how to run

  • helios01

    Posts: 349

    Jul 26, 2011 11:30 AM GMT
    omg i thought this was easy but i tried to run in the morning and got tired 3 secondds after i started.... should i stretch?
    i googled it... but nothing useful showed up. i mean wow i am out of shape icon_sad.gif
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jul 26, 2011 1:51 PM GMT
    stretching doesn't stop you from being tired (and actually isn't necessary before as much as it is after a workout). it's probably because you're out of shape.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 26, 2011 3:46 PM GMT
    walk before you run.

    srsly. Do half an hour´s fast walking 3 times a week for a while then start mixing in running.
  • iHavok

    Posts: 1477

    Jul 26, 2011 4:00 PM GMT
    What do you mean by "got tired"?

    Got winded?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 26, 2011 4:05 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidwalk before you run.

    srsly. Do half an hour´s fast walking 3 times a week for a while then start mixing in running.


    This is what I did and started doing again. I am up to running almost 3 miles a day.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 26, 2011 4:05 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidwalk before you run.

    srsly. Do half an hour´s fast walking 3 times a week for a while then start mixing in running.
    ^this
  • iHavok

    Posts: 1477

    Jul 26, 2011 4:09 PM GMT
    It is fairly good advice.

    I went by the walk at a speed that makes talking difficult, but not impossible, means your heart is beating good and steady, but you don't feel exhausted, and after a while (3 months or so), of pushing it to keep up a pace where you are at that pace, you have to begin to job/run to keep it up, and at that point, it's easy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 26, 2011 4:38 PM GMT
    As part of my physical therapy (after a car accident sidelined me for months) they had me go to a local track and run (jog) the straight sections and walk the curves. Really helped build up my stamina gradually. Initially for 30 minutes then increased time

    After that got "comfortable", we went half lap run/quarter walk, repeat...
    Then moved to full lap/walk half lap walk..gradually reducing the walk length I was running a mile without walking, then two until I was back to doing 5Ks

    Worked great for getting both muscles and cardio fitness back without over-doing it. Would work just as well as a starting point as it was for injury recovery
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2603

    Jul 26, 2011 4:38 PM GMT
    Walk first-vigorously-then slow jogging to follow.And build it up from there.
    Stretching can help before and after walking/running,dynamic before,static afterwards.Warm up before and cool down afterwards when you start running.
  • Markguy

    Posts: 36

    Jul 26, 2011 10:53 PM GMT
    I totally agree with the walk before you run advice. I lost 70 lbs a couple of years ago and couldn't run at all to start with. I walked, fast, for several months and then gradually added in running. I've completed a marathon now, so it can be done.

    Another thing to think about is that some people run better in the afternoon than in the morning. I detest morning running - feel like I have no energy. By the time work is over I'm ready to go out and let off some steam. Try exercising at different times and seem how your body reacts.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 16, 2011 5:36 AM GMT
    If you're talking about running technique look up the pose method on youtube. To sum it up, the pose method basically tells you to take shorter strides, to bend your knees, to try to land on your mid-foot, to wear shoes with less cushion, and to kick your legs back instead of extending them far forward. If you're talking about how to gain stamina, start off with incline walking and slowly work your way toward running. Losing weight also helps.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 06, 2011 4:15 AM GMT
    joe122 saidIf you're talking about running technique look up the pose method on youtube. To sum it up, the pose method basically tells you to take shorter strides, to bend your knees, to try to land on your mid-foot, to wear shoes with less cushion, and to kick your legs back instead of extending them far forward. If you're talking about how to gain stamina, start off with incline walking and slowly work your way toward running. Losing weight also helps.


    Always wondered why the serious runners kicked back so high.

    To enable me to run with my knees flexible, I decided to hit the leg machines for quads, hams, etc. Within a week, I had overdeveloped one group and then you can't keep your knee caps stable. My legs would stiffen up.

    Another problem just diagnosed after nearly a decade of leg cramps. I have a significant vitamin-D deficiency. 20 instead of 50.

    Google for leg cramps and vit D. Doctors in California don't check that like they do up in Seattle. No idea why. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Here's an article on something else: colon cancer and vitamin D.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/01/us-vitamind-idUSTRE78063U20110901



    Another article.

    http://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0115/p299.html
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 06, 2011 4:26 AM GMT
    Walk then run yes.

    walk and run yes. nothing says it has to be one or the other.

    run with a friend hasn't been said but i find that a running partner, especially when first starting out, helps to distract from that (OMG I AM GOING TO DIE) feeling that makes you stop and forces you to push yourself (at least I do because I don't want to wimp out in front of them).

    Running is much more mental toughness then physical. If you keep running you will find that you break through these plateaus where it stops hurting and starts to feel easier...till you hit the next one. In general, I think I have read that you need to run for at least 10 minutes for your mind to register the activity you are doing and start sending endorphins and all the other good stuff that helps block pain and for your muscles to warm up and get good blood flow.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 21, 2011 10:31 PM GMT
    Consider joining a local running club. It seems that every town, large or small, has one.

    Most clubs have tips for training, free analysis, guest speakers, free trials of new shoes, etc....

    Most importantly, there is mutual support. Running with others encourages one to up the pace and stick with it.