Nanofiber Regenerates Blood Vessels

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    Aug 03, 2011 3:23 AM GMT
    Pretty cool.

    A synthetic material may help to repair tissue after a heart attack, and aid transplants.

    Regenerating blood vessels is important for combating the aftereffects of a heart attack or peripheral arterial disease, and for ensuring that transplanted organs receive a sufficient supply of blood. Now researchers at Northwestern University have created a nanomaterial that could help the body to grow new blood vessels.

    Samuel Stupp and his colleagues developed a liquid that, when injected into patients, forms a matrix of loosely tangled nanofibers. Each of these fibers is covered in microscopic protuberances that mimic vascular endothelial growth factor, or VEGF—a protein that occurs naturally in the body and causes chemical reactions that result in the growth of new blood vessels. By mimicking VEGF, the nanofiber has the same biological effect.

    Jeff Karp, director of the Laboratory for Advanced Biomaterials and Stem-Cell-Based Therapeutics at Brigham & Women's Hospital, says, "this is an elegant approach to rationally design engineered materials to stimulate specific biological pathways." Karp was not involved with the project.

    Ali Khademhosseini, an associate professor at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, adds that "the ability to induce blood vessel formation is one of the major problems in tissue engineering."
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    Aug 03, 2011 4:39 AM GMT
    I've been watching quite a few documentaries and lectures about nanotechnology. It's really interesting to see where it can lead and what kind of stuff it can do.