Welcome to Phoenix!

  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jul 06, 2011 6:18 AM GMT
    This is what we had today. Literally the worst we get in weather, but it caused lots of problems. It was a 1 mile high and 50 miles wide. It swallowed the entire metro area in under an hour.

    Big Dust Storm Rolls Through Valley: MyFoxPHOENIX.com



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    Jul 06, 2011 6:20 AM GMT
    That's why I am not there!

    ALOHA!
  • brendanmuscle...

    Posts: 593

    Jul 06, 2011 6:22 AM GMT
    i heard Phoenix got big thunderstorsm today. how does that relate to a dust storm? im confused
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jul 06, 2011 6:24 AM GMT
    brendanmuscles saidi heard Phoenix got big thunderstorsm today. how does that relate to a dust storm? im confused

    When we get dust, its usually in front of a thunder storm. Wall of dirt then raining mud.
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    Jul 06, 2011 6:54 AM GMT
    Great videos and it was rather dusty! BUT, cooled off nicely afterwards!

    Hopefully we will have a good monsoon season this year. The past few years have been kind of quiet-
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jul 06, 2011 8:41 AM GMT
    I went out for a little bit and came home around 1030 and it was still dusty even after a down pour. Ive never seen a dust storm like this one. It was the darkest, thickest dust cloud Ive seen in the 11 years Ive lived here.
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    Jul 06, 2011 2:01 PM GMT
    Its called a haboob... not too uncommon actually.
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    Jul 06, 2011 2:02 PM GMT
    This made the news here in LA.... you all okay?
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19119

    Jul 06, 2011 2:20 PM GMT
    That was really freaky. It hit right when I was leaving the gym and it was so thick I couldn't find my truck. When I finally did, it was covered with about an inch thick layer of dust. I've never seen anything like it.
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    Jul 06, 2011 4:09 PM GMT
    As someone pointed out above, this is called a "haboob". All thunderstorms produce downdrafts that spread outward in all directions, with respect to the storm.

    The downdraft is partially caused by evaporative cooling as rain and melting hail falls through the center of the storm. The melting hail and rain cool the air at the center of the storm, which becomes denser and heavier than the air around the storm at the same elevation.

    In some cases, all of the rain and hail evaporate, but in all cases the downdraft is very strong, strikes the ground and spreads outward, with the leading edge called an "outflow boundary" or "gust front."

    Since the Phoenix area is a desert, these gusty winds will loft dust and cause dust storms as the dusty air spreads outward from the parent thunderstorm.

    Many of the dust storms associated with the "Dust Bowl" in the 1930s were caused by haboobs.

    They are not uncommon at all. In fact they are very common in dry areas that are also prone to get thunderstorms.
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    Jul 06, 2011 4:09 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidThat was really freaky. It hit right when I was leaving the gym and it was so thick I couldn't find my truck. When I finally did, it was covered with about an inch thick layer of dust. I've never seen anything like it.


    Hope the finish didn't get sandblasted....
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    Jul 06, 2011 5:55 PM GMT
    wow that looks crazy! i spent 18 years of my life in phoenix and have never seen anything like that. my friend was driving into town from cali and it took her an extra 2 hours to get home.
  • Spiritreaver

    Posts: 2086

    Jul 06, 2011 6:16 PM GMT
    Am I crazy for thinking this looks amazing? I think It's the crazy Oklahoman in me, definitely didn't get any of that fun in Flag/Prescott yesterday.

    I'm bringing the storm when I'm coming down this weekend. *toot toot*
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    Jul 06, 2011 6:22 PM GMT
    Spiritreaver saidAm I crazy for thinking this looks amazing? I think It's the crazy Oklahoman in me, definitely didn't get any of that fun in Flag/Prescott yesterday.

    I'm bringing the storm when I'm coming down this weekend. *toot toot*


    hahaha look at you icon_razz.gif you are always bringing the storm with your big thunder nuts icon_razz.gif lol and a chance of storms with a semen shower icon_razz.gif hehehe oh you icon_wink.gif
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jul 06, 2011 7:16 PM GMT
    I want to thank everyone for the scientific pointers.

