Tonight I ran for the first time in years...

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 26, 2011 4:55 AM GMT
    I am most definitely not a jock. I joined RJ because I recently came out and want to start getting into shape, and--especially--to gain weight. Before I get too serious with the weights, however, I thought it would be good to devote the next couple of weeks to some general "get in shape" goals, like (1) being able to do more than three consecutive push-ups, and (2) actually being able to run a mile or two without keeling over.

    Tonight, I ran for the first time in years. Earlier today I drove my car around my neighborhood and, using my odometer, scouted out a 3-mile course. The 3-mile mark was at the recommendation of my friend, who is going to school on an athletic scholarship for track and field.

    The first 4 minutes of my run were great (probably because I spent the first three minutes speed-walking instead of actually running). I was proud of myself and it didn't seem too bad. Then, at around 5:30, I started feeling like death incarnate. Half a mile or so into my 3-mile course, I found myself leaning against a neighbor's wall, struggling to not throw up. I stumbled home and clutched my chest for twenty minutes trying to fight the heartburn. Oh god, it was awful.

    I think part of my problem is that it is very hot and humid where I live in Arizona. But I don't own a treadmill and I'm too cheap for an indoor gym, so I think running outside is my only option. The other obvious point is, I think, not to try to do so much so fast.

    Other than that, what am I doing wrong? Any RJ-ers want to admit to having been as out-of-shape as me, and then improved? And why in the world did I get this horrible heartburn feeling?

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    Jul 26, 2011 4:59 AM GMT
    First of all, welcome to running. icon_smile.gif

    I think one big mistake a lot of people make when they first try running is that they start out too fast... I'd say start out more slowly, even if you think you're going too slow. And by "starting out" I mean starting out running/jogging, I'm not including the "speed walking" bit. icon_razz.gif Also drink tons of water throughout the day.

    But you'll get better at it as time goes on.
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    Jul 26, 2011 5:00 AM GMT
    You should do the morning run thing since heat can be bad unless you're used to it. And don't be too hard on yourself you have to start somewhere it's tough in the beginning sometimes gets easier or tougher depending on what you do. Just keep going and don't stop, I remember how bad it was when I started the whole fitness stuff, but didn't let that stop me and you shouldn't either icon_biggrin.gif
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Jul 26, 2011 11:36 AM GMT
    Well done for getting running again!
    As above, avoid the hot times of the day and go steady to start with,under do it.Try a five minute warm up before you set off,jogging very slowly on the spot,and some stretches to loosen you up.Afterwards,do the same,cooling down and some static stretching to finish.
    Do several runs per week,no more than twenty minutes,and then gradually do more as you feel stronger.Try to always do something active as consistency is the key.
    Drink plenty of water and rest between runs.
    I was pretty out of condition five years ago when I began,but now do half marathons in about ninety minutes-and enjoy myself!
    Good wishes with your running!
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    Jul 26, 2011 11:53 AM GMT
    I agree with comments about expecting too much too soon. Most folks start out too fast. Above all, try to enjoy it—otherwise it won't last very long.

    Here's a good site, a proven plan for people wanting to eventually run a decent 5K without feeling like they've shit the bed:

    http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml

    Good luck and keep posting. We're rooting fer ya!
  • austex85

    Posts: 572

    Jul 26, 2011 11:57 AM GMT
    also, 3 miles is a lot to run for someone who hasn't run in years. even for more experienced runners, 3 miles is still a decent amount for a workout.

    why don't you start out at doing a 1 mile run. see if you can use the local high school's track. each loop should equal around 1/4 mile. so you can start by running one loop, then slowly jogging the next, then go back to running, etc. once you feel good about the 1 mile, then up it .25 mile at a time.
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    Jul 26, 2011 1:01 PM GMT
    austex85 saidalso, 3 miles is a lot to run for someone who hasn't run in years. even for more experienced runners, 3 miles is still a decent amount for a workout.

    why don't you start out at doing a 1 mile run. see if you can use the local high school's track. each loop should equal around 1/4 mile. so you can start by running one loop, then slowly jogging the next, then go back to running, etc. once you feel good about the 1 mile, then up it .25 mile at a time.

    Excellent advice about both the distance and the track. Track can be easier on your joints than the pavement. Also recommend going to a good store specializing in running shoes.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jul 26, 2011 1:12 PM GMT
    Some good advice given above. I was going to concur.... not overdo it and I'd even get some advice from your doctor about his or her thoughts about your
    plans. I personally would have started with a mile and moved forward from there. I certainly would be very aware of how you feel and how your body is reacting. Best wishes, awesome that you are making the effort!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 26, 2011 1:22 PM GMT
    Eat meat. Lift weights.
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    Jul 26, 2011 1:34 PM GMT
    You did good.

    A good rule of thumb for distance running is that if you can't hold a conversation while running/jogging.. you are going too fast.Though, I am prone to shin splints if I go too fast so maybe I am just comfortable with jogging like an old person icon_razz.gif

    Also, if you are prone to heart burn and nausea after running, try not to eat before running.

    The single biggest difference for me was eating. Your body is expending a lot of energy to keep you running... but if you don't have any energy to burn because you're on a 800 calorie diet, its not going to work out.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 27, 2011 3:45 AM GMT
    Congrats!!! You're already doing more than most of the populace.
    Great advice above. Nothing at all wrong with mixing a little, or a lot, of walking in your workout.
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    Jul 27, 2011 3:59 AM GMT
    Congratulations on starting out. It's a good first step. I almost got sick once just from riding a bike because I hadn't done it in so long. I think I just overheated. It happens.

    There's a lot of good advice here. Start slow and work your way up. It can be a test of patience, but if you take your time, you are less likely to be injured or give up.

    I'm a big fan of having real numbers I can see. I like using a heart rate monitor to see how I'm really doing and to make sure I'm not going too fast. You can get an approximation of what heart rate you should be running in from searching around the web. If you want to go that route, you can also get a heart rate monitor with GPS to track your distance and speed. I haven't used one of those yet. I can't comment on how accurate they are.