Gout

  • Roads2Abs

    Posts: 39

    Aug 06, 2011 2:22 PM GMT
    Have you guys ever had it? How did you get rid of it?
  • denus

    Posts: 46

    Aug 06, 2011 2:35 PM GMT
    I have it bad myself. Get flareups a couple of times a year. All the things I read that you eat that contributes to it, though... I'd starve myself if I had to give those up. :s

    For treating a flareup, anti-inflammatories work for me. Soaking it in hot water as soon as you start feeling it is supposed to help, and there are bunches of folk remedies. Once the flareup is at its peak, though, you can't do much aside from wait it out.
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    Aug 06, 2011 2:53 PM GMT
    Roads2Abs saidHave you guys ever had it? How did you get rid of it?

    You're a bit young for it. Do you have a competent diagnosis? Had a second opinion?

    There is a form of arthritis in the feet that mimics gout. And indeed, the 2 are very closely related, though true gout is caused by an excess of uric acid. Arthritis often happens to people who put a lot of stress on their feet, like I did in the US Army. And so arthritis that acts like gout is what I have today.

    I see you biking, boarding, in rough terrain, doing other active things that stress the feet. Much like I did, minus the boarding, lots of running & climbing. So where do you get your diagnosis of gout? Has it been confirmed?

    You can Google gout, learn a lot, caused by too much uric acid in your system. Diet and some drugs can control it. But first, have you absolutely determined that you have true gout? Or stress-induced arthritis? Which one you have will determine how to treat it.

    You can get rid of neither condition 100%, but you can make them bearable. The VA wanted to "pin" my big toe joint as their solution, so it couldn't move, but I refused. I either work through the pain, knowing it will eventually stop, or take some ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil or similar).
  • Roads2Abs

    Posts: 39

    Sep 06, 2011 6:23 AM GMT
    denus saidI have it bad myself. Get flareups a couple of times a year. All the things I read that you eat that contributes to it, though... I'd starve myself if I had to give those up. :s

    For treating a flareup, anti-inflammatories work for me. Soaking it in hot water as soon as you start feeling it is supposed to help, and there are bunches of folk remedies. Once the flareup is at its peak, though, you can't do much aside from wait it out.


    It seems like it's taking forever to get over. My ankle is still a little sore and it's been a few weeks!
  • Roads2Abs

    Posts: 39

    Sep 06, 2011 6:25 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Roads2Abs saidHave you guys ever had it? How did you get rid of it?

    You're a bit young for it. Do you have a competent diagnosis? Had a second opinion?

    There is a form of arthritis in the feet that mimics gout. And indeed, the 2 are very closely related, though true gout is caused by an excess of uric acid. Arthritis often happens to people who put a lot of stress on their feet, like I did in the US Army. And so arthritis that acts like gout is what I have today.

    I see you biking, boarding, in rough terrain, doing other active things that stress the feet. Much like I did, minus the boarding, lots of running & climbing. So where do you get your diagnosis of gout? Has it been confirmed?

    You can Google gout, learn a lot, caused by too much uric acid in your system. Diet and some drugs can control it. But first, have you absolutely determined that you have true gout? Or stress-induced arthritis? Which one you have will determine how to treat it.

    You can get rid of neither condition 100%, but you can make them bearable. The VA wanted to "pin" my big toe joint as their solution, so it couldn't move, but I refused. I either work through the pain, knowing it will eventually stop, or take some ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil or similar).


    I would rather not take medication for it. It could be a combination of my weight and the amount I am active. I did a lot of research and I have decided that it was the Oysters and Lobster that finally set it off! I read somewhere that I should not take Advil and should take Tylenol instead. Either way, it has subsided right now, but I do take a lot better care in what I eat and how much. I am reducing everything to reduce my weight and weight on my feet.
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    Sep 06, 2011 6:45 AM GMT
    I don't think age has anything to do with it. I think it's mostly diet and partly genetics. Acquaintance of mine got it after college. His doctor said it was from too much alcohol and red meat. I don't think he takes medication. But he's really made a change in his lifestyle.. doesn't drink as much and eats more healthier/lighter. He still gets occasional outbreaks, or whatever they're called. But it's not as painful/crippling as it was before; Now that he knows what triggers it.
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    Sep 06, 2011 6:54 AM GMT
    Roads2Abs saidIt could be a combination of my weight and the amount I am active. I did a lot of research and I have decided that it was the Oysters and Lobster that finally set it off!


    "Could be"? "Have decided"?

    I asked you earlier above if you had gotten a competent diagnosis. Until that happens, you don't have gout, you don't have arthritis, you don't have anything but sore feet.

    You need to see a physician, probably get some x-rays. Gout at 29 is somewhat unusual, though arthritis, and impact injuries are less rare. Until you see a doctor you're just guessing here, and the rest of us can't advise you in any way.
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    Sep 06, 2011 7:14 AM GMT
    Art_Deco -

    Gout, is essentially a form of arthritis. And It's not so much age as you emphasize (though it is more common in people over 30, primarily men). Diet alone counts for over 10% of gout. Then there's the genetic predisposition aspect, and even certain medications.

    Those with gout should follow a low protein diet and restrict consumption of sugar (soda, fruit juices, etc.), alcohol, meat and seafood.

    OP -

    Did you get properly diagnosed by your doctor? Did you have any blood work or a urine test to check your uric acid levels?

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    Sep 06, 2011 7:19 AM GMT
    Shahzadeh saidOP -

    Did you get properly diagnosed by your doctor? Did you have any blood work or a urine test to check your uric acid levels?

    Exactly. What I said above. And perhaps get some x-rays, or whatever a physician thinks is necessary to obtain a diagnosis. This is a worthless discussion, I might as well be saying "I think I'm pregnant." icon_razz.gif
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    Sep 06, 2011 7:22 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Shahzadeh saidOP -

    Did you get properly diagnosed by your doctor? Did you have any blood work or a urine test to check your uric acid levels?

    Exactly. What I said above. And perhaps get some x-rays, or whatever a physician thinks is necessary to obtain a diagnosis. This is a worthless discussion, I might as well be saying "I think I'm pregnant." icon_razz.gif


    Haha, true. Art I think doctors can even take out some fluid from the joint. Come to think of it, it's not so much the high uric acid levels...but rather when they form into crystals, then it becomes problematic...