Should religion be promoted in tax supported schools?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 15, 2008 3:57 AM GMT
    Check this out!

    http://www.startribune.com/16404541.html



  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 15, 2008 10:16 AM GMT
    No
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 15, 2008 3:16 PM GMT
    No!
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Apr 15, 2008 3:28 PM GMT

    promoted, no...discussed, sure.

    This is going to be up to Minnesota voters [in this instance]...education is a state right to monitor and maintain...

    Frankly, I'm surprised this is funded through public dollars...unless there is some sort of federal assistance with tuition [like most universities]...this seems like a private venture...

    ...and if there are public funds being used, the principal can not deny you access to the facility...so long as you consider the proper protocol for visitors...

    - David
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    Apr 15, 2008 3:34 PM GMT
    Religion is a valid subject for education. All religions should be taught though not just Christianity. And it should be an elective not a prerequisite. I am a strong believer in education so the more courses the better. Now if we could only reinstate art, music and phys. ed. everywhere we would really be cooking.
  • joggerva

    Posts: 731

    Apr 15, 2008 3:35 PM GMT
    Promoted? No. Taught the historic importance of? Yes.

    But I saw nothing specific in the article that said that the school was promoting Islam - just that the school is very accommodating to Muslims (much like not having school on Easter and Christmas is accommodating to religious folks) who make up the entire student body. And the headquarters is located in the same facility as the local Muslim community center.

    I think the author did a great job of confusing readers by sticking to acronyms rather than saying "the school" and "the muslim society center".
  • joggerva

    Posts: 731

    Apr 15, 2008 3:38 PM GMT
    Her follow-up article includes secondhand evidence of forced participation in religious practices, so now I'd say she may have a case:

    http://www.startribune.com/local/17406054.html
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    Apr 15, 2008 3:51 PM GMT
    The real problem is charter schools. Administrators and teachers are not bound by qualification requirements that public schools are. The schools have only minimal oversight from the school board and state administrators. Almost anything could be happening inside a charter school. As long as they don't completely fuck up the state or federal tests too many years in a row there is no apparent need for additional oversight.
  • kasch33

    Posts: 52

    Apr 15, 2008 4:08 PM GMT
    MunchingZombie saidThe real problem is charter schools. Administrators and teachers are not bound by qualification requirements that public schools are. The schools have only minimal oversight from the school board and state administrators. Almost anything could be happening inside a charter school. As long as they don't completely fuck up the state or federal tests too many years in a row there is no apparent need for additional oversight.


    I think that is oversimplifying charter schools somewhat. I live in a very rural area, and there are 2 or 3 charter schools that have become very popular and very successful in getting kids into a curriculum that allows them to get to college. They're doing so well in fact that the local Catholic High School had to close it's doors to due to lack of enrollment. It can be argued that because there is less oversight from the state and lack of tenure these schools aren't stuck with crappy ineffective teachers for twenty years. And though they have to teach to the tests, the other electives offered help to round out the students and help them perform in all areas (test scores in our area have actually risen).
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    Apr 15, 2008 4:20 PM GMT
    Charter schools can do a world of good for students. But statistically (and I wish I could site them, but it has been a year since I read them) charter schools do not out perform public schools in the long run.

    The public school system is broken and some competition in the system can be a good thing. Charter schools don't seem to be doing the trick as they are both away from things like oversight but are also still part of the larger broken system. For example, in New York state a school only receives 25% of allocated funds for special education services. So 25% is used to actually help a student and the other 75% feeds the bureaucratic machine. And that is true for both public schools and charter schools.

    I am glad your local charter schools are doing well. I wish they were doing well all over. Anything to keep urban and rural schools from failing as miserably as they are.
  • joeindallas

    Posts: 484

    Apr 15, 2008 9:00 PM GMT
    Speak of all religons and how they interact or do nto interact is critical in this day and age. Promoting one faith or value system over another NO. If you as a Parent believe that firmly in your faith then there are Faith based schools you can send your Children too. I have not read the article that has prompted this discussion, but I have a felling it is a Fundementalism group that is pushing this, Irony would be if it is passed and a Wiccan or other "pagan" belief system tried to get money, the Christian Groups would be the first to protest
  • jarhead5536

    Posts: 1348

    Apr 15, 2008 9:09 PM GMT
    No.


    That was easy. And I'm a pretty religious person...
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    Apr 15, 2008 9:21 PM GMT
    What gets to me though, is that the only reason this was deemed newsworthy was that they were teaching Islam. If it was Christianity, it'd be ignored easily, even if it was a state-funded school.

    Bah. That article wasn't about secularism. It was xenophobia.

    Bah.

    Still NO.
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    Apr 15, 2008 9:41 PM GMT
    No!
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Apr 15, 2008 9:55 PM GMT
    Absolutely not...
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    Apr 16, 2008 11:54 AM GMT
    religion should never be promoted in a public school, discussed in a historical and diversity type of setting yes but not promoted.

    http://www.queersunited.blogspot.com
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    Apr 16, 2008 12:30 PM GMT
    Religion at home and at church.

    School should be reading, writing, science, math, history (real history, not white male Euro history) and more. Religion in the context of certain subjects is fine of course. But actual faith indoctrination...yeah, not so much.
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    Apr 16, 2008 7:11 PM GMT
    Absolutely NO !!!! I was educated in private schools where "BIBLE" class was taught every day. most of us have went the opposite direction of religeon !!! ha !!! At the very most there could be taught a "HISTORY OF WORLD RELIGIONS" but even that could end up with the teacher trying to sway the students to christianity. Its best left to the homes and churches, and left out of public education.
  • Muunrakur

    Posts: 169

    Apr 16, 2008 7:15 PM GMT
    I'm actually planning to send my kids to private, Jesuit, schools if we can afford it. That said, I don't believe religion should be taught in schools, and I'm opposed to "voucher" programs that simply divert tax money to private, often religious, schools.
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    Apr 16, 2008 7:32 PM GMT
    promoted? ithought there was something called "seperation of church and state"? Though i know they make loop holes... icon_evil.gif
  • irishkcguy

    Posts: 780

    Apr 16, 2008 7:37 PM GMT
    It is impossible to study history or culture without a discussion of religion. That said, schools should not be about indoctrinating any one religious belief on anybody.
  • jarhead5536

    Posts: 1348

    Apr 16, 2008 7:51 PM GMT
    irishkcguy saidIt is impossible to study history or culture without a discussion of religion. That said, schools should not be about indoctrinating any one religious belief on anybody.


    True dat. The study of Western civilization is inherently the study of the rise of Christianity in the world. The trick is how to get public schools to teach comparative theology without letting the instructor's bias interfere. They manage to do this in higher education, but public schools seem to get stuck on it whenever they try...
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    Apr 18, 2008 2:42 AM GMT
    My first year at a public college, was the first time any teacher I had ever had, connected our Constitution with biblical principles, in Government Class. I was amazed then that with 12 years behind me of private "CHURCH SCHOOL" education, that this subject had never come up until attending public college. The professor promoted no particular religion, he even compared similarities between democratic principles in the Koran and the Bible.
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    Apr 18, 2008 10:47 AM GMT
    Wysiwyg60 saidReligion is a valid subject for education. All religions should be taught though not just Christianity. And it should be an elective not a prerequisite. I am a strong believer in education so the more courses the better. Now if we could only reinstate art, music and phys. ed. everywhere we would really be cooking.


    EXACTLY!
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    Apr 18, 2008 11:24 AM GMT
    Religion's role in history should be taught, but not promoted in a personal way with tax payer money. Faith (not religion)was once encouraged by public schools as a component of self control and dicipline.