The hardest part about working out…

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 03, 2011 4:24 AM GMT
    Ok, so if it isn’t obvious I’m not the type that’s been into sports or exercise his whole life like so many here. So I recently decided to make a change and start working out regularly. Crazily I decided to start by trying the P90X work out. Now initial physical torture aside my two biggest problems are 1) Consistency and 2) Positive mindset.

    The former speaks for itself in that the hardest part is getting up and taking the time to do it. As for the latter I have depression and have a hard time seeing myself improving and still see myself as weak. Anyone out there got some pro tips for a weak newbie to help overcome these obstacles? They’d be greatly appreciated.
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Jun 03, 2011 5:41 AM GMT
    1) Many will argue, but I say skip the initial physical torture. When you gradually build up strength and stamina, I guarantee you'll start craving the feeling you get from a hard workout and you'll wish you had more time and energy to do it.

    2) With the above in mind...just show up and do something..anything. I guarantee you'll feel better not worse. Exercise is proven to be one of the most effective treatments for depression. Just get the ball rolling and all the obstacles will fade away. Break a sweat every day. Even if the depression doesn't entirely resolve, you will feel better physically, and feel better about yourself for your efforts.

    You're already an attractive young man. I'm not saying it's easy..but easier, to start lean and build muscle than to have a lot of excess weight to lose when you are beginning. Read up about nutrition....right here. It's as important as your workouts for your health and for building. It's science at this point. That should appeal to your nature. Your body is now a long term experiment. Observe the cause and effect and go anywhere you want. This site is a great resource.

    peace
  • Profire

    Posts: 224

    Jun 03, 2011 11:11 AM GMT
    Wild_sky360 couldn't have said it better.

    I suffer from depression and consider strenuous workouts part of my "meds".
    Keep it up. It helps with confidence, depression, self perception and feeling better.

    Lastly, make working out something you enjoy. If you enjoy what you are doing you will more likely keep it up
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 03, 2011 11:27 AM GMT
    My dick!
    Come on it's a gym full of straight sweaty muscle hotties, I cant help it... It gets rock hard.
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    Jun 03, 2011 11:32 AM GMT
    Depression? What you have to be depressed about, Pro?

    Most difficult for me is getting into the groove......once I'm into it, it's hard to stop....

    Past week my left foot has been bothering me...as soon as that cleared up, my right wrist trying to tell me it has carpel tunnel syndrome...which it hasn't...Shut Up!

    Lol...... icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 03, 2011 11:36 AM GMT
    My workouts definitely affect my mood and energy in a positive way which is one of the reasons that I try not to skip. It's definitely better to have a bad or short workout rather than none at all - I've had lots of lame ones.

    If you can't do the workout maybe you can just listen to your music and walk for 20 or 30 minutes. If you really feel too down to do anything don't feel bad about it - I had a job once that took up all my time and I didn't train for almost 5 years - I felt terrible about it which was totally useless.

    Do it in your own time - a slow start with a desire to make it work is all you need and you already have that - good luck
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 03, 2011 1:49 PM GMT
    P90X is a very difficult workout and tough to stick with it, but worth it.
    If you can't make it, use the workout plans here or over at www.BodyBuilding.com - for all ages and stages.
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Jun 03, 2011 2:40 PM GMT
    P.S.
    Don't feel like you've missed the boat already...couldn't be further from the truth. You are currently near the peak of your body's production of growth hormone and testosterone, both of which greatly amplify whatever level of effort you can put into this.
    Keep this in mind as a motivator. Take the most advantage that you can of this window. You've got about 10 years to build a good base with these advantages. Then you gradually need work both harder and smarter to get the same results.

    CHIdude makes a great point. The eye candy alone is worth the price of a membership somewhere. It's another motivator for maintaining a routine and goal setting. I used to live in Seattle and then near you. LA Fitness at Mill Creek has some of the most beautiful men I've seen in a gym. If you can swing $30 month, it's only a few minutes away, and one of the best values out there. Not sure about the financial commitment?..LA, and a half dozen others in the area will give you anywhere from a few days to a few weeks for free to try. Try them all, in sequence, and before you've finished up at the last one, you'll be getting phone calls from all the others, sweetening the deal they offered when you first walked in.

    Joining a well equipped club like that has other newbie advantages too. They have circuits of machines that safely work every major muscle group. Some people never move on from the circuit and still get great results. A pro will show you how to use them properly as part of free orientation, but they all have ez to read diagrams on them too. Don't let the learning curve delay you. You can jump right into the circuit without a lot of knowledge. Try them all, safely, with super light weights, or no weights, just to get the feel of the movements. It might feel silly at first, but hit them all and you'll be surprised how good a workout that can be when you're just getting started.

