Moving To NYC

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    Aug 06, 2011 1:35 AM GMT
    Hi,

    I just got laid off and been planning to move to the city next month. The thing is that I've been searching for jobs and saved most of my pay checks. I gave up my apartment and everything, now living with Grandma saving and planning. My plan is to move in with roommates, I don't care if I have to share a room with ten other people sleeping on the floor, I just want to be in the city. My goal is to move there by the 1st of September, regardless of a job. I will consider living in the outer boroughs, or in Jersey if I have to.

    I've been there eight times and now I'm in love and can't stop dreaming about it. I'm aware of the high rent, better than being stuck here in North Carolina without car or license.

    What advice that I could be given about me moving there? Be honest.
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    Aug 06, 2011 2:31 PM GMT
    With a load of degrees, letters of recommendation, and professional networking you are still very fungible. You sound like you really want to make it happen so I wish you the best - but if you watched that one episode of Seinfeld, you are already on notice that the City eats people alive.

    Just be mindful of two important facts: you are not independently wealthy and you are moving without a job. Keep a positive attitude, never turn down a job, work hard, and go get everything you want.

    There are a lot of unemployed people everywhere + you are moving from a low cost of living area to one of the highest + it seems like there is not a significant family/friend infrastructure already in place for you. Why is the move so arbitrarily scheduled for "now?" Is there any justification for it after you say it and step back for a minute?
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    Aug 06, 2011 2:57 PM GMT
    ColorMeBlack saidHi,

    I don't care if I have to share a room with ten other people sleeping on the floor, I just want to be in the city. My goal is to move there by the 1st of September, regardless of a job. I will consider living in the outer boroughs, or in Jersey if I have to.

    I've been there eight times and now I'm in love and can't stop dreaming about it. I'm aware of the high rent, better than being stuck here in North Carolina without car or license.

    What advice that I could be given about me moving there? Be honest.


    Oh, I guarantee it: you WOULD mind sleeping on the floor in a room with 10 other people. icon_razz.gif

    There's too much emotion in this message. You just got laid off. Crunch the numbers on how much you have saved up and what you can afford in terms of rent. I wouldn't move to the city without having secured a job first. It doesn't matter how much you love it. The city will still be there for you while you plan on how to get there smoothly. As much as you love NYC, you'll hate it when you realize you don't have the money to enjoy it.

    I agree with the idea that the city can eat you alive. I mean, there are people there who make 6 figures who don't have a dime in a savings account. I also think that NC can't be that bad of a place. What if things get better for you there? The cost of living is soooo much lower there. Seriously, you need to think long and hard about this.
  • swogdog

    Posts: 143

    Aug 06, 2011 3:13 PM GMT
    Sounds to me like you want to feel like you've lived. So do it. Live. Who cares if it sucks for a while or it's hard, or you fail. You'll have lived, and then can move on. Maybe even enjoy NC again knowing the difference.
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    Aug 06, 2011 3:30 PM GMT
    I'm on the fence about this.

    On the one hand you have no job, no family here and are just moving with whatever savings you have which is very risky and can turn your love of the city into bitter hatred. I've seen it happen before which is too bad because this is a great city to live in, if you have money and can afford your own apartment/ sharing with (one) other person.

    I'm very lucky that when I moved here I had family to stay with; otherwise I'd be on the street or living back at home.

    On the other hand, people who have no family or job have done this and do it every day. Many made it despite the hardships because they really did love the city that much. New York is one of the few cities in the nation you can move to with nothing and have a job within a week or two. If you love NYC this much you'll find a way to make it work out for you.

    BTW, there's more to New York than Manhattan. There's 4 other boroughs that are cheaper to live in. I'd recommend looking in Brooklyn, Queens and even in Hoboken.
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    Aug 06, 2011 4:08 PM GMT
    Ehanson saidI'm on the fence about this.

    On the one hand you have no job, no family here and are just moving with whatever savings you have which is very risky and can turn your love of the city into bitter hatred. I've seen it happen before which is too bad because this is a great city to live in, if you have money and can afford your own apartment/ sharing with (one) other person.

    I'm very lucky that when I moved here I had family to stay with; otherwise I'd be on the street or living back at home.

    On the other hand, people who have no family or job have done this and do it every day. Many made it despite the hardships because they really did love the city that much. New York is one of the few cities in the nation you can move to with nothing and have a job within a week or two. If you love NYC this much you'll find a way to make it work out for you.

