Surgery in Mexico?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 21, 2011 5:59 PM GMT
    Hey guys, I need some help!
    My mom has MS (multiple sclerosis), and she's just signed a contract to have balloon angioplasy done which should reverse the possibility of CCVI (Chronic Cerebrospinal venous insufficiency).
    Basically, this treatment is supposed to "cure" her MS.

    Since the procedure is new, it hasn't been approved for use here in Canada yet. This means that we have to go to another country to have it done. Currently, we have plane tickets to fly to San Diego, from there, we'll be picked up by staff from Hospital Angelise (sp?), who will drive us to Tijuana, Mexico, where she'll have the surgery.

    As far as we can tell, everything seems legit, but I was wondering if having a procedure done in Mexico is really the right decision!!

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    Jun 21, 2011 6:36 PM GMT
    SO.....I am not a doctor, hopefully one will comment. But my mother was on the board of a hospital in NYC and frequently complained about the fact that there are so many innovative treatments and procedures sprouting up in other parts of the world. She felt like in some respects the American medical community was behind. My aunt who is a surgeon feels the same way so I guess there must be some validity to it.

    I think in order for someone to really help you out, we would need more info, like a link to a website or something. One really good way to ferret out whether or no the procedure works is to go on youtube and look at peoples video testimonials there.......it's the best way to catch first hand accounts of the good the bad and the ugly. Best of luck to you and you mommy. icon_smile.gif
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    Jun 21, 2011 6:39 PM GMT
    I live in Tijuana ( I think you're referring to Hospital Angeles). Lots of Americans come to get procedures done here. I can understand the apprehension, but it's a good hospital (as far as I'd know being a non-doctor anyway).
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    Jun 21, 2011 6:40 PM GMT
    pursuits24 saidHey guys, I need some help!
    My mom has MS (multiple sclerosis), and she's just signed a contract to have balloon angioplasy done which should reverse the possibility of CCVI (Chronic Cerebrospinal venous insufficiency).
    Basically, this treatment is supposed to "cure" her MS.

    Since the procedure is new, it hasn't been approved for use here in Canada yet. This means that we have to go to another country to have it done. Currently, we have plane tickets to fly to San Diego, from there, we'll be picked up by staff from Hospital Angelise (sp?), who will drive us to Tijuana, Mexico, where she'll have the surgery.

    As far as we can tell, everything seems legit, but I was wondering if having a procedure done in Mexico is really the right decision!!



    You need to really do your homework on the place where she's having the surgery. If I were you, I would find out about all the possible side effects of the surgery first. Also you said that it wasn't approved in Canada because it's new, well I would wanna find out why it was approved in Mexico so quickly.

    Having surgeries in other countries no matter where it is always presents a risk because you don't know what their standards are and how they operate, but I wish her luck!!!

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    Jun 21, 2011 6:42 PM GMT
    The thing is....it's not about the country, its about the hospital. Mexico is a country that has a very wide class divide, so there will be a lot of shitty hospitals for the poor people, but then there will be fantastic hospitals for the overclass and I assume your mom is going to one of these.
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    Jun 21, 2011 6:45 PM GMT
    So-called medical tourism (or "medical vacations") is a huge, growing business. It's just another indicator of how unaffordable health care has become in this country. It also illustrates that, contrary to assumptions, American health care is not necessarily the world's best.
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    Jun 27, 2011 10:21 PM GMT
    Mexico's health care is not properly regulated to ensure safety from fradulent/bogus health claims. My own great grandmother went to a"first class" hospital in Mexico because they were they only clinic who offered her a cure for stage four breast cancer. She went there and died two weeks later after a series of ineffective and expensive treatments. I'm not saying this is going to happen to your mother, but I very much recommend that she have it done in the US. If the US and Canada both forbid the procedure, chances are that it is an illegitimate one.
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    Jul 01, 2011 2:19 AM GMT
    i work in a neuro clinic that specializes in ALS, MS, PSP and other motor neuron illness.

    i've never heard of this procedure, and there is currently no cure for MS. I work on clinical trials to develop new treatments to slow progression, but thats the best you can do.

    what you are describing sounds like a scam.
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    Jul 01, 2011 2:28 AM GMT
    its sad but just by wiki'ing Chronic Cerebrospinal venous insufficiency I immediately realized why I never heard of this procedure before.

    even if the procedure does cure her CCVI, its still not a proven cause of MS. and the procedure itself has HUGE risks.

    I would encourage you to check out clinicaltrials.gov to see if any MS research is taking place closer to you in Canada.
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    Jul 01, 2011 2:31 AM GMT
    dekiruman saidThe thing is....it's not about the country, its about the hospital. Mexico is a country that has a very wide class divide, so there will be a lot of shitty hospitals for the poor people, but then there will be fantastic hospitals for the overclass and I assume your mom is going to one of these.


    ^This right here.. check out the hospital, check out where the doctors studied, check out how patients feel about the place when tehy leave, check out how many patients they attract... medical tourism is VERY common, my mom used to go to Miami for her eyes, but is now switching to go to India as well for that

    I see alot of apprehension up here simply about the fact that its not legalised in the US or Canada.... though those concerns are valid, and need to be checked out, I would like to just add that it is indeed true that alot of red tape will significantly slow the process in northern countries and that that may be the reason it hasnt been approved yet.. Like they say, make sure you do ALL the necessary research first
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    Jul 01, 2011 2:38 AM GMT
    That sounds like bullshit. MS is an autoimmune disease that causes the destruction of myeline sheaths on neurons that transmit impulses to move your muscles, causing your body to attack itself.

    Bloodflow won't change that.
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    Aug 06, 2011 3:09 AM GMT
    Well, I would not call this procedure a cure for MS. Its suspected to be a contributing factor to MS, but that isn't very well documented yet. That is why the procedure is not performed in the U.S/Canada. We are strongly weighted towards evidenced based medicine, even if it means a conservative approach to medicine/surgery.

    Definitely do some research on the hospital. If you don't speak Spanish find someone that does to aid in your searches. The surgery itself is relatively safe if performed by somebody that is qualified. The more important aspect is that they will be maintaining sterile procedure.

    The other thing is that this procedure requires long-term follow-up. Make sure you have someone in Canada familiar with the procedure that could if necessary do further intervention and monitor her progress.
  • NursePractiti...

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    Aug 06, 2011 3:17 AM GMT
    I can't speak for that particular hospital in Mexico, but when I and my bf were in Thailand a few years ago he had to go to the hospital for pneumonia. They were very clean, professional and the cost's was next to nothing. The MD's there have to pass American boards and be certified by the AMA here in the U.S. before they can practice. So not all third world countries hospitals are bad. But some are. Definitely do your research before going.
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    Aug 06, 2011 4:49 PM GMT
    KWJohansson saidMexico's health care is not properly regulated to ensure safety from fradulent/bogus health claims. My own great grandmother went to a"first class" hospital in Mexico because they were they only clinic who offered her a cure for stage four breast cancer. She went there and died two weeks later after a series of ineffective and expensive treatments. I'm not saying this is going to happen to your mother, but I very much recommend that she have it done in the US. If the US and Canada both forbid the procedure, chances are that it is an illegitimate one.


    Two points:

    on the general issue of north american vs other healthcare, north america is massively arrogant about its medical system. It is good, but it is not as good as they think and they are very, very far from having veto on what is and isn´t a good treatment. American healthcare is as much about money and law as it is about health.

    On the specific issue in the OP´s post... I´d do as much research as possible, look at european sources if the north american ones are not much use. I certainly would have no hesitation about a top end mexican hospital... likely to be just as good as anything in the USA. As to the specific treatment, no idea....