Rower's Body Type?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 11, 2011 7:27 AM GMT
    Hi guys,

    A friend of mine has been rowing for a long time and competes at a state level. She's constantly nagging me to go along to her clubs 'Learn 2 Row' programs each month, but I'm worried I don't have the body type for it. I could captain the ectomorph team to back-to-back victories and have barely left the 68-72kg (150-160lbs) range in the last 2-3 years. I've been doing weights for a couple of months, which have lifted me from 70kg to 72kg, but even when I eat every hour I struggle to put on any more.

    Some internet research only offers the word 'endurance' in giant bold font. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Am I suited to rowing? I'm guessing I'd be more suited to the longer races, but any advice is appreciated. icon_smile.gif
  • Ryvick1212

    Posts: 29

    Jul 11, 2011 1:00 PM GMT
    As a rower of 4 years, I can tell you that virtually any body type can be suitable for rowing. You may be considered a "lightweight" rower, but you totally can still row. I've seen guys the same build as you win races at state level competition. So I would say go for it.
  • fitdude62

    Posts: 294

    Jul 11, 2011 1:07 PM GMT
    The body has an amazing capability to adapt to any situation. You might like the changes that rowing will make to your body.

    Peace
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 11, 2011 2:57 PM GMT
    There really isn't a certain body type that is needed for rowing, although it is helpful if you are in shape and tall.

    I think your best bet is to go to the Learn 2 Row program and see if you enjoy it. If you end up liking it, your coach (or who ever runs the program) will help you train and may even give you some tips on gaining weight/muscle depending on if you're put into a light weight boat or not.

    Although learning to row may be frustrating in the beginning, once you get the hang of it, there's nothing like being out on the water.

    Depending on how well you do on the water and on the erg (indoor rowing machine) your coach will know exactly where to put you in a boat.

    So, basically go for it, and if you like it you'll fit right in icon_smile.gif and if you don't think it's for you, you may find that being a coxswain is more fun. (the coxswain steers the boat and is sometimes considered the coach while out on the water.)

    And, if you do go for it, good luck on your 2k tests ;)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 11, 2011 3:00 PM GMT
    i rowed in college and we had all sizes of guys on our team.

    best case scenario: if the team is big enough they can make a 4-man boat or something out of more "lightweight" rowers.
    if not, depending on what your strengths are, they can place you in the best seat for you. your weight is fine and isn't going to hinder you or the boat any as long as you have the endurance to stay in a race and don't throw the balance off. both of those come with practice and getting to know your stroke and how a boat works.
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    Jul 11, 2011 3:53 PM GMT
    I just started rowing in February of this year. I definitely have to agree with one of the other guys, there is nothing like being out on the water. Rowers come in all different sizes. I love rowing and plan on getting in shape for the fall season.
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    Jul 12, 2011 12:03 PM GMT
    I've used a rowing machine (erg, apparently) a few times and really enjoyed the rhythm of it, so hopefully that will be true for the real deal.

    I've since looked more closely at some pictures on the rowing club's website and they certainly have plenty of guys who look to be a similar build to myself.

    Thanks for all the replies and advice. Let's hope all goes well!
  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Jul 12, 2011 12:14 PM GMT
    I've rowed since I was 12....scary...and am a rowing coach.but yeah you are the ideal build. Tall (ergo long levers) and light weight. You could do to build up big legs and back and strong core - all solid functional stuff. I'd have you on my crew and coach you.

    If I as a short arse can row in a squad Im sure you can.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 12, 2011 12:19 PM GMT
    All good info from the other guys. Sounds like you're studying the sport a bit too much. Just sign up.

    Rowing is hands-down the best sport I ever worked on and I started when I was 30 and skinny.

    It was more of a really fun learning experience in the beginning. The last thing to think about right now is if you have the right body type. Just sign up.

    You're lucky if you have a rowing club near you and some nice flat water.

    Just sign up!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2011 10:32 AM GMT
    my rowing team was just there this past weekend. They raced in the chicago sprints.icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2011 10:50 AM GMT
    I coxed and rowed in high school and was recruited to cox for college. Like others said, at 6'5 you're kinda ideal. It doesn't matter if you don't know how to row yet, everyone has to learn at some point and there are a bunch of different classes and styles to rowing.

    Some of my friends from college on my team were 6'5/6'6/6'7 and not necessarily beefy muscular (we just had heavyweights). You almost don't want to be too beefy, since it obviously adds more weight to the shell.

    Good luck, it's an awesome sport. Morning practices were always great seeing the sun rise.
  • SirEllingtonB...

    Posts: 497

    Jul 13, 2011 11:34 AM GMT
    My college team told me I should cox since I'm 5'6" 130 lbs but I refused of it - rowing is fun and totally doable with any body type, really
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2011 12:00 PM GMT
    Elle saidMy college team told me I should cox since I'm 5'6" 130 lbs but I refused of it - rowing is fun and totally doable with any body type, really


    Are you saying you didn't want cox? icon_twisted.gif

    EDIT: Sorry - I know there's a 100 mil+ coxcock jokes and they are all suck. But still!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 14, 2011 1:54 AM GMT
    I was on the rowing team for my first semester only and the work that we went through not only got me into more shape but also motivated me to go workout a lot more ^_^ and i found it to be really fun but couldn't continue cause the busy schedule and lack of sleep was affecting my grades icon_sad.gif
  • TheIStrat

    Posts: 777

    Jul 14, 2011 2:00 AM GMT
    I row and I weigh only 150 lbs. Try it out
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jul 15, 2011 8:15 AM GMT
    It won't change your face, but it will add a V to your backicon_idea.gif
  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Jul 15, 2011 9:20 AM GMT
    At the end of the day,rowing is all about TECHN IQUE technique technique and having good technique....being efficient int the water and getting your blade where it should be at the right time.

    Muscle size comes later and is an added bonus.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 16, 2011 10:13 AM GMT
    Thanks again for all the great info and encouragement you guys are offering! I've booked a spot for the August program and am really looking forward to it. Here's hoping all goes well! icon_biggrin.gif

    MikemikeMike saidIt won't change your face, but it will add a V to your backicon_idea.gif


    I'm happy with that! icon_razz.gif