How would you handle your depression?

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    Jul 15, 2011 5:26 AM GMT
    If you were diagnosed with depression, your physician wanted to put you on antidepressants and one of the major contributing factors of the condition was your current line of work what would you do?

    A)Take prescription medications to treat the condition and continue working.

    B)Take the prescription meds and quit the job and get better one.

    C)Continue working and try to change your working conditions.

    D)Refuse taking medication and find another job.

    E)Take a leave of absence and return once you felt better wit or without meds.
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    Jul 15, 2011 5:43 AM GMT
    It's not what would I do, it's what I did: C.
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    Jul 15, 2011 5:49 AM GMT
    I'd go with "B," but by all means find another job before quitting this one. Also get a second opinion before assuming the best way to treat your condition is with drugs. Depression meds (and those for ADD/ADHD) are the most overprescribed. I'm not all about "holistic" healing by any means, but alternative treatments like St John's Wort are out there and work for many people. Aromatherapy, homeopathy, and the like have a quackery stigma attached to them which is probably not entirely fair. You might also want to consult a "life coach," who would function more as someone who can clarify what career path would be best but could also serve as a therapist to some extent.

    It also makes a difference to know how your job is affecting your emotional/mental/spiritual state. Are less qualified people capable of your duties? Did you take it because you had bills to pay and weren't finding anything in your chosen field? Are your co-workers and/or managers aggravating? Is there a risk of downsizing? If you can focus on what factor(s) bring on your compromised state of mind you can determine whether or not they can be fixed. And if they can't, start pimping the résumé (are you on LinkedIn?)

    Best o' luck. In this forum I'll only add, "been there, done that." But you can get in touch directly if you like. icon_smile.gif
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    Jul 15, 2011 5:56 AM GMT
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    Jul 15, 2011 5:59 AM GMT
    Chaa_xwvn saidcrazystraw.jpg
    The glass is always full.
    Air is made of microscopic particles. Even in a vacuum there are microscopic particles.
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    Jul 15, 2011 6:06 AM GMT


    Yes, thank you, the glass is always full. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jul 15, 2011 6:08 AM GMT
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    Jul 15, 2011 6:09 AM GMT
    I did E then A but not by choice.

    I mentally thought I was okay. I thought I was handling the stress of the job and my family well but my body hadn't got the memo. Long story short I was taken to the hospital because everyone thought I was having a heart attack( this was a day-time soap in itself). Forced to take some days off felt a little better.

    Get back to work and same stress, same issues, different day. Meds were pretty much forced. ( military position didn't give me much say to my body) Huge mistake. I know med side effects are different person to person but I felt like a zombie. Complete disconnect, lack of emotion, and crazy nightmares. I had to tell mulitple doctors I had vivid dreams of killing people before they took me off. Later found out they gave me the wrong dosage, 4x over what I was prescribed.

    I wish I had a happy ending but it is what it is.
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    Jul 15, 2011 6:15 AM GMT
    F) I got a couple of dogs.
    I don't have the time to be depressed when I have two dogs happy to see me or go for a walk or who just want to curl up with me.
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    Jul 15, 2011 6:21 AM GMT
    Ermine saidF) I got a couple of dogs.
    I don't have the time to be depressed when I have two dogs happy to see me or go for a walk or who just want to curl up with me.


    I second this.

    feelings.jpg
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    Jul 15, 2011 6:21 AM GMT
    Mech82 saidIf you were diagnosed with depression, your physician wanted to put you on antidepressants and one of the major contributing factors of the condition was your current line of work what would you do?

    A)Take prescription medications to treat the condition and continue working.

    B)Take the prescription meds and quit the job and get better one.

    C)Continue working and try to change your working conditions.

    D)Refuse taking medication and find another job.

    E)Take a leave of absence and return once you felt better wit or without meds.


    I've had depression since I was 16. It runs in my family, my mom has it, my brother has it, my cousins have it.

    I never wanted to admit I need medication because I thought it was weak, well finally I put my pride aside and went to the doctor, she put me on meds and it really does help. Obviously some things still suck but you look at life in a different way, you don't have that deep empty feeling like life sucks all the time everywhere haha...

