Job interviews and a new location,

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 26, 2008 4:32 PM GMT
    I am looking for a new job and have been actively looking for about 8 months. I want to relocate to a warmer and sunnier location in the southeast or southwest US. I have turned down many offers for a variety of reasons, mostly for "compensation packages" that were really weak.... I have another 2nd interview coming up next week and this one looks VERY positive!

    2 questions…..first: after you have done all of your research and have seen the company EEO/Diversity policies, etc., when you interview, do you feel comfortable asking direct questions that “OUT” you? Have you ever declined an offer because of an “ambiguous” or “incomplete” policy?
    Second: do any of you have any comments on living in Raleigh, NC? What is the gay scene like in Raleigh; is the city “livable” or is it just another conservative, sleepy southern capitol city? How do the folks react to having a new “Yankee” neighbor?
    Strangely enough, I love COLUMBUS, OH! It is a great place to live and to be gay, but the climate is too cloudy and dark, winter lasts about 3 months too long for me and the economy of Ohio is going to shit very quickly. Still, just curious about your views and experiences.

    Thanks.
    Gary
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 26, 2008 7:48 PM GMT
    Have you looked in the northern Virginia area: Fairfax Co., Arlington Co, City of Alexandria. With the federal government here, the area is almost recession proof. Lots of companies so you can move between companies without having to move yourself. Cost of Living is high, so get a good wage.

    Of course, lots of cultural stuff too....and so much for free. The National Gallery of Art is so great. It brings in art from all over the world.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 26, 2008 9:05 PM GMT
    Caslon saidHave you looked in the northern Virginia area: Fairfax Co., Arlington Co, City of Alexandria. With the federal government here, the area is almost recession proof. Lots of companies so you can move between companies without having to move yourself. Cost of Living is high, so get a good wage.

    Of course, lots of cultural stuff too....and so much for free. The National Gallery of Art is so great. It brings in art from all over the world.


    But of course, Virginia is probably THE most gay-hostile of all states legally. The version of the marriage amendment that passed a couple of years back prohibits essentially any legal recourse for gay couples, including contracts that preserve any of the perquisites of marriage.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2008 1:23 AM GMT
    jprichva said[quote][cite]Caslon said[/cite]Have you looked in the northern Virginia area: Fairfax Co., Arlington Co, City of Alexandria. With the federal government here, the area is almost recession proof. Lots of companies so you can move between companies without having to move yourself. Cost of Living is high, so get a good wage.

    Of course, lots of cultural stuff too....and so much for free. The National Gallery of Art is so great. It brings in art from all over the world.


    But of course, Virginia is probably THE most gay-hostile of all states legally. The version of the marriage amendment that passed a couple of years back prohibits essentially any legal recourse for gay couples, including contracts that preserve any of the perquisites of marriage.[/quote]

    You are quite right...I would move to MD or DC, before VA....still, metro DC is very appealing for the cultural, social and professional aspects...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2008 1:35 AM GMT
    I live in Virginia-the west end that is. I've done a lot of reading, and traveling here in the southeast, (I'm originally from Michigan just 90 miles from chicago, your reasons for moving are the same as why I did 25 years ago) Raleigh is a fast growing city, and I think you'll find that the population is quite diverse. There are people from all over the country moving to these southeastern cities. This tendency of increased population diversity has even happened to small 50 to 65 thousand population towns even this far out where I'm at. I think you'll find plenty of diversity so you'll feel at home once settled in. I've never regreted moving here to my area, just north of the East Tenn. TRI CITIES METRO AREA. I hope all goes well for you !!! GOOD LUCK !!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 27, 2008 5:40 AM GMT
    Well, I don't know anything about Virgina or Raleigh, but being gay I've definitely thought about the first question a lot in my previous job searches.

    I personally wouldn't work for a company that didn't value diversity. Period. It should be in thier mission statement, on their career site, and/or in their job postings.

    That being said, the fact that I'm gay is only one part of my identity and IS NOT required to do my job. I don't need to where my gay pride rainbow pin all day to feel validated. I DO need to feel valued and comfortable as an employee and as a human being in the work environment.

    I think the best route while you're interviewing is to be truthful. How truthful is up to you. For example, if a recruiter or hiring manager asks if you are planning to relocate with your family, that is considered a valid question (they want to know if you'll have a support system in a new place).

    Your response can be vague, or you can be more specific.

    Note - straight people use the term Partner and ask about Domestic Partners Benefits, too.

    While interviewing, stick to your experience and qualifications for the job. Keep it professional and to the point.

    Use your own judgment. Do your research about the company before you apply. If you have asked for benefits info and still haven't found what you are looking for then ask. If that outs you, then so be it. See "Note" above...

    If you go that route, pay attention to how you are treated. Consult an attorney with employment law expertise if you have questions or concerns. Fight for your rights.

    Remember, you're in the interview process to learn about the company and the job, just as much as they are there to learn about your professional background, interests and skills as it relates to that job.

    Hope that helps.