Patriotic enough?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 27, 2011 10:31 PM GMT
    So... a local newspaper is running a story about my cross-country walk, and they're doing a photo shoot tomorrow, when I'll be working out at a park with a personal trainer who is teaching me body-weight exercises to do on the road. The photo editor asked me to "wear something representing the USA." Kind of not super ethical to tell me what to wear, but whatever. He suggested a t-shirt with the American flag, but I am not about to wear that. So what do you think? Does this cut it? I've got red, blue, and a pair of legs that are freaking pale these days... hahah...

    a707bc76dddb201edbc0a26fed71caef.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 27, 2011 10:54 PM GMT
    I agree with ditching the American flag on t-shirt idea. I think you have the right idea about the red top, blue shorts, and maybe use white sneakers.
    You could go for the full 9 yards and wear some dog tags or a white plain baseball cap as a manly accessory haha.

    I wouldn't suggest to exquisite a design on your t-shirt. Solid colors seem the way to go. To add some more* sex appeal make it a tanktop with some navy blue shorts.

    4g2op1.jpg

    Have fun!

    EDITS: Me being Canadian, don't let that invalidate my opinion icon_biggrin.gif
    and (*)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 27, 2011 10:58 PM GMT
    19c79 saidSo what do you think? Does this cut it? I've got red, blue......

    100-perfect.gif
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    Jun 27, 2011 11:10 PM GMT
    A photo shoot with a shirt on?!?!? icon_eek.gif
    *scratches head*
    no comprendo
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    Jun 27, 2011 11:18 PM GMT
    Evan87 saidYou could go for the full 9 yards and wear some dog tags or a white plain baseball cap as a manly accessory haha
    hahah... I think the dog tags in that context would have the opposite effect, and make me look très gay. (Not that there's anything wrong with that.) icon_biggrin.gif
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jun 28, 2011 12:45 AM GMT
    I think its just fine.

    I personally think that your walk is probably the most patriotic thing that I have ever seen!
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jun 28, 2011 12:49 AM GMT
    It looks awesome to me, but that is an important point about your skin.
    I hope you will have lots of appropriate lotions to take the proper care
    during your walk.
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    Jun 28, 2011 12:52 AM GMT
    I think it is a respectful attire for the subject .
  • FriscoJansen

    Posts: 2552

    Jun 28, 2011 1:13 AM GMT
    Hmm, you may wanna lose the bulge perhaps??? No wait, do you have to lose the bulge???
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    Jun 28, 2011 1:20 AM GMT
    Looks great!
  • TheIStrat

    Posts: 777

    Jun 28, 2011 1:21 AM GMT
    (Puts his legs in the air)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 28, 2011 2:11 AM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidI hope you will have lots of appropriate lotions to take the proper care during your walk.
    I'll bring sunscreen. Lots of it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 28, 2011 2:15 AM GMT
    Not unethical. I assume the newspaper is a private enterprise. They have the right to print whatever they want, according to their expectations and guidelines. You are fee to wear what you want.

    They are under no obligation to photograph you or run a photo of you. You are under no obligation to be photographed by them.

    Call NPR to take your pic - they hate the US flag, so I'm sure they wouldn't place such an unreasonable constraint on you.
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    Jun 28, 2011 2:46 AM GMT
    JackNWNJ saidNot unethical. I assume the newspaper is a private enterprise. They have the right to print whatever they want, according to their expectations and guidelines. You are fee to wear what you want.

    They are under no obligation to photograph you or run a photo of you. You are under no obligation to be photographed by them.

    Call NPR to take your pic - they hate the US flag, so I'm sure they wouldn't place such an unreasonable constraint on you.

    Whoa... Hold it, cowboy.