    I chose answer A and see if you like your job, if not find another THEN quit your current job. Do what makes you happy. Whatever it takes.
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    Jul 15, 2011 6:23 AM GMT
    AnotherKevin saidI did E then A but not by choice.

    I mentally thought I was okay. I thought I was handling the stress of the job and my family well but my body hadn't got the memo. Long story short I was taken to the hospital because everyone thought I was having a heart attack( this was a day-time soap in itself). Forced to take some days off felt a little better.

    Get back to work and same stress, same issues, different day. Meds were pretty much forced. ( military position didn't give me much say to my body) Huge mistake. I know med side effects are different person to person but I felt like a zombie. Complete disconnect, lack of emotion, and crazy nightmares. I had to tell mulitple doctors I had vivid dreams of killing people before they took me off. Later found out they gave me the wrong dosage, 4x over what I was prescribed.

    I wish I had a happy ending but it is what it is.


    What medication is this? Brand? I can't imagine normal anti depressants giving you this effect.
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    Jul 15, 2011 6:29 AM GMT
    C... With the addition that I would take the meds.
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    Jul 15, 2011 6:43 AM GMT
    Aaaaaaand last one:

    forested.jpg
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    Jul 15, 2011 8:58 AM GMT
    To answer your question seriously OP, I would pick D, but that's just me. I can't live your life for you. So...yeah. If you pick door number C, try to add some medication and ALSO change the working conditions.

    Don't be like this kitty either:
    00000162.gif

    http://picturesforsadchildren.com/index.php?comicID=162
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jul 15, 2011 9:01 AM GMT
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    +
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    Jul 15, 2011 9:03 AM GMT
    disregard posts; get jacked on jack ^^^^
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    Jul 15, 2011 9:30 AM GMT
    Mech82 saidHow would you handle your depression?...

    Well..... when I feel like this, I don't talk about it much. In fact, it's hard to have a conversation with anybody about anything,lolicon_smile.gif


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    Jul 15, 2011 2:16 PM GMT
    MuslNorganLikrAromatherapy, homeopathy, and the like have a quackery stigma attached to them which is probably not entirely fair. You might also want to consult a "life coach," who would function more as someone who can clarify what career path would be best but could also serve as a therapist to some extent.


    There's a reason Homeopathy has such a negative stigma attached, there's absolutely no scientific proof that Homeopathic substances have any effect apart from the placebo effect any substance can have.

    And also, anyone with no credentials can call themselves a "life coach," which can be incredibly dangerous, especially if they decide to attempt to 'treat' the depression with ill used techniques which can do more harm than good.

    But, Mech82, maybe you should see a shrink about the depression, you said it's one of the major contributing factors. They should be able to help you with coping mechanisms and try to help you overcome it.
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    Jul 15, 2011 3:36 PM GMT
    My first instinct would be D but realistically I would have to pick C. It's hard enough dealing with the personal issues without adding to the problem. I don't think meds would be for me, it would be the last resort. Counseling would be my avenue before anything else.
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    Jul 15, 2011 3:40 PM GMT
    I was in this exact same situation, and let me tell you... the meds aren't worth it. That shit is poison as far as I'm concerned. Read this before you start taking anything:

    http://www.amazon.com/Anatomy-Epidemic-Bullets-Psychiatric-Astonishing/dp/0307452425/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1310743586&sr=8-1

    This one's not bad as a reference too, but the first is a better read:

    http://www.amazon.com/Your-Drug-May-Problem-Revised/dp/0738210986/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1310743625&sr=1-1

    I knew nothing about depression/anxiety when this happened to me, and it was due to my job in my situation as well. I just got too stressed out and broke down and suddenly had no idea what the hell was going on with me.

    The docs prescribed meds, and while I think some of them potentially had a short-term benefit, none of them are worth the long-term risks or side effects. I stopped over a year ago and it was the best choice I could have made.

    My suggestion?

