Romance Under the Stars

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    Jun 01, 2011 6:17 AM GMT
    What's a nice place to camp and sleep under a star-filled sky?

    The Milky Way over Yosemite NP, CA. I've been there briefly one morning.
    MilkyWay over Yosemite
  • ArmsandLegs

    Posts: 125

    Jun 01, 2011 4:04 PM GMT
    The desolate wilderness in western Wyoming, just east of Yellowstone National Park. I've never seen so many stars before, there's no city lights for hundreds of miles to interfere with the natural beauty.
    I've also heard that central easterrn Nevada has the darkest skies in the nation, but I haven't experienced it yet personally.
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    Jun 01, 2011 5:52 PM GMT
    Big Island of Hawaii! Make sure you stay on the Kohala Coast. I was just there this past March, and I thought I was in a planetarium. I never saw that many stars before!! Go when there's a new moon icon_smile.gif
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    Jun 01, 2011 6:13 PM GMT
    ArmsandLegs saidI've also heard that central easterrn Nevada has the darkest skies in the nation, but I haven't experienced it yet personally.

    I'm not sure how one sky can be darker than another, aside from there being no light pollution from human settlement, and no air pollution. Both conditions degrade the stars you can see.

    One of the best places was our family's summer cabin in Vermont, at the top of a hill. Not real high, less than 2000 feet, but still less atmosphere above us, and no city lights for many miles. It was the first time I ever saw the Milky Way.

    I remember being awed by the stars at night the first time we went there in 1957, age 8. And each night I saw this wispy cloud in the same location, and wondered how that could be, and why it didn't move. Well, DUH! Finally it dawned on me that it was the Milky Way, like the photo in the OP.

    Other places I've seen lots of stars was camping in Washington State, and in North Dakota. I even saw the Aurora there, though usually that was in the Winter, below zero and way too cold for camping.
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    Jun 01, 2011 9:18 PM GMT
    Actually, there was a show on PBS I think that discussed this very topic. Yes, there are certain parts of the world is the most darkest. I think it is on a scale from 1-10. However, there are only two places that reached near darkness, So, I can imagine seeing the stars there must be incredible. icon_eek.gif
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    Jun 09, 2011 6:33 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    ArmsandLegs saidI've also heard that central easterrn Nevada has the darkest skies in the nation, but I haven't experienced it yet personally.

    I'm not sure how one sky can be darker than another, aside from there being no light pollution from human settlement, and no air pollution. Both conditions degrade the stars you can see.

    One of the best places was our family's summer cabin in Vermont, at the top of a hill. Not real high, less than 2000 feet, but still less atmosphere above us, and no city lights for many miles. It was the first time I ever saw the Milky Way.

    I remember being awed by the stars at night the first time we went there in 1957, age 8. And each night I saw this wispy cloud in the same location, and wondered how that could be, and why it didn't move. Well, DUH! Finally it dawned on me that it was the Milky Way, like the photo in the OP.

    Other places I've seen lots of stars would was camping in Washington State, and in North Dakota. I even saw the Aurora there, though usually that was in the Winter, below zero and way too cold for camping.


    Depending on the location and time, other natural nighttime light sources include airglow, the zodiacal light (below), and the gegenschein.

    Zodiacal Light Seen from Paranal

    The National Park Service acknowledges light pollution.
    Look at how much light pollution has increased since the 50s.

    Cinzano4panel.jpg
  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    Jun 09, 2011 6:43 AM GMT
    If you and me went campin and you woke up the next mornin with your ass burning and greased up would ya tell anyone? No?...wanna go campin???????.....BUD
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    Jun 09, 2011 7:12 AM GMT
    Desert islands rocks in the middle of the sea on a beach by a campfire... yes Ive done that.. make sure to bring someting warm... it gets cold at sea at night
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    Jun 09, 2011 7:12 AM GMT
    javalava said
    Art_Deco said
    ArmsandLegs saidI've also heard that central easterrn Nevada has the darkest skies in the nation, but I haven't experienced it yet personally.

    I'm not sure how one sky can be darker than another, aside from there being no light pollution from human settlement, and no air pollution. Both conditions degrade the stars you can see.

    One of the best places was our family's summer cabin in Vermont, at the top of a hill. Not real high, less than 2000 feet, but still less atmosphere above us, and no city lights for many miles. It was the first time I ever saw the Milky Way.

    I remember being awed by the stars at night the first time we went there in 1957, age 8. And each night I saw this wispy cloud in the same location, and wondered how that could be, and why it didn't move. Well, DUH! Finally it dawned on me that it was the Milky Way, like the photo in the OP.

    Other places I've seen lots of stars would was camping in Washington State, and in North Dakota. I even saw the Aurora there, though usually that was in the Winter, below zero and way too cold for camping.


    Depending on the location and time, other natural nighttime light sources include airglow, the zodiacal light (below), and the gegenschein.

    Zodiacal Light Seen from Paranal

    Fortunately, the National Park Service acknowledges light pollution.
    Look at how much light pollution has increased since the 50s.

    Cinzano4panel.jpg


    Thats horrendous!
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    Jun 09, 2011 7:59 AM GMT
    floridajockguy saidActually, there was a show on PBS I think that discussed this very topic. Yes, there are certain parts of the world is the most darkest. I think it is on a scale from 1-10. However, there are only two places that reached near darkness, So, I can imagine seeing the stars there must be incredible. icon_eek.gif


    Interesting. Do you remember the title? Did it refer to this Bortle Dark-Sky Scale (of 1 to 9)?
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    Jun 09, 2011 2:20 PM GMT
    The best I've seen was when I was in China, once on a train at night, and once on a ferry in the middle of the sea. Not that I think those help, but thought I'd let you know.
    It's really a shame with all the light pollution these days you really don't see images like the ones you posted anymore.
    I'd like to know, as well. Love the stars.
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    Sep 24, 2011 8:41 PM GMT
    Under the Milky Way - The Church



    Looking up at the night's sky while camping in the deserts of Australia and Jordan and just listening to nothing.

    Feeling like you're the only person left on the planet.

    Unforgetable.
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    Sep 24, 2011 8:48 PM GMT
    javalava saidWhat's a nice place to camp and sleep under a star-filled sky?

    The Milky Way over Yosemite NP, CA. I've been there briefly one morning.
    MilkyWay over Yosemite


    Oooo gorgeous....
  • SirEllingtonB...

    Posts: 497

    Sep 24, 2011 9:13 PM GMT
    javalava saidWhat's a nice place to camp and sleep under a star-filled sky?

    The Milky Way over Yosemite NP, CA. I've been there briefly one morning.
    MilkyWay over Yosemite


    Added to my list. I really like camping out in Vermont, specifically near Bellow Falls.