Too much muscle and Heart Health. Lack of research, seeking opinons.

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    May 29, 2011 11:37 PM GMT
    I did a few literature searches using 'too much muscle and health' and 'too much lean mass and health' through academic search complete, pubmed, and google scholar and couldn't find any studies.

    Therefore, let's ask the lay audience: do you think too much lean mass could be unhealthy?

    My opinion is: yes it can be. My theory: your heart, if not conditioned to increase its efficiency by continuing aerobic exercise while you are becoming more vascular and massive will have to work harder to pump blood throughout the body. Additionally, the amount of glucose you must intake must also be transported to the tissue, allowing more glycosylation of blood vessels on the way. Does this happen often? I think it happens often with steroid use/abuse, but I doubt it happens unless you are on the extreme.

    Yes, the benefits of staying active outweigh the risks of the unknown at this point, but anyone know how long bodybuilders live (extremists in adding mass), vs marathoners/triathletes (extremists in endurance ex), and vs the healthy gym-going, moderate runner? I think the moderate runner/gym weightlifter would be healthier and live longer than any of the former.

    All opinion, speculation, and hypotheses by me.
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    May 30, 2011 2:00 AM GMT
    Too many scientific words D:
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    May 30, 2011 2:23 AM GMT
    I think you're stalking me, get on Aion and let's talk it over in Vent icon_smile.gif
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    May 30, 2011 2:28 AM GMT
    So when you gain muscle mass your body develops more veins/arteries in order to supply nutrition. The additional vascularization creates added friction for the blood supply when it's pumped which ends up adding stress to the heart.

    This is actually something we discussed in one of my bio classes, hope it makes sense/helps.
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    May 30, 2011 3:17 AM GMT
    Yes this is true. The vascularization also depends on the aerobic training...an adaptation is switch to more type I fiber hybridization (which are thinner in diameter) and more blood vessels: eg from 4 per cross sectional area of each fiber to 6.
    Thinking about this makes me never want to stop aerobic fitness for any reason...
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    May 30, 2011 3:18 AM GMT
    I'm not stalking you. I just made a return to RJ from a 2 year break and you just so happen to be active icon_smile.gif
  • starboard5

    Posts: 969

    May 30, 2011 3:26 AM GMT
    This may be slightly off topic, bluey, but I believe there have been studies in recent years showing a correlation between increases in longevity and being chronically slightly underfed. Do you know anything about that?
  • ncaahockey

    Posts: 59

    May 30, 2011 3:37 AM GMT
    Bluey

    I have discussed this topic when I was taking physiology back in school. We talked about how muscle fibers grow and become larger (including the heart), but at the same time the whole system becomes much more efficient. Cells transport O2 and waste easier, lungs exchange O2 and waste easier, the heart is stronger and able to pump more blood more efficiently with each contraction.

    The only time I believe that this becomes a problem is when you introduce steroids and other enhancers into the system.. These additives are artificial and they cause the body to grow beyond it's natural development parameters. I believe this is why you see so many body builders having cardiac problems as they age, while people that just exercise tend to live longer healthier life styles.
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    May 30, 2011 6:53 AM GMT
    starboard5 saidThis may be slightly off topic, bluey, but I believe there have been studies in recent years showing a correlation between increases in longevity and being chronically slightly underfed. Do you know anything about that?


    Yes, I've heard about those studies in multiple classes...even starting as early as my freshman year in undergrad...
    They were feeding mice 30% less than normal.
    There are communities that do this, but they tend to lose their sex drive from what I hear. The mice probably aren't being exposed to immune-system challenges like the flu, which being underfed might pose a problem in fighting. My opinion again...

    Good comment about the steroids. I agree too. Just sometimes I think that when I was swimming I felt so healthy and could go non-stop--this was extremely helpful in water polo. No one had more stamina than me. But, these days I get winded much quicker as a trade off for having bigger, stronger muscles...primarily pecs in my case. Yet, I hate training cardio or swimming nonstop these days.
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    May 30, 2011 6:58 AM GMT
    bluey2223 said
    starboard5 saidThis may be slightly off topic, bluey, but I believe there have been studies in recent years showing a correlation between increases in longevity and being chronically slightly underfed. Do you know anything about that?


    Yes, I've heard about those studies in multiple classes...even starting as early as my freshman year in undergrad...
    They were feeding mice 30% less than normal.
    There are communities that do this, but they tend to lose their sex drive from what I hear. The mice probably aren't being exposed to immune-system challenges like the flu, which being underfed might pose a problem in fighting. My opinion again...

    Good comment about the steroids. I agree too. Just sometimes I think that when I was swimming I felt so healthy and could go non-stop--this was extremely helpful in water polo. No one had more stamina than me. But, these days I get winded much quicker as a trade off for having bigger, stronger muscles...primarily pecs in my case. Yet, I hate training cardio or swimming nonstop these days.


    I like your pecs.... what was the topic here?
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    May 13, 2012 9:40 PM GMT
    A year later, and I still don't have an answer to this question. Some of the PhDs who taught me think so, but nothing other than speculation.