    I do not hate the flag. The raison d'être of this whole walk is to explore the question of what it means to be an American. So wearing the colors makes sense. However, the U.S. Flag Code states that the flag should never be used as wearing apparel. So not only are flag t-shirts usually pretty darn tacky, they go against proper usage of the flag. (See: http://www.usflag.org/uscode36.html#176)

    I said it wasn't "super ethical" to tell me what to wear because a photo editor shouldn't tell a subject what to wear any more than a reporter should tell a subject what to say. It's not a terrible breach of professionalism, but also not exactly the best practice.
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jun 28, 2011 3:13 AM GMT
    theantijock said
    JackNWNJ saidNot unethical. I assume the newspaper is a private enterprise. They have the right to print whatever they want, according to their expectations and guidelines. You are fee to wear what you want.

    They are under no obligation to photograph you or run a photo of you. You are under no obligation to be photographed by them.

    Call NPR to take your pic - they hate the US flag, so I'm sure they wouldn't place such an unreasonable constraint on you.


    Being a private enterprise does not relinguish obligation to the good ethics of a profession. That a doctor runs a private clinic does not free him to abdicate the Hippocratic oath.

    That a photographic journalist is not licensed by the state to practice does not free him from the obligation of at least trying to be objective in reporting. In practice, of course, there are other forces at work. The paper has to sell itself and so it has to be pretty or sensational. Newspapers have inhouse studios where many photographs are posed to produce a good picture. A TV station might film a close up of 10 protesters marching about something they wanted to convey as serious when a long shot might have made the protesters look insignificant or even silly.

    But that those things occur does not distract most in the industry from at least trying to be as objective as their own perception allows them to be, to report the news without making the news.

    As to your accusation that NPR hates the US flag, I'm not sure how well photographs show up on the radio. Though, if I recall correctly, wasn't it pappa Bush who banned photographing American flags draping the caskets of our war dead?

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2011/05/17/136411981/scene-from-benghazi-an-old-glory-with-11-stripes

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2010/12/10/131973496/custer-s-last-flag-bags-2-3-million-at-auction

    NPR American Flag Photograph (Do tell Jack, where is the hate?):
    dover_540.jpg?t=1248646809&s=51
    http://media.npr.org/news/images/2009/feb/11/dover_540.jpg?t=1248646809&s=51

    I think its because of how the liberal media kept a running ticker of the body counts.
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jun 28, 2011 3:15 AM GMT
    19c79 said
    JackNWNJ saidNot unethical. I assume the newspaper is a private enterprise. They have the right to print whatever they want, according to their expectations and guidelines. You are fee to wear what you want.

    They are under no obligation to photograph you or run a photo of you. You are under no obligation to be photographed by them.

    Call NPR to take your pic - they hate the US flag, so I'm sure they wouldn't place such an unreasonable constraint on you.

    Whoa... Hold it, cowboy.

    I do not hate the flag. The raison d'être of this whole walk is to explore the question of what it means to be an American. So wearing the colors makes sense. However, the U.S. Flag Code states that the flag should never be used as wearing apparel. So not only are flag t-shirts usually pretty darn tacky, they go against proper usage of the flag. (See: http://www.usflag.org/uscode36.html#176)

    I said it wasn't "super ethical" to tell me what to wear because a photo editor shouldn't tell a subject what to wear any more than a reporter should tell a subject what to say. It's not a terrible breach of professionalism, but also not exactly the best practice.

    +1

    Youre exactly correct. Now if more Americans knew what you know this would be an entirely different country. For the better.
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jun 28, 2011 3:20 AM GMT
    theantijock saidOP pardon the threadjack but to respond:

    JP85257 saidI think its because of how the liberal media kept a running ticker of the body counts.


    Because it would have been more responsible for the so-called liberal media to just group all our dead in some mass grave of unknown soldiers, to not count individually my friend's dead kid, or to not count as a single person that mother's dead kid? Or that father's dead kid? Stop kidding yourself.

    Not arguing with you on this at all, but its was like a counter on the screen from some outlets. Thats all.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 28, 2011 4:11 AM GMT
    Ugh, dont you just LOVE how almost any thread can be twisted to a liberal vs. conservative debate?

