Vanity question: (35+10+5) lbs, or (45+5) lbs?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2011 11:45 PM GMT
    So I have progressed to the point where I can finally bench press an Olympic bar with ONE 45 lb plates on each end (i.e. total of 135 lbs). (One year ago I could barely bench press the Olympic bar plus 20 on each side) icon_redface.gif

    I start out with 35, then I add a 10 for the second set. For the third set, I have this great stupid urge to take the 35 and 10 down, and put up a 45 and 5, even though I know that I just need to add a 5 for the third set.

    Vanity of vanities. icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 12:48 AM GMT
    Oh no, I didn't mean compulsive behavior. I just mean that I could show my workout partners that I've "graduated" to the "adult" 45 lb plate. Completely inconsequential in terms of weight but might boost my vanity.icon_lol.gif
  • iGator

    Posts: 150

    Aug 03, 2011 2:00 AM GMT
    I prefer to keep the weight as close to the inside as possible...the farther out the weight is, the heavier it will be (i think, according to physics)...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 2:07 AM GMT
    So the 45 lb plate is actually easier than 35+10lbs...by just a little. But what if you put the lightest plates inside, and the heavier plates last?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 2:39 AM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidI start out with 35, then I add a 10 for the second set. For the third set, I have this great stupid urge to take the 35 and 10 down, and put up a 45 and 5, even though I know that I just need to add a 5 for the third set.

    Vanity of vanities. icon_lol.gif


    LOL I'm down there with ya, dude, and I totally get the psychological difference. icon_smile.gif
  • Latenight30

    Posts: 1525

    Aug 03, 2011 2:53 AM GMT
    don't put the smaller ones to the inside then you will get looks.
    I try never to completely clear something I'm working on. It gives others the impression you are finished.
    Just add weight.
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Aug 03, 2011 3:25 AM GMT
    iGator saidI prefer to keep the weight as close to the inside as possible...the farther out the weight is, the heavier it will be (i think, according to physics)...


    Close. To some extent, all weightlifting exercises are about applying torque against the Earth's gravity. Torque is force multiplied by a radius of rotation, so if the weight remains the same, then increasing the radius also increases the necessary torque.

    However, in this case, there's only a negligible difference in torque between 45+5 and 35+10+5, because a) the force of gravity is the same on both sets of weights, b) the center of gravity only moves a tiny distance from one to the other, and c) the direction the center of gravity moves is orthogonal to the direction of travel, so the radius effectively doesn't change.

    Changing to the 45+5 setup may make the bar a bit more stable for you, though. (And yeah, there is that whole macho vanity thing too.)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 3:26 AM GMT
    umm, i don't think it makes any difference where you put the plates, 225 is still 225 no matter how you load the bar, but i'm certainly no physicist, unless of course u tip it a lot, but by the time you tip it that far i'm afraid your already in trouble, i would tend to go for a lil heavy if you trust ur spotters. thats why there their, if you can get your current weight for 12 reps i'd add a lil weight, maybe a 5 on each side
  • dannyboy1101

    Posts: 977

    Aug 03, 2011 3:27 AM GMT
    iGator saidI prefer to keep the weight as close to the inside as possible...the farther out the weight is, the heavier it will be (i think, according to physics)...


    Huh?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 3:36 AM GMT
    I'm not very good at physics, but I don't think it matters too much.

    If anything it might shift the load balance on your wrists but I think most people would compensate by adjusting the position of their hands/wrists to put the load back on the thence eminence (the pad next to your thumb - the strongest and most stable portion of your hand)

    But then you have to factor in the load on the bar itself at rest (the bar bends) and maybe that provides even distribution considering the weight is the exact regardless of position at rest.

    TL;DR -- It probably doesn't matter but if it makes you feel better, go for it
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 4:08 AM GMT
    It matters, but I'd have to do some calculations to figure out if it matters too much. My guess it doesn't matter much.

    That doesn't add much to the discussion, I realize. But the further out the heavier weight is from the pivot point/center of mass, the more force you'd have to impose to lift.

    The other thing you didn't say is how far down to the chest you are bringing the weight. In terms of the workout your pecs get, the closer to the chest the better. However, that puts tremendous stress on the rotator cuff (shoulder) group.

    Be sure to warm up with just the bar, and lower weight classes before you attempt the heavier weights.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 4:11 AM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidSo I have progressed to the point where I can finally bench press an Olympic bar with two 45 lb plates on each end. (One year ago I could barely bench press the Olympic bar plus 20 on each side) icon_redface.gif

    I start out with 35, then I add a 10 for the second set. For the third set, I have this great stupid urge to take the 35 and 10 down, and put up a 45 and 5, even though I know that I just need to add a 5 for the third set.

