bent arm

  • wolf

    Posts: 3

    Apr 18, 2008 8:10 AM GMT
    When I was a kid I broke my left elbow, and ever since I haven't been able to fully extend my left arm 180 degrees. The most I can stretch it to is around 160-170 degrees.. This hasn't been a terrible problem when I lift weights because I can be mindful of the angle of my right arm and keep the two balanced. The only problem I'm having is when I do bicep workouts, like hammer curls. After I workout out my biceps, since I can't fully stretch my left arm, the normal lactic acid burning sensation can turn painful. If i keep my left arm bent for a long period of time, post-workout, it will kind of tighten in place and it will hurt to straighten it out again. I'm not sure what my options are in this situation... I try to stretch my arm as much as I can, but it can literally only go so far. I found that sleeping with my arm extended as much as it will go helps, but I'm still worried about damaging my body. Any advice?
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Apr 18, 2008 10:20 AM GMT
    I think any advice other than one from an orthepedic MD is nuts.
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    Apr 18, 2008 12:57 PM GMT
    MikemikeMike saidI think any advice other than one from an orthepedic MD is nuts.


    Ditto!

    Altho you could try the sauna or steam room after a workout to relax your muscles.
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    Apr 18, 2008 6:01 PM GMT
    I most definitely agree with the MD advice. You may want to see an Orthopedist, and a Physiatrist for a non-surgical opinion. Strangely this is one type of physician that many people aren't familar with. In short they are rehabilitation physicians. Rehabilitation physicians are nerve, muscle, and bone experts who treat injuries or illnesses that affect how you move.

    I think this would be a great option for exploring what could be done to address the limited range of motion. They are generally much more versed in the latest non-surgical modalities whereas orthopedists tend to be surgery orientated and not as well versed in rehabilitative options. I can tell you from experience the very best situation is to have both, with a physiatrist managing a health care team that includes an orthopedist, a physical therapist, etc.