Finger numbness??

  • jackd15

    Posts: 37

    Jul 14, 2011 4:41 PM GMT
    Sooooo this past weekend I took part in the Ride For Aids Chicago. 100 miles Saturday and 100 on Sunday. Before that the furthest I'd ridden was about 50 in a day. It's now four days later and my pinky and ring finger on both hands are extremely weak/kindof numb. It's freaking me out - thoughts anyone?
  • starboard5

    Posts: 969

    Jul 14, 2011 8:45 PM GMT
    I'm not a doctor, and you should see one. It may be a result of the biking; kind of depends on the type of handle bars and your posture while riding. Numbness in the last two fingers might suggest cervical nerve root irritation. were you bent over the handle bars and extending (craining) your neck? If it doesn't improve noticeably after two or three days of icing it (like 3x a day for 15-20 min.) and ibuprofen every 6-8 hours, definitely go see a doctor. Or if it gets worse before then, go to the doc.
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    Jul 14, 2011 9:15 PM GMT
    I am not a doctor either, but this sounds like a natural consequence of sustained gripping and vibration while riding 200 miles in 2 days. Give it a couple of weeks and, if it has not abated by then, see a doctor. The human body is pretty good at fixing itself. Well done!
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    Jul 14, 2011 11:22 PM GMT
    You likely compressed the ulnar nerve either at the elbow (if you were leaning on them during your ride) or at the base of the palm of your hand as it travels from your wrist into your hand. If it doesn't start improving in a couple of weeks to a month, see your physician.
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    Jul 14, 2011 11:29 PM GMT

    sounds like what people have with tendonitis or carpel tunnel.

    When I was in physio, they would give my forearm heat, then massage the tendons, then ice it to keep swelling down. I am guessing the cause is inflammation which restricts bloodflow and gives you numbness, and that's why the massage and anti-inflammatories helped me. But it was a long time building up for me, so I don't expect your problem to need much healing. Just go easy with your arms for a while.
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Jul 15, 2011 12:01 AM GMT
    I have the same thing from time to time when I ride...I believe Bryanc_74 called it correctly...

    Finger numbness can be a symptom of a wide variety of diseases, disorders, or conditions that either restrict blood flow or cause injury to the nerves. Temporary finger numbness can be due to any activity that causes prolonged pressure on a nerve or nerves, such as fine motor activities (drawing), repetitive motion, and sleeping the wrong way on your arm. Finger numbness can also be due to orthopedic conditions that compress a specific nerve.

    Numbness of the pinky finger and the ring finger together can be a sign of entrapment or compression of the ulnar nerve in the arm, possibly due to problems with the shoulder, elbow, or wrist joint. Index finger numbness, along with abnormal sensations in the thumb and middle finger, is due to problems with the median nerve, which can be caused by carpal tunnel syndrome.

    In some cases, finger numbness is a symptom of a serious or life-threatening condition that should be evaluated as soon as possible in an emergency setting.

    Orthopedic causes of finger numbness
    Finger numbness may occur because of moderate to serious orthopedic conditions that can lead to spinal or peripheral nerve damage including:

    •Broken finger affecting a nerve

    •Carpal tunnel syndrome

    •Cervical spondylosis (degenerative disk disease in the neck)

    •Herniated disk

    •Nerve entrapment or compression, such as of the ulnar nerve in the arm
    •Neck injury


    - David icon_wink.gif
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    Jul 15, 2011 12:10 AM GMT
    ^^^^^^^^^

    I get it quite frequently with long rides, goes away in due time.
  • gwuinsf

    Posts: 525

    Jul 15, 2011 7:17 PM GMT
    bryanc_74 saidYou likely compressed the ulnar nerve either at the elbow (if you were leaning on them during your ride) or at the base of the palm of your hand as it travels from your wrist into your hand. If it doesn't start improving in a couple of weeks to a month, see your physician.


    Follow this advice.