    1) Take the time off of work if you can -- leave of absence, short-term disability, whatever you can qualify for. If that's the trigger for you, getting out of that environment is going to be the most important thing you can do.

    2) See a therapist. Yeah, in some ways this carries the same stigma as going on meds, but personally, I think any type of psychological or cognitive behavioral therapy is going to do a lot more good for you than popping a pill. Avoid the quacks and look for a legitimate, practicing psychologist.

    3) Focus on exercise, diet, and sleep. These three things alone can have a dramatic effect on your mood. Try to exercise daily, even if it's just a 30-minute walk outside. Avoid crappy food (fast food, fatty foods, etc) and take the time to make sure you're putting good stuff in your body. And sleep... this was the hardest for me 'cause sleep is what goes first when you're depressed or anxious... but try to get yourself on a predictable schedule, even on weekends. Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day, give yourself enough time to sleep (for me, 6.5 hours is the magic number... for others it's higher... for others it's lower), and try to avoid distractions that would wake you up (too bright of a room, leaving the TV on, etc).

    4) I don't know what line of work you're in, but I would start thinking about what kind of changes you could make to your existing work (or what other lines of work you could pursue) that would reduce the stress and give you more satisfaction. For me, freelancing ended up doing the trick. It got me out of the brutal 9-5 (well, more like 8 - 7 + weekends) office environment, and allowed me to do the same type of work on my own schedule. I think flexibility is important when you're struggling with something like this.

    Anyway, sorry for the long message, but I've been in this situation myself and I understand how frustrating it can be. Hit me up if you want to chat about any of this, and best of luck whatever you decide to do!
  • patmos9990

    Posts: 146

    Jul 15, 2011 4:01 PM GMT
    I would do D and then use Jack3d has my medication. I swear they "high" I get off of that keeps my depression at bay.
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    Jul 15, 2011 4:24 PM GMT
    I was supposedly depressed when I was seventeen. I am pretty stubborn, so I like to disagree with the diagnosis, but I did see a psychiatrist. I just told myself I have so much to look forward to, and don't need to think about the things that upset me.
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    Jul 15, 2011 5:44 PM GMT
    Mogwais said
    MuslNorganLikrAromatherapy, homeopathy, and the like have a quackery stigma attached to them which is probably not entirely fair. You might also want to consult a "life coach," who would function more as someone who can clarify what career path would be best but could also serve as a therapist to some extent.

    There's a reason Homeopathy has such a negative stigma attached, there's absolutely no scientific proof that Homeopathic substances have any effect apart from the placebo effect any substance can have.
    And also, anyone with no credentials can call themselves a "life coach," which can be incredibly dangerous, especially if they decide to attempt to 'treat' the depression with ill used techniques which can do more harm than good.
    But, Mech82, maybe you should see a shrink about the depression, you said it's one of the major contributing factors. They should be able to help you with coping mechanisms and try to help you overcome it.


    Well said!!
    Also, there are various causes for depression. Many times it is the result of a chemical in-balance in the brain. There are THREE chemicals which are produced in the brain...and many different brands of meds to treat each one.
    There is NO blood test...or any other kind of test...to determine which may be out of balance. It is strictly trial and error. I know this for a fact....it took four different meds to figure out which one worked best for me. The others were not only disastrous, but extremely dangerous. I had feelings of paranoia and suicide with most of the ones I tried early on.
    AND, this all occurred during a period when I was working 10 to 12 hour days, six to seven days a week. When I approached my boss about PTSD and work overload, the fucking bastard FIRED me.
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    Jul 16, 2011 1:21 AM GMT
    One thing doctors always say when treating mental illness is to try one thing at a time. They don't start you one two meds because they won't know what changes were caused by which drug. Same for changing a job at the same time as adding a medication.

    Most doctors also would tell you to try non-medicating methods first, including identifying and changing the circumstances which cause the trouble, and therapy.

    Antidepressants take a month to make any difference, and some will never have a positive effect on you. Pretty much all of them have side effects of different degrees of annoyance though. You may be 4 months before you would find one that works well for you, but do you really want to be depressed for 4 months more? Best try other things first.