    BTW, there's more to New York than Manhattan. There's 4 other boroughs that are cheaper to live in. I'd recommend looking in Brooklyn, Queens and even in Hoboken.


    I'm pretty sure that I'll be one of the "many" who made it despite the hardship, regardless of family and friends. One says "if you really want something, you'll find a way to get it. I have been planning my move for months and I feel in my heart that I'm ready now.
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    Aug 06, 2011 4:10 PM GMT
    swogdog saidSounds to me like you want to feel like you've lived. So do it. Live. Who cares if it sucks for a while or it's hard, or you fail. You'll have lived, and then can move on. Maybe even enjoy NC again knowing the difference.


    Thanks to you! You are right on the money as to exactly what I'm doing. You will never know the difference unless you lived it!
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    Aug 06, 2011 4:10 PM GMT
    Based on your post, you're not ready. You should get a job first. The city is very expensive and it's unforgiving to those who don't have the money.

    I will tell you that you need to be pulling at least 60K to live reasonably comfortably in an outer borough and party in the city. If you're making 90K, you can probably afford your own (small) place in a decent area of Manhattan. It's really not easy.

    But I'm looking at it extremely rationally. That's how I do things. However, if your heart's in New York, then don't let anyone stop you.
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    Aug 06, 2011 4:26 PM GMT
    The best thing about living in Manhattan is being able to tell people you live in Manhattan. Otherwise, it's a hassle.
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    Aug 06, 2011 4:28 PM GMT
    Find a job here first baby, then you can make big plans!

    I live in NYC, and there is truth to their statements about being broke but the city has a lot more to offer than just spending money.

    I live here alone, in a pretty decent size apartment with my dog and get along okay. I don't have any degrees to fall back on, but I am pretty smart ;)

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    Aug 06, 2011 4:28 PM GMT
    darius30 said
    ColorMeBlack saidHi,

    I don't care if I have to share a room with ten other people sleeping on the floor, I just want to be in the city. My goal is to move there by the 1st of September, regardless of a job. I will consider living in the outer boroughs, or in Jersey if I have to.

    I've been there eight times and now I'm in love and can't stop dreaming about it. I'm aware of the high rent, better than being stuck here in North Carolina without car or license.

    What advice that I could be given about me moving there? Be honest.


    Oh, I guarantee it: you WOULD mind sleeping on the floor in a room with 10 other people. icon_razz.gif

    There's too much emotion in this message. You just got laid off. Crunch the numbers on how much you have saved up and what you can afford in terms of rent. I wouldn't move to the city without having secured a job first. It doesn't matter how much you love it. The city will still be there for you while you plan on how to get there smoothly. As much as you love NYC, you'll hate it when you realize you don't have the money to enjoy it.

    I agree with the idea that the city can eat you alive. I mean, there are people there who make 6 figures who don't have a dime in a savings account. I also think that NC can't be that bad of a place. What if things get better for you there? The cost of living is soooo much lower there. Seriously, you need to think long and hard about this.



    I don't have to be rich to live in the city, all it matters is that I am willing to take the risk no matter what it cost me. How am I going to know whether it works out or not unless I've lived there.

    I know I'm ready, I've been planning for months financially, physcially, and spritually. If I HAVE TO, I don't mind the floor, better to be independent in NYC than have to depend on others here in NC, Trust me, as long as I been living in NC without transportation, yes its time for my move.
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    Aug 06, 2011 4:32 PM GMT
    adam228 saidFind a job here first baby, then you can make big plans!

    I live in NYC, and there is truth to their statements about being broke but the city has a lot more to offer than just spending money.

    I live here alone, in a pretty decent size apartment with my dog and get along okay. I don't have any degrees to fall back on, but I am pretty smart ;)




    Of course I will need a job before my move, I've been working on it for months. Even though without a job, there still my savings, plus its not like I'm getting a apartment. Its better to find jobs there in person. I will work my way up despite the hardship. I am determined and ready.
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    Aug 06, 2011 4:41 PM GMT
    closer85 saidBased on your post, you're not ready. You should get a job first. The city is very expensive and it's unforgiving to those who don't have the money.

    I will tell you that you need to be pulling at least 60K to live reasonably comfortably in an outer borough and party in the city. If you're making 90K, you can probably afford your own (small) place in a decent area of Manhattan. It's really not easy.

    But I'm looking at it extremely rationally. That's how I do things. However, if your heart's in New York, then don't let anyone stop you.


