Lower back pain when running

  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Jul 27, 2011 2:16 PM GMT
    HI

    Ive started getting absolutely terrible lower back pain (just above glutes, Quadratus Lumborum type area). So much so I have to stop running and lay down. Only diffreance to my regime is now running outdoors not on a treadmill due to my gym closing down.

    Any idea what might be causing that???????

    Also: can anyone recommend some good stretches for flexibility of gastroc and soleus as now Ive started Xcountry running instead of treadmill or X-trainer they are killing me.
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    Jul 31, 2011 7:31 PM GMT
    Have you considered going to see a chiropractor? They can really work wonders.

    Lower back pain SUCKS. At its best a nuisance, at its worst completely debilitating. I saw a chiropractor for a while last year and he helped a ton.
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    Jul 31, 2011 7:48 PM GMT
    Hi:

    I had similar situation. I went to a Chiropractor and found out that I need alignment and one of my discs which with his treatment worked. Also, need to increased my abdominal workout...in essence you need to strengthen your core or middle section. Increase abdominal workouts: sit-ups, planks, upper abdominal and lower abdominal workouts...this will help with your back.
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    Jul 31, 2011 8:27 PM GMT
    uombroca saidHi:

    I had similar situation. I went to a Chiropractor and found out that I need alignment and one of my discs which with his treatment worked. Also, need to increased my abdominal workout...in essence you need to strengthen your core or middle section. Increase abdominal workouts: sit-ups, planks, upper abdominal and lower abdominal workouts...this will help with your back.


    This. Also, there are some stretches you should do before you run, I learned this through my lower back/running ordeal.

    1) Lay on your back, feet flat on the floor, knees together and bent up. Keeping your knees together, roll your knees to the right until your right knee is touching the floor or as close to the floor as possible and hold for 3-4 sec. (Keep you back/shoulders flat on the floor).

    Do the same, but to your left now, holding for 4 sec again. Repeat these 2-3 times.

    2) Lay on your back with your legs flat on the floor. Cross your left ankle over your right knee, keeping your right leg flat and straight. Your left ankle should be resting on the right leg just above the knee. Keeping your back flat on the floor, slowly raise the knee of your right leg up so that you are lifting the left foot/ankle leg up towards you (your toes of your left foot should begin to aim at the sky as you raise it.). You should feel a nice stretch in your lower back. Stretch it as far as it feels comfortable without pain. Then lower to the floor and repeat with the other leg.

    3) Repeat Step 1 (important).
  • Lo3iondo

    Posts: 9

    Jul 31, 2011 8:42 PM GMT
    Some generic principles of alignment to keep in mind for any exercise or stretch in relation to lower back pain:

    Feet face straight forward relative to the positioning of your leg. Basically, the center of your ankle in line with the base of the second toe. Knees are right over the top of your ankle. (so when lying on your back, flex your feet so your toes are pointed at the ceiling)

    Medially rotate the adductors, and draw the tailbone/sacrum into the body. The action of the inner thighs drawing inward toward the back of the body will create expansion in the back and a curve in the lumbar spine.

    This, combined with the action of the tailbone (sacrum/bottom tip of the spine) drawing inward, will engage the pelvic floor and create contraction in the lower back and space between the vertebrae of the spine.

    Now go to yoga and do that in every pose. icon_smile.gif
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    Jul 31, 2011 8:54 PM GMT
    I do believe that the biggest cause of lower back pain is tight hamstrings. They share an insertion/origin spot so if one is pulling tightly on the bone the other will be tensed, and therefore cause pain.