Is it part of human nature to never be satisfied?

  • metta

    Posts: 39138

    Apr 23, 2008 6:40 AM GMT
    I think it is one of the reasons why humans have progressed so much.

    I also think that it may be one of the reasons why so many relationships fail.

    What do you think?
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    Apr 23, 2008 8:28 AM GMT
    Of course. icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Laurence

    Posts: 942

    Apr 23, 2008 10:12 AM GMT
    I think there's something in that.

    But believe that people can overcome their need to move on, and learn to work with what they've got.

    Once you stop struggling and imagining there's something better out there, I think it's perfectly possible to be happy and satisfied.

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    Apr 23, 2008 10:25 AM GMT
    For some people that is definitely the case. I find so-called "Type A" personalities often seem plagued by with feelings of not being satisfied and the need to constantly strive and succeed. My best gay friend and my brother are both Type As and they are often frustrated in life. I am more of a go with the flow type of guy, I like to sit back and "smell the roses" so to speak!
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    Apr 23, 2008 11:17 AM GMT
    Even laidback guys are never satisfied. It's part of being human. It's why we have dreams after all. icon_razz.gif

    Type A's however have too much of that drive, hehe.

    Personally it doesn't take that much for me to be reasonably satisfied. But total contentment if it ever happens will only ever be fleeting.

    The only moment we can be truly satisfied is probably with a total mind wipe or death. icon_razz.gif
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    Apr 23, 2008 11:24 AM GMT
    In the Western world, we have that urge to constantly change. But I dont think it is true in all cultures.

    Like in China, until the West showed up on their doorstep, I believe many things, like fashion, stayed the same for hundreds of years.

    Can anyone speak to this more authoritatively?
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    Apr 23, 2008 11:29 AM GMT
    Ah yes, thanks for the invitation, Caslon.

    I am the ultimate authority on myself.
    And, so saying, the answer is both yes and no.

    I am quite satisfied materially.
    I am never satisfied with my personal improvement.

    This may describe a lot of us.
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    Apr 23, 2008 11:59 AM GMT
    Well, I know very few who don't like a new pair of shoes.
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    Apr 23, 2008 1:09 PM GMT
    RunintheCity saidWell, I know very few who don't like a new pair of shoes.


    Moi. icon_cool.gif

    Imelda Marcos I am not, I only buy shoes (even running shoes) when I absolutely have to.
  • swimbikerun

    Posts: 2835

    Apr 23, 2008 3:55 PM GMT
    metta8 saidI think it is one of the reasons why humans have progressed so much.

    I also think that it may be one of the reasons why so many relationships fail.

    What do you think?

    I think "fail" is a term used too often for relationships.
    Sometimes it comes down to a choice of deciding to grow and allowing yourself (and your partner) to change.
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    Apr 23, 2008 5:55 PM GMT
    Uhhh - YEAH!

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    Apr 23, 2008 6:01 PM GMT
    Wysiwyg60 said[quote]

    Moi. icon_cool.gif

    Imelda Marcos I am not, I only buy shoes (even running shoes) when I absolutely have to.


    I didn't say like shopping for shoes.
    I said like a new pair of shoes.
    There's a distinct difference.
    I hate shoe shopping, as I can't often find what I like in my size (14) - but I do like that new shoe feeling.
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    Apr 24, 2008 5:19 AM GMT
    New shoes always makes me feel new all over. icon_biggrin.gif

    But then I realize that they were made in sweatshoips where my countrymen probably slaved all over it to ship it off abroad and ship it back in again at twice the price. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    May 02, 2008 2:59 PM GMT
    It's funny you should say that. According to the scientist and author Desmond Morris (he wrote the "Naked Ape") it's part of being human.

    Morris was the technical advisor for the film "Quest for Fire". In one scene, one of the cavemen is picking up some kind of vegetable that looks like cucumbers and he has a whole arm full of them and he keeps trying to add one more but drops another in the attempt. It's hilarious but very telling about human nature.

  • yogadudeSEATT...

    Posts: 373

    May 02, 2008 3:31 PM GMT
    It's our ego that keeps us wanting that next new shiny thing. As long as the ego can keep us distracted by external wants, the ego keeps itself relevant. It's only when we stop "buying" into the ego's demands that we can look inside, grow quiet, and find true peace of mind.
  • rexinfx

    Posts: 23

    May 02, 2008 4:06 PM GMT
    jprichva saidA

    I am quite satisfied materially.
    I am never satisfied with my personal improvement.

    This may describe a lot of us.


    And I do think it does describe a lot of us. Materially I have most valuables I need, and some extras.

    I personally feel though that if you are satisfied, life may be a little bit more repetitive. I always set personal goals to allow room to grow. I know that if there isn't something for me to reach someday, I might as well throw in the towel.

    reminds me of benny benassi, push me, and then just touch me, til I can get my, satisfaction.
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    May 03, 2008 10:52 PM GMT
    The only moment we can be truly satisfied is probably with a total mind wipe or death.icon_razz.gif

    [sigh]
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    May 03, 2008 11:01 PM GMT
    Wysiwyg60 said[quote][cite]RunintheCity said[/cite]Well, I know very few who don't like a new pair of shoes.


    Moi. icon_cool.gif

    Imelda Marcos I am not, I only buy shoes (even running shoes) when I absolutely have to.[/quote]

    OMG. I have about 30 pairs of shoes. Pulse runners, sandals, thongs (flip flops in US of A). Is this not normal. Was thinking I need something new for my trip to Hawaii.
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    May 03, 2008 11:03 PM GMT
    RunintheCity said[quote][cite]Wysiwyg60 said[/cite][quote]

    Moi. icon_cool.gif

    Imelda Marcos I am not, I only buy shoes (even running shoes) when I absolutely have to.


    I didn't say like shopping for shoes.
    I said like a new pair of shoes.
    There's a distinct difference.
    I hate shoe shopping, as I can't often find what I like in my size (14) - but I do like that new shoe feeling.[/quote]

    Now you what they say about guys wit big feet.... I'd be satisfied with that.
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    May 03, 2008 11:08 PM GMT
    It is human nature to desire to be happy. The dissatisfaction is merely a failure to hit that mark, and a fundamental part of human Heuristic or learning mechanism.

    On the other hand in some thinking
    Tao Te Ching 58Happiness is rooted in misery.
    Misery lurks beneath happiness.
    The problem is actually with the deceptive nature of our desires.
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    May 04, 2008 12:25 AM GMT
    This all reminds me of the musical Pippin, who never seems to be quite satisfied. I would reccommend seeing it. Ben Vareen is amazing as the narrator!