    I'm sorry but I don't buy that. How am I going to know wheter it works out or not unless I've lived there and experienced it? I don't have to be rich to live there.

    I'm still working on my job search. I have a degree, my savings, plus my own business. So therefore I'm ready.
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    Aug 06, 2011 4:45 PM GMT
    JackNWNJ saidThe best thing about living in Manhattan is being able to tell people you live in Manhattan. Otherwise, it's a hassle.



    It will be an experience.
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    Aug 06, 2011 4:48 PM GMT
    I never understood why in the advice of others people always chose the harder route.

    You are getting good advice from people, and some people that already live here. You might think you can just come here with your savings, but whats going to happen when you can't find a job? You've already been looking for months, you could have to look for months more.

    That's not really the best way to come into this city. If you want to make it you need to come here with a plan, not just move here, live in a cramped apartment with 10 people and somehow hope it falls into place.

    You'll be greyhoundin' back to grandmas if you do it that way.
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    Aug 06, 2011 4:56 PM GMT
    adam228 saidI never understood why in the advice of others people always chose the harder route.

    You are getting good advice from people, and some people that already live here. You might think you can just come here with your savings, but whats going to happen when you can't find a job? You've already been looking for months, you could have to look for months more.

    That's not really the best way to come into this city. If you want to make it you need to come here with a plan, not just move here, live in a cramped apartment with 10 people and somehow hope it falls into place.

    You'll be greyhoundin' back to grandmas if you do it that way.



    If that happens, it will happen. It not for you to decide how will it work out for me. Despite all of the advices, I'm sticking with my orginal plan. I have been through many living conditions, so a cramped apartment wouldn't bother me.

    Whoever were the ones who lived there is from their experiences, but I'm not them. It depends on me and where I'm getting into. Plus I do have incoming income from another source, so therefore I have nothing to worry about.
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    Aug 06, 2011 5:17 PM GMT
    Every year hundreds of twenty-something gays move to New York City in search of the two L's: Labels and Love.


    As someone who has been in Manhattan for just shy of a decade and is settling down in the outer boro, Good Luck! It's going to be an adventure!
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:05 PM GMT
    Well, CMB, I do admire that kind of resolve.

    If you've thought about it enough, and have considered all the pros and cons, then you should do it.

    I personally like the idea of what others have mentioned about moving somewhere that won't be as taxing financially, yet is close enough that you can hop on the train and enjoy the city.

    I know it's not the same as living in Manhattan, but it's a good compromise.

    When I was in my 20's, I too thought the city would be the solution to all my problems. It never happened, but today I live in the suburbs which is just 40 minutes from Philly and a bit under 2 hrs from NYC. It's the perfect compromise.

    I hope everything works out for you.
    Good luck!
  • Msljocknyc

    Posts: 35

    Aug 06, 2011 7:16 PM GMT
    ColorMeBlack said

    If that happens, it will happen. It not for you to decide how will it work out for me. Despite all of the advices, I'm sticking with my orginal plan. I have been through many living conditions, so a cramped apartment wouldn't bother me.

    Whoever were the ones who lived there is from their experiences, but I'm not them. It depends on me and where I'm getting into. Plus I do have incoming income from another source, so therefore I have nothing to worry about.


    Go for it. Ive been in NYC all my life, and yeah it CAN be expensive if you decide to do all the expensive things, like living in manhattan, taking cabs, shopping at Whole Foods supermarket, expensive clubs and drinks, etc.... Find a place with roommates, and in an outer borough like queens, brooklyn, nice neighborhoods and much cheaper than manhattan. Take the subway and buses, for $2.50 you can go anywhere in the city. Shop at supermarkets with good deals instead of the overpriced organic food supermarkets. Go to bars with no cover, do happy hour. The city can be what you make of it. Worst case scenario, u go back home. Like you said though at least u'll have had the experience. The worst feeling would be the regret if you never even tried it out. Good luck
  • MarvelClimber

    Posts: 511

    Aug 06, 2011 7:17 PM GMT
    I moved here with no job and no family. I did have close friends though. And I was able to stay with my best friend for the first month while I job- and apartment-searched. You can find places in Brooklyn for close to $800/mo sharing with 2 or 3 people. Of course it gets cheaper if you rent a loft and share with 4 or 5. You don't want to come here without at least $4K saved.

