Photography course

  • alves_2010

    Posts: 15

    May 25, 2011 9:58 PM GMT

    Hey guys,

    im moving to Montreal in August to learn french,

    and id like to do a photography course,

    does anyone knows, a good one in Mtl??

    Id be glad if someone could give me any tips about it!

    Thanks! icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 25, 2011 10:03 PM GMT
    Buy a fucking DSLR and figure it out. icon_razz.gif
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    May 25, 2011 10:04 PM GMT
    Oh, and I would take photography classes to learn more stuff, but I really don't feel like paying $50K+ on school just to learn about the history of photography. I'd much rather learn more business skills to better sell the work I already do. icon_wink.gif
    http://www.paulbryson.com
  • alves_2010

    Posts: 15

    May 25, 2011 10:13 PM GMT
    Thanks man, but i wanna spend money with classes, i think it will worth!

    If somone could tell any places, that would be nice!
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    May 25, 2011 10:16 PM GMT
    I don't know about Montreal, but I do know that hanging around places where photographers hang out would be a great way to find out.

    Hint: Small airports...almost all photographers love aerial photography. icon_wink.gif
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    May 25, 2011 10:23 PM GMT
    I kind of loathed my b&w college photography course. Standing in line with a bunch of assholes to soak my damn prints and develop them. It was also expensive as FUCK. Film, paper, accessories like retouching brushes and ink, the actual SLR, I spent like over a grand on that not including the actual cost of the class.
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    May 25, 2011 10:24 PM GMT
    Ariodante saidI kind of loathed my b&w college photography course. Standing in line with a bunch of assholes to soak my damn prints and develop them. It was also expensive as FUCK. Film, paper, accessories like retouching brushes and ink, the actual SLR, I spent like over a grand on that not including the actual cost of the class.
    Hell a grand barely puts a downpayment on a lens. icon_lol.gif
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    May 25, 2011 10:40 PM GMT
    why are lens so damn expensive!! the best lens i could get for my video camera was off ebay and barely does what I want it to do
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    May 26, 2011 12:30 AM GMT
    rosco87 saidwhy are lens so damn expensive!!
    Because the more precise the glass is machined, the more light it puts on each individual pixel. This is what allows you to create a large roadside billboard with an image from a 1 megapixel sensor, with perfect clarity.

    Also, with more light available for each pixel, that means less overall light is required for sharp images, so you can use a higher shutter speed and lower ISO while maintaining your required depth of field.

    That's why...cheap (<$1000) lenses only work till you're printing large images. icon_wink.gif
  • Eric_the_Red

    Posts: 21

    May 26, 2011 4:07 AM GMT
    1. Ignore everything paulflexes has posted. Most of it is just wrong. But I will not get started.

    Well maybe a little. icon_wink.gif

    In any modern digital camera two important factors to consider are
    a) Sensor size (large sensor size gives more light per pixel which means better low light performance (higher ISO) and less noise.) This is why DSLRs have superior low light photos.
    b) F-stop of lens - F-stop inversely corresponds to the amount of light that reaches sensor - The lower the F-stop the more light that reaches the sensor. It also has the effect that a lower F-stop limits the depth of field which can be used for artist expression. This limited depth of field is more pronounced with larger sensor sizes.

    I'll also say that I like to print my pictures large by most peoples standards 20 by 30 inches and have gotten great enlargements from an old nikon SLR from the 60s, a sub 200 dollar point and shoot, and my new fancy dSLR. For most things in any size you are likely to print in your equipment will not make much difference.

    Anyway if you are printing billboards the IQ180 (http://www.phaseone.com/en/Digital-Backs/IQ180/IQ180-Info.aspx) is what professional are currently using which is a medium format sensor (larger then dSLR) that comes in at 80 megapixels and costs $44000 for just the sensor without the camera and lens.

    More expensive lens don't give better photos. But usually correspond to either needing more elements of glass or a more precise glass elements. More precise glass elements are need to go to lower f-stops. More glass elements are need in zoom lens, ultra-wide lens, and telephoto lens.

    Now back to alves_2010

    2. You didn't say if you have a camera or what type of camera you have digital or film. Point and Shoot, SLR, or large format. Different classes will have different requirements for equipment. So that can make a big difference.

    3. Instead of a class I would suggest if you are just starting out if you have a digital camera to just out and shoot. It is the quickest way to improve and find your own style. I would also checkout some pages on the web I specifically like the articles on

    Ken Rockwell - How to Take Better Pictures
    http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech.htm

    4. If you don't have a camera and you are just getting started I would suggest a Canon S95. I have both this and a dSLR both take great photos but I can put the S95 in my pocket and always have it with me.

    Well hopefully this helps and clears up any confusion. Hopefully I didn't rant too much.





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    May 26, 2011 4:12 AM GMT
    Eric_the_Red said1. Ignore everything paulflexes has posted. Most of it is just wrong. But I will not get started.