    I know what a "haboob" is. Everyone in Arizona knows what a "haboob" is and we definitely know we live in the desert. Most of us live here for a reason.

    I also know what the Dust bowl is.

    This was the worst Haboob we have had in years.
  • shawn06

    Posts: 337

    Jul 06, 2011 7:25 PM GMT
    I thought it was a pretty cool storm to watch, it just kinda went over and darkened the sky for 45 minutes or so (maybe a lot longer?). I've seen this before but not nearly as long as this one
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    Jul 06, 2011 7:29 PM GMT
    fastprof saidAs someone pointed out above, this is called a "haboob".
    ...
    They are not uncommon at all. In fact they are very common in dry areas that are also prone to get thunderstorms.


    Thank you for the meteorological detail on how these bad babies propagate.

    True they are not uncommon. However this one was uncommonly massive. Having been in the PHX area since '77 it shocked even a longtimer like me.

    Question: Is there a rating system for these events along the lines of how hurricanes and twisters are categorized?

    A clever commenter on a major news website I saw joked that haboobs are rated on a scale from A to DD. And added that yesterday's was indeed a DD.

    Ha!



  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jul 06, 2011 7:33 PM GMT
    Elemental said
    fastprof saidAs someone pointed out above, this is called a "haboob".
    ...
    They are not uncommon at all. In fact they are very common in dry areas that are also prone to get thunderstorms.


    Thank you for the meteorological detail on how these bad babies propagate.

    True they are not uncommon. However this one was uncommonly massive. Having been in the PHX area since '77 it shocked even a longtimer like me.

    Question: Is there a rating system for these events along the lines of how hurricanes and twisters are categorized?

    A clever commenter on a major news website I saw joked that haboobs are rated on a scale from A to DD. And added that yesterday's was indeed a DD.

    Ha!





    I rated it as a good, strong, Scottsdale FFF.
  • Vaughn

    Posts: 1880

    Jul 06, 2011 7:50 PM GMT
    We've been getting a lot of Flash rain down here but no Sand Storm. Yikes!
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    Jul 06, 2011 7:55 PM GMT
    Elemental said
    Question: Is there a rating system for these events along the lines of how hurricanes and twisters are categorized?

    A clever commenter on a major news website I saw joked that haboobs are rated on a scale from A to DD. And added that yesterday's was indeed a DD.



    There's no rating system. However, if the downdraft exceeds around 60 mph, it is liable to produce outflow winds that exceed severe thunderstorm strength (~57 mph) and a severe thunderstorm warning is issued. That was not the case for the Phoenix area....the outflow was nearly spent by that time.

    However, around Gila Bend, the thunderstorm complex was really strong and produced severe thunderstorm strength winds, hence the amount of dust that was carried in all directions...and a Severe Thunderstorm Warning was issued.

    Meanwhile, the thunderstorms congealed into a complex meteoroloigsts call a Mesoscale Convective System and is currently in the Mojave Desert of California. It actually has things in common with a small hurricane, down to the warmer core (center).
    IR4.GIF
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jul 06, 2011 8:34 PM GMT
    According to the weather forecasters the cloud started as a result of storms that tracked up towards Phoenix from Tucson. PInal County is flat, dry and vey susceptible to wind. My mother live in that county and it sucks....
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    Jul 06, 2011 9:39 PM GMT
    fastprof saidThere's no rating system. However, if the downdraft exceeds around 60 mph, it is liable to produce outflow winds that exceed severe thunderstorm strength (~57 mph) and a severe thunderstorm warning is issued...


    Thanks Prof!
    You are simultaneously informative & sweet.
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    Jul 06, 2011 10:06 PM GMT
    and to think I am excited about moving to phx lol
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jul 06, 2011 10:33 PM GMT
    Im still dusting shit off. Holy CRAP.
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    Jul 06, 2011 10:59 PM GMT
    Elemental said
    You are simultaneously informative & sweet.


    ...and a weather geek!! icon_biggrin.gif