    Be prepared for sticker shock. The most basic needs are going to be a lot more than in NC. Do research on your job industry and who's hiring. Make sure your resume is up to par and you're prepared to write customized cover letters for everything you apply to. It's very easy to accept a low-paying job here and get in a rut. You'll find yourself working so hard just to keep up, that it will be hard to find the time to apply for new jobs and interview. So, you really have to go all out when you first arrive. Save all the partying until you have steady income.

    I was relentless in my job search and I also got lucky finding an excellent job that fits my strengths and preferred work environment. I also lucked out on finding a great place to live. But a lot are not so lucky. So, don't let the glamour of the city lure you before you're ready. That glamour will always be here, but you won't if you don't plan your move well.

    Good luck!
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    Aug 06, 2011 8:30 PM GMT
    HisAlterEgo saidI moved here with no job and no family. I did have close friends though. And I was able to stay with my best friend for the first month while I job- and apartment-searched. You can find places in Brooklyn for close to $800/mo sharing with 2 or 3 people. Of course it gets cheaper if you rent a loft and share with 4 or 5. You don't want to come here without at least $4K saved.

    Be prepared for sticker shock. The most basic needs are going to be a lot more than in NC. Do research on your job industry and who's hiring. Make sure your resume is up to par and you're prepared to write customized cover letters for everything you apply to. It's very easy to accept a low-paying job here and get in a rut. You'll find yourself working so hard just to keep up, that it will be hard to find the time to apply for new jobs and interview. So, you really have to go all out when you first arrive. Save all the partying until you have steady income.

    I was relentless in my job search and I also got lucky finding an excellent job that fits my strengths and preferred work environment. I also lucked out on finding a great place to live. But a lot are not so lucky. So, don't let the glamour of the city lure you before you're ready. That glamour will always be here, but you won't if you don't plan your move well.

    Good luck!


    Thank you. I am aware about the high living costs and everything. I have been working hard to prepare for my move, and I believe my plan is actually working. Of course I will not know a living soul there, and I'm exploring other options like living in the outer boroughs. I really don't believe that I need $4K to be there. I don't have to be rich to live there. I really don't care about the glamour stuff that goes on there, it what I make of the city that matters.





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    Aug 06, 2011 8:33 PM GMT
    MascMslNYC said
    ColorMeBlack said

    If that happens, it will happen. It not for you to decide how will it work out for me. Despite all of the advices, I'm sticking with my orginal plan. I have been through many living conditions, so a cramped apartment wouldn't bother me.

    Whoever were the ones who lived there is from their experiences, but I'm not them. It depends on me and where I'm getting into. Plus I do have incoming income from another source, so therefore I have nothing to worry about.


    Go for it. Ive been in NYC all my life, and yeah it CAN be expensive if you decide to do all the expensive things, like living in manhattan, taking cabs, shopping at Whole Foods supermarket, expensive clubs and drinks, etc.... Find a place with roommates, and in an outer borough like queens, brooklyn, nice neighborhoods and much cheaper than manhattan. Take the subway and buses, for $2.50 you can go anywhere in the city. Shop at supermarkets with good deals instead of the overpriced organic food supermarkets. Go to bars with no cover, do happy hour. The city can be what you make of it. Worst case scenario, u go back home. Like you said though at least u'll have had the experience. The worst feeling would be the regret if you never even tried it out. Good luck


    You are so right about Whole Foods! I've spent $40 on one spaghetti dinner. Thanks for the advice!
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14351

    Aug 06, 2011 9:04 PM GMT
    Why not look at other American major cities for a potential relocation. Why all this emphasis on NYCicon_question.gif Check out other cities because NYC is so damn expensive and has some of the highest taxes in the nation because it is located in the highest taxed state in the nation.
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    Aug 06, 2011 9:19 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidWhy not look at other American major cities for a potential relocation. Why all this emphasis on NYCicon_question.gif Check out other cities because NYC is so damn expensive and has some of the highest taxes in the nation because it is located in the highest taxed state in the nation.


    Like I told the other guys here, I don't have to be rich to live there. NYC is like my home, I felt I belonged there.
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    Aug 06, 2011 9:20 PM GMT
    ColorMeBlack said
    MascMslNYC said
    ColorMeBlack said
    [...]
    You are so right about Whole Foods! I've spent $40 on one spaghetti dinner. Thanks for the advice!


    But the advantage of Whole Foods in the after work hours is that it's a place to cruise, in addition to being like a food museum.