    Well maybe a little. icon_wink.gif

    In any modern digital camera two important factors to consider are
    a) Sensor size (large sensor size gives more light per pixel which means better low light performance (higher ISO) and less noise.) This is why DSLRs have superior low light photos.
    b) F-stop of lens - F-stop inversely corresponds to the amount of light that reaches sensor - The lower the F-stop the more light that reaches the sensor. It also has the effect that a lower F-stop limits the depth of field which can be used for artist expression. This limited depth of field is more pronounced with larger sensor sizes.

    I'll also say that I like to print my pictures large by most peoples standards 20 by 30 inches and have gotten great enlargements from an old nikon SLR from the 60s, a sub 200 dollar point and shoot, and my new fancy dSLR. For most things in any size you are likely to print in your equipment will not make much difference.

    Anyway if you are printing billboards the IQ180 (http://www.phaseone.com/en/Digital-Backs/IQ180/IQ180-Info.aspx) is what professional are currently using which is a medium format sensor (larger then dSLR) that comes in at 80 megapixels and costs $44000 for just the sensor without the camera and lens.

    More expensive lens don't give better photos. But usually correspond to either needing more elements of glass or a more precise glass elements. More precise glass elements are need to go to lower f-stops. More glass elements are need in zoom lens, ultra-wide lens, and telephoto lens.

    Now back to alves_2010

    2. You didn't say if you have a camera or what type of camera you have digital or film. Point and Shoot, SLR, or large format. Different classes will have different requirements for equipment. So that can make a big difference.

    3. Instead of a class I would suggest if you are just starting out if you have a digital camera to just out and shoot. It is the quickest way to improve and find your own style. I would also checkout some pages on the web I specifically like the articles on

    Ken Rockwell - How to Take Better Pictures
    http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech.htm

    4. If you don't have a camera and you are just getting started I would suggest a Canon S95. I have both this and a dSLR both take great photos but I can put the S95 in my pocket and always have it with me.

    Well hopefully this helps and clears up any confusion. Hopefully I didn't rant too much.





    You can go fuck yourself.
    Research the Hubble Space Telescope, and find out what pixels its original sensor had.
    Then research what glass it used (and the cost of that glass, which exceeded $1mil).

    PS. I've gotten a 20x30 FOOT billboard made from my Nikon D70S...and that's the low end of its capability. icon_wink.gif

    Oh yeah, and Ken Rockwell sucks baws.
  • alves_2010

    Posts: 15

    May 26, 2011 4:21 AM GMT
    Thank you for helping...

    Well, i have a Sony H20, I dont know much about photography, so thats why i wanna take classes, and buy a good camera.

    Thanks Eric for the tips!

    Ps: Mr Paulflexes is really polite! icon_eek.gif
  • Eric_the_Red

    Posts: 21

    May 26, 2011 4:49 AM GMT
    [quote][cite]Well, i have a Sony H20[/quote]

    I would just go with that to start. Set it to Auto and take some pictures.

    In all reality when starting out a more complex camera dSLR or advanced point and shoot could actually be a determent to making good photos. When starting out you need to pay attention to your subject and not have to worry about fiddling with the camera. I think the best description of photography is that while painting is the art of inclusion photography is the art of exclusion.

    If you don't believe me take a look at the free preview of this book on Amazon. All the photos were taken with an iPhone.
    The Best Camera Is The One That's With You: iPhone Photography by Chase Jarvis
    http://www.amazon.com/Best-Camera-One-Thats-You/dp/0321684788

  • Judas05

    Posts: 29

    May 26, 2011 4:54 AM GMT
    A cannon rebel is a good camera for starters. It's pretty affordable and cheaper in cost. I'm a professional fashion and glamour photographer. Let me know if you have questions!

    You can look at my work on my site www.GinoBaileau.com
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    Jul 24, 2012 4:00 AM GMT
    I just upgraded to a better camera and shot a whole bunch of pics of a cute (straight) friend. icon_smile.gif

    I've had a digital camera for 12 years, but the point-and-shoot kind. This is my first upgrade.

    I have been to some of the online photography forum sites, and posted pics for feedback, but I have found that on those sites, the feedback is not helpful at all. So many of the people are very mean and trifling. I know my pics are not technically perfect, but Nick looks cute in them, he's in good focus, the backgrounds are varied and interesting... I can defend them all day, but I get absolutely zero positivity from the people in the forums.

    So, there's not a lot of resources/help if you're learning yourself, online.

    What people have suggested to me is to find a park district, community college, or other "low key" place to take a class. Sometimes even the YMCA offers a series of classes for hobbies, in the $25-$100 range. I think it's good advice and I'll do that eventually. That's I'm sure where some kinder people are who can be constructive instead of being just critical and territorial.
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    Jul 24, 2012 4:07 AM GMT
    Lenses would be a much better investment than classes.
  • Jasonblue

    Posts: 287

    Jul 24, 2012 4:08 AM GMT
    I started off with a Rebel. Photoshop was also a requirement, so be prepared to spend some extra $$.
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    Jul 24, 2012 7:19 AM GMT
    Instagram, and other similar iphone app hipster nonsense.

    tumblr_lxvnewgUN41qz9re5o1_500.gif