the time I left there at least 50% of the pharmacists had been fired for drug abuse, and one was arrested by the FBI because she was involved in an international drug ring. This was in a small mayberry-like town.
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    May 24, 2011 7:23 PM GMT
    I remember hearing a story at work about how my manager fired an employee because he ran after a thief and tackled him to the ground. Supposedly, the thief was still technically a "customer" in the store, so the employee shouldn't have gotten physical. Instead, he should've called security.

    But I find it ridiculous how someone can get fired for defending the store that's getting robbed.
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    May 24, 2011 8:59 PM GMT
    Too bad he is such a poor shot.
  • Anto

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    May 24, 2011 9:52 PM GMT
    Maybe the guy should counter sue Walgreen's for not providing proper security to protect it's employee's and customers?
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    May 24, 2011 10:48 PM GMT
    ak11187 saidAs a pharmacist I take offense to your incorrect generalization that pharmacists are drugged out. In order to be a pharmacist you have to get an undergrad degree and go to pharmacy school (which is four years the same length as medical school) and when youre finished your get a Doctor of Pharmacy degree (Pharm.D)

    Pharmacists have been known to abuse medications since because there is such easy access when you are the person in control of them, however those pharmacists are BY FAR the minority.

    I'd imagine that there are similar rates of abuse by physicians compared to pharmacists. Don't let your experience in ONE location define your perception of the entire profession.


    So, how do you manage to type and self-administer at the same time?
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    May 25, 2011 1:28 AM GMT
    Mil8 said
    ak11187 saidAs a pharmacist I take offense to your incorrect generalization that pharmacists are drugged out. In order to be a pharmacist you have to get an undergrad degree and go to pharmacy school (which is four years the same length as medical school) and when youre finished your get a Doctor of Pharmacy degree (Pharm.D)

    Pharmacists have been known to abuse medications since because there is such easy access when you are the person in control of them, however those pharmacists are BY FAR the minority.

    I'd imagine that there are similar rates of abuse by physicians compared to pharmacists. Don't let your experience in ONE location define your perception of the entire profession.


    So, how do you manage to type and self-administer at the same time?


    The uppers help to counteract the sedatives. icon_lol.gif
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    May 25, 2011 2:02 AM GMT
    Solution- This happened late at night. Don't have 24 hour pharmacies in ghettos like Benton Harbor, MI.
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    May 25, 2011 2:17 AM GMT




    AMERICA,




    GUNS,




    LOL
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    May 25, 2011 2:19 AM GMT
    Iceblink saidSolution- This happened late at night. Don't have 24 hour pharmacies in ghettos like Benton Harbor, MI.
    Additional solution - don't let people have guns.
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    May 25, 2011 2:43 AM GMT
    Anduru said
    Iceblink saidSolution- This happened late at night. Don't have 24 hour pharmacies in ghettos like Benton Harbor, MI.
    Additional solution - don't let people have guns.


    It sounds like the gun is what saved the life of this man. You could argue that the people robbing the store had a gun, which helped lead to the problem, but I highly doubt the potential thief bought the gun through a legitimate means. Who would be dumb enough to rob a store with a gun they're licensed to own?
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    May 25, 2011 4:32 AM GMT
    Celticmusl said
    pre_mortem saidThe gunman then tried to fire back but his gun didn't work for some reason

    Dude is lucky to be alive.



    Yep. Not sure if I want a drugged out pharmacist carrying a gun at work. I worked at a pharmacy during high school and beginning college, and by the time I left there at least 50% of the pharmacists had been fired for drug abuse, and one was arrested by the FBI because she was involved in an international drug ring. This was in a small mayberry-like town.


    I'm quite sure I don't want a "drugged out pharmacist" carrying a gun anywhere.

    I'm also quite sure I don't want a drugged out thief assaulting store employees at gunpoint. Yet, there apparently was one in this store.

    People want a lot of things.
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    May 25, 2011 11:42 AM GMT
    Pyrotech saidIt sounds like the gun is what saved the life of this man. You could argue that the people robbing the store had a gun, which helped lead to the problem, but I highly doubt the potential thief bought the gun through a legitimate means. Who would be dumb enough to rob a store with a gun they're licensed to own?
    If you didn't have abajillion guns lying around it wouldn't be easy for them to find a gun in the first place.