    This is common among cyclists, but getting this degree of numbness after two days is unusual. If you Google for it, you'll find a number of articles that describe the condition and what you can do to combat it.

    The first thing I'd recommend, if you have not done it, is to make sure you have your bike professionally fit. You need to make sure that your saddle is the right height and distance from your handlebars so you're not putting more weight on your hands than you need to be. Anyone doing a great deal of riding MUST get their bike fit for them by a professional that knows what they're doing. Go to a good bike shop and ask for a recommendation.

    For myself I found that I had less pains on the bike (back pain, shoulder strain, hand pain) when I worked on strengthening my core. The stronger your core is the better you can hold yourself on the bike.

    Last there are the usual, common sense recommendations. Wear well padded gloves. You can also put gel pads under your handlebar tape, which I've done. Vary your hand grip often.

    Oh and congratulations on the ride. Back to back centuries is something to be proud of.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 18, 2011 7:51 PM GMT
    bah, a minor warrior's injury .
    you'll live.
    just be easy on them,it'll heal.

    congrats on the ride , a double century is always worthy of praise .

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 19, 2011 12:17 AM GMT
    jackd15 saidSooooo this past weekend I took part in the Ride For Aids Chicago. 100 miles Saturday and 100 on Sunday. Before that the furthest I'd ridden was about 50 in a day. It's now four days later and my pinky and ring finger on both hands are extremely weak/kindof numb. It's freaking me out - thoughts anyone?


    Do you ride with rings on? If i've ridden with a ring on my right ring finger, it and my pinky will be numb for days.

    Also, finger numbness occurs as pressure and time on the hands increases.
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    Jul 23, 2011 2:25 PM GMT
    Triguy013 said
    jackd15 saidSooooo this past weekend I took part in the Ride For Aids Chicago. 100 miles Saturday and 100 on Sunday. Before that the furthest I'd ridden was about 50 in a day. It's now four days later and my pinky and ring finger on both hands are extremely weak/kindof numb. It's freaking me out - thoughts anyone?


    Do you ride with rings on? If i've ridden with a ring on my right ring finger, it and my pinky will be numb for days.

    Also, finger numbness occurs as pressure and time on the hands increases.


    makes you wonder about anyone riding with a cock ring. .. icon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 10, 2011 4:01 AM GMT
    gwuinsf said
    bryanc_74 saidYou likely compressed the ulnar nerve either at the elbow (if you were leaning on them during your ride) or at the base of the palm of your hand as it travels from your wrist into your hand. If it doesn't start improving in a couple of weeks to a month, see your physician.


    Follow this advice.

    This is common among cyclists, but getting this degree of numbness after two days is unusual. If you Google for it, you'll find a number of articles that describe the condition and what you can do to combat it.

    The first thing I'd recommend, if you have not done it, is to make sure you have your bike professionally fit. You need to make sure that your saddle is the right height and distance from your handlebars so you're not putting more weight on your hands than you need to be. Anyone doing a great deal of riding MUST get their bike fit for them by a professional that knows what they're doing. Go to a good bike shop and ask for a recommendation.

    For myself I found that I had less pains on the bike (back pain, shoulder strain, hand pain) when I worked on strengthening my core. The stronger your core is the better you can hold yourself on the bike.

    Last there are the usual, common sense recommendations. Wear well padded gloves. You can also put gel pads under your handlebar tape, which I've done. Vary your hand grip often.

    Oh and congratulations on the ride. Back to back centuries is something to be proud of.


    ^

    All of what he said.

    The only thing I will add is that it is so common, it even has a name; cyclists' palsy. As was said, get your bike fitted properly and, on anything more than say, 40 kilometres, make sure you wear well-padded gloves. This is not the time to cheap out and buy whatever gloves that are on sale - make sure you buy a brand that specializes in cycling gear; mine are from Specialized and they work great.

    And yeah - congrats on the ride!!