Correlation between your career and your current job.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 14, 2011 3:49 AM GMT
    Hey guys, just wondering, have you applied your career in your place of employment?

    Many people get a bachelors degree but they don't even get to apply what they studied for four years in their current job due to the unavailability of finding one in their current field while others decide to drop their career and jump onto a new job where they can learn on a daily basis what is needed for it to be performed.

    Having said so, in which category do you fall into?
    I'm getting started with college so I'm just wondering of whether is a good choice to find your area of interest or what actually makes the profit for a medium-high standard of living.

    Thanks!

    Btw, I didn't find a category for this topic so I guessed this one would fit better. Sorry for any inconvinience.
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    Jun 14, 2011 4:53 AM GMT
    I think you mean whether people have applied their degrees/educations to their work. For me, the answer's a qualified yes. I currently run my own compan(ies) that are at various stages though I've been doing one for the better part of a decade now.

    I have a business degree with a focus in finance. I think degrees are only a starting point for employers. I've begun to really notice (especially in the hiring process) that there's a substantive difference between those who have degrees and those who don't in terms of how they approach problems - so I think at a minimum no matter the degree, you do generally come away with a structured way to think about problems.

    That said, I'm not sure if it's self selection (ie are the people who get degrees structured thinkers or does the education confer a more structured approach to thinking?). But that's the other thing that I think employers look for. They aren't looking so much for your knowledge but the fact that people who have degrees are a "signal" that you can think, you were actually able to get a degree. It's just another way to weed through candidates - and generally to date it's been a pretty efficient way to do so.

    If you're looking for what degrees are most lucrative/can add most value to society - have a look here:
    http://online.wsj.com/public/resources/documents/info-Degrees_that_Pay_you_Back-sort.html

    Basically, skip the liberal arts unless it's economics, and definitely skip things like gender studies - but above all, do something you love - it'll translate into being far more valuable either as an employee or employer.
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    Jun 14, 2011 4:55 AM GMT
    I have a degree in photography. I realized early that it was too hard to make money at it. I took the skills I learned as far as color/composition, etc and paired it with a flair for writing and began a career in marketing. Which I really love. (most days)
  • tallguy86

    Posts: 39

    Jun 14, 2011 4:56 AM GMT
    Interesting topic.

    I went to school for 6 years and ended up getting 2 degrees, Engineering and Computer Science. In university I went in not knowing for sure what I wanted and kept my options open and closed doors as I realized my lack of interest, my lack of desire for that lifestyle, or lack of job market. I actually changed my major 4 times in the first 2 years of being there.

    Now a degree in engineering for 80-90% of the people tends to mean a job in the engineering field so I may not be the best judge, however computer science I have already been able to to tie it into my career.

    I think the best advice for anyone starting university (and I actually used to work for my university helping first years adjust) is to just go in with an open mind. At your age you probably have no idea what you want with your life and what is most important to you but that is what university will help you do.

    Just remember that money isn't everything (although it is needed) and that there are many other aspects to careers such as benefits, hours, effects on family life, and opportunity for growth (whether it be further education, promotions, etc.).

    University is there to help you figure out who you are on top of educate you for so enjoy the ride. icon_smile.gif

    TL;DR Don't be afraid to change your mind throughout and ask a lot of questions to people working in your respective field to determine if it is a career for you.
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    Jun 14, 2011 5:03 AM GMT
    tallguy86 saidTL;DR Don't be afraid to change your mind throughout and ask a lot of questions to people working in your respective field to determine if it is a career for you.


    ^ this!
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    Jun 14, 2011 5:07 AM GMT
    This is why I work while going to school. I like having the experience to support my education. Though, sometimes it creates distance because my classmates don't' have the same level of exposure to psychiatry/medicine as I do.

    I also really like my job because I get to do so much and learn constantly icon_smile.gif
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    Jun 14, 2011 5:15 AM GMT
    I majored in computer science and work as a software engineering consultant. I'm also a technical recruiter, and have input into our hiring process. My biggest advice to college students: Find an internship/co-op related to your major. When it comes time for graduation and you're looking for a full-time career, you'll be light years ahead of your competitors with work experience. I can pretty much guarantee your resume will be on the top of the list if you have relavant work experience. Also, chances are higher you might be given a job offer at the place you interned at. Don't neglect it. Talk with your schools career department. Most school have some sort of program to help you out on this.

    Good luck!!
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    Jun 14, 2011 5:21 AM GMT
    Mid to high level of income and employment? Medical and med tech fields? There's an aging populations and likely steady employment. If I could do over I'd work up a fluvial geomorphology degree. Healing sick rivers. I have so much fun on river/riparian resto. projects.

    I got a BS in Forest Ecology w/dual majors in fisheries and wildlife biology. Masters in Forest Ecology. Had no taste for a Ph.D. and had a job already w/US Fish & Wildlife Service so pretty happy although pretty tired of the climbers and bureaucracy/politics so kinda ready to just go fishing but that's 7 years off (30 yrs at 56yr old) and maybe hanging in to 62 icon_sad.gif I hope to god not 67 icon_sad.gif Power of dual incomes is awesome when you are partnered up an sucks when you're single.

    Basically go w/your passion and make your self invaluable and employment will come. Or I am full of shit and do hear that regularly.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 14, 2011 5:30 AM GMT
    Well no, my career has been mostly teaching English and music and Im a med student... so they have little to do with each other..

    Then again, after med school, I'll wanna teach at University, so I guess it DOES have to do with it somehow
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    Jun 14, 2011 5:32 AM GMT
    Kev1962 saidMid to high level of income and employment? Medical and med tech fields? There's an aging populations and likely steady employment. If I could do over I'd work up a fluvial geomorphology degree. Healing sick rivers. I have so much fun on river/riparian resto. projects.

    I got a BS in Forest Ecology w/dual majors in fisheries and wildlife biology. Masters in Forest Ecology. Had no taste for a Ph.D. and had a job already w/US Fish & Wildlife Service so pretty happy although pretty tired of the climbers and bureaucracy/politics so kinda ready to just go fishing but that's 7 years off (30 yrs at 56yr old) and maybe hanging in to 62 icon_sad.gif I hope to god not 67 icon_sad.gif Power of dual incomes is awesome when you are partnered up an sucks when you're single.

    Basically go w/your passion and make your self invaluable and employment will come. Or I am full of shit and do hear that regularly.


    O yeah, I was very close to going into that after Bachelors... still hope to do something related someday, even if its with my pHd and research (im thinking like environmental ecology, food and public health)
  • rioriz

    Posts: 1056

    Jun 14, 2011 5:34 AM GMT
    All the way...Degree in Master of Mental Health Counseling and Criminology and am a practicing therapist and hope to open a Private practice soon
  • Latenight30

    Posts: 1525

    Jun 14, 2011 11:36 AM GMT
    absolutely. I have a degree in Theatre Design and Technology and I work as a project manager for systems installation for theatrical lighting.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 14, 2011 3:40 PM GMT
    Thanks riddler78 for the link! Really helpful.

    Also, I have researched about those internships, they seem to be pretty good so far. I'm still on that stage of deciding what career to go for.

    Thanks for your examples and advises !