    Vanity of vanities. icon_lol.gif



    Hey, if it makes you feel like your achieving goals and gives you personal satisfaction then change those weights out! It's not hurting anyone.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 4:13 AM GMT
    actually for vanity you could switch to 45s but for a harder workout I would add the five and then do drop sets til you are exhausted and can't lift anymore. 3-4 sets heavy remove the 5, do a set or two, remove the 10 do a set or two. Killer workout!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 5:06 AM GMT
    i used to be that way, until i realized that i am working out for MY benefit, and that i couldn't care less about what other people thought of the amount of weight i lift.

    sometimes i'll just bench two 25lb plates, just to "feel" the weight and work on form...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 10:23 AM GMT
    MMTM, I just saw my typing mistake-- I meant 1 45 lb plate on each end, not 2 on each end! (if I can do 225 lbs total I don't think I need to load those little plates). So total of 135-150 lbs. Sorry for the confusion.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 10:26 AM GMT
    JoshTPDX saidactually for vanity you could switch to 45s but for a harder workout I would add the five and then do drop sets til you are exhausted and can't lift anymore. 3-4 sets heavy remove the 5, do a set or two, remove the 10 do a set or two. Killer workout!

    yeah when I can do it I'm going to do 35+25lbs and then drop set to 35lbs, since I don't think I can do the 45+ 10 then 45 drop set yet.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 10:42 AM GMT
    Latenight30 saiddon't put the smaller ones to the inside then you will get looks.
    I try never to completely clear something I'm working on. It gives others the impression you are finished.
    Just add weight.


    I know this looks untidy but can someone tell me why not?

    re the physics question.

    You are raising the weight in line with the bar, the centre of gravity or the fulcrum will always remain at the centre of the bar if the weights are stacked evenly regardless of the amount of plates you use.

    The only difference would be in the diameter of the plate, and actually a greater number of smaller plates would be inherently more stable than a larger plate should you dip one end of the bar down on your last rep.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 10:43 AM GMT
    Also I think it's better to use up the larger plates first to free up the smaller plates for others to use. Depending how well stocked your gym is of course.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 10:48 AM GMT
    Thisuserexists saidAlso I think it's better to use up the larger plates first to free up the smaller plates for others to use. Depending how well stocked your gym is of course.


    I thought about that too. But since everybody likes to use 45 lb weights, the 35, 10 and 5 weights are all free.
    I actually haven't used the 45 lb weights yet because we take turns lifting. One of my lifting partners can only do 35+35, so it's actually easier to just take off the 10 for him. icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 10:52 AM GMT
    fastprof said
    The other thing you didn't say is how far down to the chest you are bringing the weight. In terms of the workout your pecs get, the closer to the chest the better. However, that puts tremendous stress on the rotator cuff (shoulder) group.

    Be sure to warm up with just the bar, and lower weight classes before you attempt the heavier weights.


    Yes, my trainer didn't want me to advance much in the beginning until I could bring the bar quite far down to my chest.
    The 35 + 35 is the warm up set for me.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 6:12 PM GMT
    I work to minimize the number of plates I have to move.
    In your example I'd do the 35+10+5
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 6:34 PM GMT
    I'm right there with you man. I recently "graduated" to the big boy 45lb plate on my bench and I switch out the 35lb plates for 45lb plates for my work sets. I don't do it to show off or anything, but rather for my own ego/motivation.
  • kcbronc

    Posts: 36

    Aug 03, 2011 7:00 PM GMT
    A lot of lifting, as with any sport, is psychological. A sense of accomplishment goes a long way so using a 45 on each side instead of a 35+10 could give you that extra burst you need.


    My theory is...
    Whether the larger plates are on the inside or outside shouldn't make a difference as far as the amount of strength needed to lift the weights. The changes would be negligible and not come in to play unless the weights were really spread out, at which point balance would become an issue and seem more difficult.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 7:02 PM GMT
    I definitely understand. Graduating to finally using the "big" 45 lb plates was a huge deal for me for my bench, squat, and deadlift.

    Now working from 1 45 plate on each end to 2 seems to b taking a lot longer. O well, no one said having a killer bod was easy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 03, 2011 7:04 PM GMT
    Just start with a 45 on each side and add a 5! It's not rocket science!