The U.S. Passed Mandatory Health Insurance In 1798 Under President And Founding Father, John Adams

  • metta

    Posts: 39165

    Jul 04, 2011 8:25 PM GMT
    The U.S. Passed Mandatory Health Insurance In 1798 Under President And Founding Father, John Adams

    http://www.addictinginfo.org/2011/07/03/the-u-s-passed-mandatory-health-insurance-in-1798-under-founding-father-john-adams/
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Jul 04, 2011 8:51 PM GMT
    One thing you need to know about the right wing in America?
    Is that you can never confuse them with the facts
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    Jul 04, 2011 9:29 PM GMT
    That's old news (I think I started a thread on it before).
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    Jul 04, 2011 10:06 PM GMT
    To quote the original blog again:

    http://blogs.forbes.com/rickungar/2011/01/17/congress-passes-socialized-medicine-and-mandates-health-insurance-in-1798/
    This government provided healthcare service was to be paid for by a mandatory tax on the maritime sailors (a little more than 1% of a sailor’s wages), the same to be withheld from a sailor’s pay and turned over to the government by the ship’s owner. The payment of this tax for health care was not optional. If a sailor wanted to work, he had to pay up.

    This is pretty much how it works today in the European nations that conduct socialized medical programs for its citizens – although 1% of wages doesn’t quite cut it any longer.

    http://voices.washingtonpost.com/plum-line/2011/01/founding_fathers_favored_gover.html
    Is this true? In some ways it is, according to Adam Rothman, an associated professor of history at Georgetown University. He argues that it's a "bit of a leap" to compare the 1798 act directly to the individual mandate, because the act taxed sailors to pay for their health care, rather than "requiring that sailors purchase it."

    But Rothman says that it's perfectly legit to see shades of today's debate in that early initiative.

    "It's a good example that the post-revolutionary generation clearly thought that the national government had a role in subsidizing health care," Rothman says. "That in itself is pretty remarkable and a strong refutation of the basic principles that some Tea Party types offer."

    "You could argue that it's precedent for government run health care," Rothman continues. "This defies a lot of stereotypes about limited government in the early republic."

    Also: Some have argued that the individual mandate is, in effect a tax, but one that cuts out the Federal government as middleman. In this reading, everyone will eventually participate in the health system anyway, and the mandate means the Federal government is merely directing people to buy insurance, rather than collecting a tax and using that money to purchase that same insurance for them.

    We will never know whether the founding generation would have agreed with this concept or not. They didn't agree on much even among themselves. But in Rothman's view, they are already on record supporting government run health care, financed by mandatory taxation. So there!