Dune. Science Fiction's Supreme Masterpiece

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    Jun 10, 2011 7:19 PM GMT
    Has anyone read it? What are your thoughts? I recall seeing the mini series with William Hurt, I love William Hurt. It was pretty good so I picked it up and could not get past the first ten pages. Is it worth it? I know this is all subjective, I am interested in reading RJers thoughts about it.

    Has anyone read The Forever War? I will rave about it all day. That is a classic! Also Forever Peace.


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    Jun 10, 2011 8:16 PM GMT
    I enjoyed the book immensely. Great fantasy/sic fi. The subsequent books were more theologically themed and therefore quite boring. I've read it a few times, but not in many years.
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    Jun 10, 2011 8:19 PM GMT
    Has anyone NOT read it? At least the first three volumes?
    I don't know that I'd go so far as to call it a "supreme masterpiece," because I kind of get the feeling that a real masterpiece would fit into one volume. Dune went on for, what, eight? ten? I forget. Not counting posthumous volumes edited or written by others.

    I couldn't get enough of it, when it was first published (as a serial in "Analog" magazine: we had to wait a whole month for the next chapter!) ((Oddly, enough, that's also where "the forever war" first appeared.)) But really, it used a lot of standard plot formulas. Perhaps it was one of the first do do so with an explicit ecological twist.

    All of the attempts at making movies out of "Dune" have been complete crap.

    If you enjoy the Dune books, you should check out the very slim but hilarious Harvard Lampoon parody, "DOON." But if you haven't read the originals, it probably wouldn't make any sense.
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    Jun 10, 2011 10:17 PM GMT
    on first attempt it did NOT resonate at all. and i have never gone back or past the first few pages. maybe i need some convincing
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    Jun 10, 2011 10:50 PM GMT
    push through it! You'll become hooked, I promise! The books are very political and detailed, but it only adds to the depth of the Dune world.
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    Jun 10, 2011 11:37 PM GMT
    I think Dune is really a classic. The way it lays out the cultural, religious, political and geographical detail is one of a kind. It may have a steep learning curve at the start, but it all pays back when the plot starts to unravel.
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    Jun 11, 2011 12:33 AM GMT
    I've read all of Frank's Dune books through at least 3-4 times each, some more than that icon_redface.gif
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    Jun 11, 2011 1:48 AM GMT
    BlackLabSD saidHas anyone read it? What are your thoughts? I recall seeing the mini series with William Hurt, I love William Hurt. It was pretty good so I picked it up and could not get past the first ten pages. Is it worth it? I know this is all subjective, I am interested in reading RJers thoughts about it.

    Has anyone read The Forever War? I will rave about it all day. That is a classic! Also Forever Peace.


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    first book was ok, but the more of the series i read the more i came to dislike it.
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    Jun 13, 2011 1:45 AM GMT
    Cool thanks for the info guys icon_smile.gif Maybe Ill give it another go.
  • kew1

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    Jun 14, 2011 1:33 PM GMT
    Read & liked the books. Laughed at & hated the film.
    & yes, I've got The Forever War (& Mindbridge, not heard of Forever Peace).
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    Jun 14, 2011 2:15 PM GMT
    You need to make it thru the first 1/3 of Dune before you decide if you're going to continue or not.

    Some things take more investment up front than others. A stephen king novel, or other "top ten" list novel in an airport bookstore, yes, you can tell in 10 pages, but if you treat all books like that, you'll miss out on a lot of authors who are setting the bar higher. Rushdie is one that I find people judge way too early.

    One of the most amazing novels ever, IMHO, "One Hundred Years of Solitude", doesnt really come together until the final few pages. But when it does, your whole brain explodes in a way that will leave you awestruck.

    Sometimes you have to take a risk on some things (and people) that don't seem easy or familiar at first. Those thing may turn out to be much more rewarding than the things (or people) that seem easy to understand right off the bat.

    Of course, sometimes they don't icon_smile.gif But you'll never really know if you judge something complex a bit too quickly.
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    Jun 14, 2011 10:56 PM GMT
    zounds. I was in the stacks this afternoon and thought of this thread... I've got 13 volumes of Dune, and I don't think I have all of them, either. Wow, it would take a whole summer to plow through all of that again. Note that the first paperback is nothing more than a pile of unbound pages at this point.IMG_0264.jpg

    (Oops, south facing window behind there.)
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    Jun 14, 2011 11:01 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidzounds. I was in the stacks this afternoon and thought of this thread... I've got 13 volumes of Dune, and I don't think I have all of them, either. Wow, it would take a whole summer to plow through all of that again. Note that the first paperback is nothing more than a pile of unbound pages at this point.IMG_0264.jpg

    (Oops, south facing window behind there.)


    I actually liked the first original Dune movie. Was the movie based off William Hurt novels? I would be interested in reading the volumes, How many are there and what is the name of the first to start off with? icon_biggrin.gif
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2603

    Jun 26, 2011 3:22 AM GMT
    I`ve read both.'Dune' is the greater,an intensely realized world of its own,but hard going with all the deep themes in it,political,religous,ecological,business.I think it`s great because it lingers in the memory from thirty yeras ago.The David Lynch movie was a failure because he took a bit of everything and blended it to nothing.But it had some memorable imagery in it:Arrakis and Caladan,the Desert,the sandworms,the Shield Wall,etc.
    'The Forever War' is a lighter book,shorter(!) using the image of relativity to express the universality of war.Private Mandella is a notable character,however.
    I think anyone who wishes to 'get 'science fiction needs to read 'Dune' especially.
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    Jun 26, 2011 3:29 AM GMT
    floridajockguy said
    mindgarden saidzounds. I was in the stacks this afternoon and thought of this thread... I've got 13 volumes of Dune, and I don't think I have all of them, either. Wow, it would take a whole summer to plow through all of that again. Note that the first paperback is nothing more than a pile of unbound pages at this point.IMG_0264.jpg

    (Oops, south facing window behind there.)


    I actually liked the first original Dune movie. Was the movie based off William Hurt novels? I would be interested in reading the volumes, How many are there and what is the name of the first to start off with? icon_biggrin.gif



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