It's Time to End the War on Salt

  • metta

    Posts: 39130

    Jul 11, 2011 4:14 AM GMT
    It's Time to End the War on Salt


    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=its-time-to-end-the-war-on-salt


    Do we have any nutrition experts here that can evaluate these findings? Curious!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 11, 2011 11:17 AM GMT
    Caveat: I'm no dietitian here. icon_lol.gif
    http://ndt.oxfordjournals.org/content/16/3/452.full
    A little technical, but the point in this article (which bears out in clinical practice) is that there are salt resistant populations and salt sensitive populations. The important thing is to find out how big the latter is and if it warrants population-wide interventions like the IOM is suggesting here:
    http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2010/Strategies-to-Reduce-Sodium-Intake-in-the-United-States.aspx
    Or if it's even feasible to modify salt intake on a population basis to the extent that IOM is suggesting:
    http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/content/4/11/1878.fullThe likelihood that these diverse sources of data, encompassing multiple population surveys from over 30 distinct cultural settings, in randomized as well as double-blind crossover trials, have defined the same range of sodium intake in adult humans purely by chance is exceedingly small. Instead, they provide compelling evidence, especially when viewed in the context of the recent advances in the neurosciences identifying CNS circuits that respond to peripheral inputs and control sodium appetite, that human salt intake is set within a physiologic range. As such, it is unlikely to be malleable by public policy initiatives, no matter how well intended.

    The current IOM committee convened to consider strategies for lowering sodium intake should first consider whether such strategies can ever alter, or should attempt to alter, what appears to be a physiologically set normal range in adult humans. The current Dietary Guidelines Committee should thoughtfully consider the same question. That question is particularly appropriate as the current Dietary Guideline, set in 2005, of 2300 mg or 100 mmol/d is substantially below the lower limit of 117 mmol/d that this extensive body of data indicates is normal. The importance of addressing this question is fundamental to assuring the feasibility of national nutrition recommendations. If sodium intake or that of any other nutrient is physiologically determined, then our national nutrition policy must reflect that reality in its guidance. To do otherwise will expend valuable national and personal resources against unachievable goals.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 11, 2011 11:28 AM GMT
    Lacking solid scientific evidence, the only thing I have to go on is experience.
    My recent experience playing with salt intake is that eating less salt makes me lose about 5 lbs of water weight in a day, which is great for acquiring a leaner look for photo shoots...pretty much all it's good for really. Other than that, eating abnormally low amounts of salt just makes me feel tired more often, as though my body is missing something. In terms of blood pressure, I feel nothing different; and I can usually feel when my blood pressure is out of whack...low or high.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 11, 2011 11:33 AM GMT
    Note that the IOM isn't asking for people to cut their salt intake abruptly--it's asking food manufacturers to gradually lower salt content so that people won't notice it. There's a big difference between a 3g and a 2g sodium diet, taste-wise.

    I disagree with their goal salt intake though.

    And their recommendations are for the general population; you still have to listen to your doctors if you have kidney or heart disease.