    Don't be self conscious about the light weights. You will quickly find your favorite machines, build a routine, and start adding weights safely after you get the proper form down. Aside from all the buff dudes, what also gets me motivated is seeing all the newbies too...struggling with a hundred pounds they need to lose...or totally scrawny and weak...or the guy who finally quit smoking after his first heart attack. It's nothing to snicker at, and I've never seen that happen to anyone. I'm impressed by someone having the balls to take charge of is life and his health despite all the objections and obstacles and fear and ignorance. I've seen people make incredible transformations in just a few months. That initial success is very empowering and motivating. Have patience and do it right. NO INJURIES is your mantra right now. It's one of the top reasons people quit..along with the ass kicking you described from your current routine. 6 months from now you'll crave the burn, but it's working against your odds in the beginning.

    You can take this as far as you want...all the way to competition if that's your thing. The only thing stopping you, is getting started; and injury if you jump in too gung ho without knowledge and some basic conditioning.

    HTH
    peace
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 03, 2011 3:28 PM GMT
    wild_sky360 said1) ...just show up and do something..anything. I guarantee you'll feel better not worse.



    ^^^^^
    This. Just go and do something. You'll get more comfortable and get to where you can't wait to go.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 04, 2011 3:01 AM GMT
    wild_sky360 said1) Many will argue, but I say skip the initial physical torture. When you gradually build up strength and stamina, I guarantee you'll start craving the feeling you get from a hard workout and you'll wish you had more time and energy to do it.

    2) With the above in mind...just show up and do something..anything. I guarantee you'll feel better not worse. Exercise is proven to be one of the most effective treatments for depression. Just get the ball rolling and all the obstacles will fade away. Break a sweat every day. Even if the depression doesn't entirely resolve, you will feel better physically, and feel better about yourself for your efforts.

    You're already an attractive young man. I'm not saying it's easy..but easier, to start lean and build muscle than to have a lot of excess weight to lose when you are beginning. Read up about nutrition....right here. It's as important as your workouts for your health and for building. It's science at this point. That should appeal to your nature. Your body is now a long term experiment. Observe the cause and effect and go anywhere you want. This site is a great resource.

    peace


    +1
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 04, 2011 3:59 AM GMT
    Y_R_E_Wanna_B saidAnyone out there got some pro tips for a weak newbie to help overcome these obstacles?
    Yes. Stop seeing yourself as weak. icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 04, 2011 4:21 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    Y_R_E_Wanna_B saidAnyone out there got some pro tips for a weak newbie to help overcome these obstacles?
    Yes. Stop seeing yourself as weak. icon_wink.gif


    Truth. If you keep track, whether written on a chart or something or just mentally, then you start seeing your gains and improvements. Then you'll be motivated to keep going and push further. It takes time, but when you keep track it's all worth it. I just keep track in terms of weights on certain lifts and stuff mentally, and then also I'm taking some pictures like once a month to track gains in my appearance.
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    Jun 04, 2011 4:56 AM GMT
    Wow. Thank you all so much for all the positive feedback. It actually helps quite a bit.
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    Jun 04, 2011 6:16 AM GMT
    Definitely consistency and even diet plays a HUGE part for me. =x
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    Jun 04, 2011 7:54 AM GMT
    Just my personal opinion I don't think P90X is a good workout for a beginner at least it wasn't very helpful for me.

    I say your best bet is to join a gym, one your're comfortable working out in. Get a routine down one that focuses on what you're trying to tone/build so when ur at the gym you know what you gotta do and ur not wasting time.

    To address your two problems:
    1) Consistency - you have to realize to get where you want to be its gonna take continuous work, not an overnight miracle. Get a good pre-workout drink so when you start your workout your pumped and have the energy to actually work out.

    2) Seeing results is what gets me in a positive mindset to keep going. After each workout im looking forward to the next. keep in mind what you're working towards the greatest motivation.

    After a month of working out and seeing how much you've changed your confidence will increase and you'll be walking around the gym like you run that shit.
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    Jun 04, 2011 10:50 AM GMT
    I think a lot of people struggle with maintaining a positive mindset because we can't help but compare ourselves to others. It helps me to remember that most people who look really good have been working at it for a really long time and really hard. I'll get there, but in the meantime I still know I have a lot other skills that those guys probably don't have -- so I keep my self-image pretty good.

    The biggest thing for me was just getting into the routine. I think there has only been one week since November I haven't been in the gym for at least 6 hours a week.

    It also helps that my gym is 24 hours and realllllly nice. I don't use a vast majority of the amenities but its nice to have them.

    I think the true secret to looking great or feeling better about yourself is consistency. Killing yourself in the gym everyday and then getting burned out after the first few months is just a recipe to be highly inconsistent about going. Lets face it, most of us don't have the ability to voluntarily do something we dislike!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 04, 2011 2:46 PM GMT
    adam228 saidI think there has only been one week since November I haven't been in the gym for at least 6 hours a week.


    WTF... 6 hours a day? What aer you training for? 6 hours is counter productive for all activities apart from long distance racing