    I think the outfit looks great, and the colors are appropriate enough without being over the top. Wear what you want - America is about appreciating individuality! icon_smile.gif

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    Jun 28, 2011 4:12 AM GMT
    I was gonna say something with red and white stripes, but then I realized that would make you look like an early 20th century clown at best and a sort of Big Boy at worst icon_lol.gif
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    Jun 28, 2011 4:26 AM GMT
    theantijock said<
    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2011/05/17/136411981/scene-from-benghazi-an-old-glory-with-11-stripes

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2010/12/10/131973496/custer-s-last-flag-bags-2-3-million-at-auction

    NPR American Flag Photograph (Do tell Jack, where is the hate?):
    dover_540.jpg?t=1248646809&s=51
    http://media.npr.org/news/images/2009/feb/11/dover_540.jpg?t=1248646809&s=51


    A national flag over a coffin? Thats seems wrong to me somehow.... like saying "the country is dead"
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    Jun 28, 2011 4:29 AM GMT
    I think your choice looks fine. I don't think there was any ethical problem at all with the suggestion that you look patriotic. Wasn't a demand, just a suggestion.
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    Jun 28, 2011 4:32 AM GMT
    socalfitness saidI think your choice looks fine. I don't think there was any ethical problem at all with the suggestion that you look patriotic. Wasn't a demand, just a suggestion.


    Even if it were a demand, it would not be unethical. He has the choice to not participate.
  • FredMG

    Posts: 988

    Jun 28, 2011 4:34 AM GMT
    I'd mail you a "Goddess Bless America" bumpersticker but I don't have the time ;)

    How about speedos with the union jack? or maybe a big red Maple Leaf or Star right on the crotch? I mean he didn't specify which country to be patriotic to eh?

    And just for the record, being a 20 year navy veteran, I fart patriotisim, so don't you right wing civilians go get your panties in a bunch.
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    Jun 28, 2011 5:39 AM GMT
    19c79 saidI do not hate the flag. The raison d'être of this whole walk is to explore the question of what it means to be an American. So wearing the colors makes sense. However, the U.S. Flag Code states that the flag should never be used as wearing apparel. So not only are flag t-shirts usually pretty darn tacky, they go against proper usage of the flag. (See: http://www.usflag.org/uscode36.html#176)

    I said it wasn't "super ethical" to tell me what to wear because a photo editor shouldn't tell a subject what to wear any more than a reporter should tell a subject what to say. It's not a terrible breach of professionalism, but also not exactly the best practice.


    100% Agree.

    Although I might suggest a white hat with a good bill/brim to keep the sun from scorching that handsome face of yours - that may complete the all-American look quite nicely. ;)
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    Jun 28, 2011 5:52 AM GMT
    theantijock saidCould this get more convoluted?

    JackNWNJ said
    socalfitness saidI think your choice looks fine. I don't think there was any ethical problem at all with the suggestion that you look patriotic. Wasn't a demand, just a suggestion.


    Even if it were a demand, it would not be unethical. He has the choice to not participate.


    If I've read this thread correctly, there was no original issue whatsoever with whether or not dressing patriotic is ethical or not until the OP misread Jack's comment on the OP's comment about ethics.

    It looks like the OP--failing to separate Jack's erroneous statement on NPR with Jack's hypercritical statement on the freedom of private enterprise regardless of its ethical obligations to professional standards--became defensive and felt he had to make clear that he does "not hate the flag".

    But the OP, a journalist. correctly identified the appropriate ethical dilemma by stating:

    19c79 saidI said it wasn't "super ethical" to tell me what to wear because a photo editor shouldn't tell a subject what to wear any more than a reporter should tell a subject what to say. It's not a terrible breach of professionalism, but also not exactly the best practice.


    I also work in journalism (PR at present). Believe me, there is no "ethical dilemma." It is no different than asking someone to wear yellow for a shot. They may have wanted a particular theme in their layout (or whatever).

    This does not rise to the level of a consideration "of ethical obligations to professional standards."