DO YOU LIKE TO BE CALLED "MR."??

  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jun 11, 2011 3:56 PM GMT
    So I'm at the Vet this morning. Zach had to have his monthly Addison's shot and the tech who gave him his shot is cute, name is Chris as well.
    So I go up to pay and he refers to me as "Mr......". I had to say, my last name is very german, unusual and he almost got it right. I just said, just call me Chris.

    Refering to somebody by "Mr." or "Mrs." or "Ms." was pretty common
    in the past. I can tell you, I almost always refer to my clients by their first names. I think the "formals" of the past can be a little cumbersome these days. When I get referenced as "Mr"., I think of my Dad. Sometimes it doesn't bother me at all, like when I'm on the phone working an issue for a client.

    So how do you react when somebody calls you "Mr".? Now I kiddingly refer to friends of mine online occasionally as Mister..... I even call "DCEric" here on RJ as "Mister Eric".. but do you like it?

    Its better than "Ms"... LOL
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    Jun 11, 2011 3:56 PM GMT
    I tell them to call me "Sir."
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Jun 11, 2011 3:57 PM GMT
    nahhhhhhhhh.............i like my first name to be used. my last name is also of German derivation. here in new orleans few peeps get it right...always try to add a french spin on it.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jun 11, 2011 4:01 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidI tell them to call me "Sir."


    I'd soooooooo have a comeback for that one...

    icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jun 11, 2011 4:01 PM GMT
    I don't mind being called Mr. It's a level of respect and is very professional of the tech.
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    Jun 11, 2011 4:02 PM GMT
    yes, i expect to be called Mr. ___ unless we have a personal relationship.

    In French we have the word "tutoyer" (which means to call someone by the familar "tu" (you) instead of the formal "vous" (you) It is considred impolite to tutoyer someone unless they address you that way first.


  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Jun 11, 2011 4:02 PM GMT
    strangely enough, "MR" is my first and last names initials.


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    Jun 11, 2011 4:04 PM GMT
    I don't mind it; I see it as a sign of respect. I don't feel old. I grew up calling everyone even my age and younger "Sir" and "Ma'am" or "Madam"
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14372

    Jun 11, 2011 4:18 PM GMT
    I have no problem being addressed as Mr. That is a sign of respect.
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    Jun 11, 2011 4:39 PM GMT
    I hate being called Mr.

    I am Dr. Spaghettimonster, thank you very much!

    I hate titles generally and try to never use them, except for vague corporate formalities like "Mrs. Moneybags" when "To Whom It May Concern" is inappropriate.
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    Jun 11, 2011 4:39 PM GMT
    It doesn't bother me at all .
    The tech at your vet , was very professional and i command him for that .
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    Jun 11, 2011 5:06 PM GMT

    I prefer being called Mr. in some settings...
    If I am addressing someone in a professional setting, I always call the person Mr. or Ms. until given permission to use their first name.
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    Jun 11, 2011 5:26 PM GMT
    I think the only time Mr. would feel weird would be in a casual situation. Though if someone calls me Mr. David, all I'll be able to think about is Consuela from Family Guy.
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    Jun 11, 2011 5:39 PM GMT
    Coming from a southern family, when I was growing up, I was never allowed to refer to an adult by his/her first name. It was always "Mr.", "Mrs.", or "Miss."

    I even remember as a boy, I would sometimes receive letters addressed to "Master Paul....", as was proper for young boys.

    I guess when I hear someone use the "formals" it make me feel a bit nostalgic and I also get a sense that the person using those terms actually has manners and respect for others, especially in today's world when it appears that the majority of the younger generation has no sense of respect or manners.

    To this day, my mother refers to my father's parents as "Mr. A...." and "Mrs. A....". My dad would do the same with her parents if he was still alive. I've never heard either of my parents refer to their mother-in-law or father-in-law by first name.
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    Jun 11, 2011 5:44 PM GMT
    I don't like "Mr."--I'd like to be called "Dr." all the time. icon_twisted.gif

    Actually, I address all my patients as "Mr." or "Miss" (rarely use Mrs since I can't be sure), even if I know them well.

    One patient (who's younger than me) insists on calling me by my first name, and my staff makes fun of it every time he comes. I just ignore it.
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    Jun 11, 2011 5:44 PM GMT
    I think the use of mr., mrs., miss., mam, and sir are very acceptable and polite and should be used when speaking to someone older than oneself, in professional settings, or until you are told to call someone something else.
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    Jun 11, 2011 5:49 PM GMT
    Haha, I don't like being called "mister" or "sir". Even though I'm almost 26 now, I can't help but feel that I'm still too young to be addressed by either term. I just don't feel like a sir or a mister.
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    Jun 11, 2011 6:00 PM GMT
    I don't see a problem with it. In fact, I think calling someone Mr., Mrs., or Ms. _______ is preferable to making the presumption of being informal. It's better to show respect first, and if the other party would like to use first names then go to first names rather than show disrespect.
    I know I was taught as a kid to call adults by their titles as respect.

    Now, the first time I was called "sir" it bothered me a bit. The store clerk was being respectful, but I felt old.
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    Jun 11, 2011 6:01 PM GMT
    When I was in high school my math teacher used to call all of her students Mr. and Miss. last-name as a mutual gesture of respect. I really liked it then. Now that I'm a teacher, it's just part of what I'm used to hearing.

    I also sometimes say just "mister" as a term of endearment to friends.
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    Jun 11, 2011 6:05 PM GMT
    I couldn't imagine a complex situation like in Japan or Korea where you constantly have to be aware of who's of higher social status than you by age, profession, and class and speak to them in the right tone of language. I mean, not only do you have to address them with the appropriate title, but you also have to use different verbs and grammatical endings that correspond to their social status. It's so ingrained into their culture.
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    Jun 11, 2011 6:07 PM GMT
    no
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    Jun 11, 2011 6:08 PM GMT
    I have been giving presentations at high schools throughout this past school school year to kids about future careers in my field. Several of these schools where back around where I grew up and I knew many of the kids still. I am only 26. It was weird getting referred to as Mr. last name by many of the kids who didn't know me. I didn't mind though because it was respectful and I was glad to see that kids are still being raised with some manners.

    On the other hand, if I get called Mr. by someone closer to my age or older it definitely feels weird.

    At work, I call our lab assistant, who is my parents age, Ms. last name and she calls me Mr. last name and I don't mind though because that is our nicknames or I guess how we like to call each other.....its "our thing". We have fun with it.
  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    Jun 11, 2011 6:16 PM GMT
    hearing Sir produces bone in my southern states...just sayin.....BUD
  • shutoman

    Posts: 505

    Jun 11, 2011 6:31 PM GMT
    I often call my friends, 'Mr'; close friends get the honorary title, 'Dr' or 'Doc'
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Jun 11, 2011 6:47 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI like my last name so if people reference me by it, I enjoy hearing Mr. "C****."

    And no that wasn't a "C" for the word cunt. icon_twisted.gif


    Your last name is "Cocksucker"? icon_wink.gif