Whats your opinion regarding college diplomas?

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    Aug 06, 2011 6:21 PM GMT
    Are you one of those that believes the most expensive better named colleges get you better jobs, or the one that believes the person holding the degree will get the better job. I have debated this many times, as I have friends at Rice and Stanford. They seem to believe that just since their degree says that University they are bound for amazing job oppurtunities. I think it does open up doors, but I'll put myself up against anyone even those Harvard students. Personality, Work Experience, Networking and of course Education play a huge role in getting that dream job. What do you think?
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    Aug 06, 2011 6:29 PM GMT
    msuNtx saidAre you one of those that believes the most expensive better named colleges get you better jobs, or the one that believes the person holding the degree will get the better job. I have debated this many times, as I have friends at Rice and Stanford. They seem to believe that just since their degree says that University they are bound for amazing job oppurtunities. I think it does open up doors, but I'll put myself up against anyone even those Harvard students. Personality, Work Experience, Networking and of course Education play a huge role in getting that dream job. What do you think?


    It can depend on the industry you're in. Some people (still) look at the piece of paper and school, and give preferential treatment over others who might be from a "lesser" school. I won't say whether it's right, but it does still happen.

    Personally, I don't care where someone went to school. I'm more concerned with whether they can do the job.
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    Aug 06, 2011 6:32 PM GMT
    No question that doors get opened by Harvard and Yale, but an interesting study showed that kids with the same SAT scores and GPAs did as well in life. Still to start out it's a huge leg up.
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    Aug 06, 2011 6:46 PM GMT
    These days, it's all about who you know and not so much about what you know. My last company heavily hired people from UCLA. The CEO and a few of the VP's were all UCLA alumni. Coincidence? Probably not. So yeah, I don't think going to a particular school will guarantee you a dream job. But it will certainly help you get your foot in the door, depending on the industry.
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    Aug 06, 2011 6:58 PM GMT
    msuNtx saidWhats your opinion regarding college diplomas? Are you one of those that believes the most expensive better named colleges get you better jobs... What do you think?

    Diplomas???, as you probably have learned, there's no guarantees! Diplomas don't means nothing in this days! Once I get one, I put my diploma on the wall and keep moving until I've finished decorating my wall...
    24bw7b8.jpg
  • mybud

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    Aug 06, 2011 6:58 PM GMT
    I never regretted working towards my degree...And ya you can compare yourself with college educated peers..... but bottom line most hire the guy with the education...
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:10 PM GMT
    msuNtx saidAre you one of those that believes the most expensive better named colleges get you better jobs, or the one that believes the person holding the degree will get the better job. I have debated this many times, as I have friends at Rice and Stanford. They seem to believe that just since their degree says that University they are bound for amazing job oppurtunities. I think it does open up doors, but I'll put myself up against anyone even those Harvard students. Personality, Work Experience, Networking and of course Education play a huge role in getting that dream job. What do you think?


    Graduates of big expensive schools have the networking edge.
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:20 PM GMT
    Absolutely! It better, or what's the point?!?
    (I would not have been happy if I had ever lost out to some state schooled, scholarshipped person.)

    Tristan
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:23 PM GMT
    I grew up in the Bill Clinton-era: I was in fourth grade when he was elected the first time. During those years, things were great. My generation grew up with the idea that if you went to college, you were guaranteed a job once you obtained a degree. That no longer applies.

    So I continue to wonder--does a college education matter? I am one of the fortunate ones who has a college education (times two) and has working experience. That is better compared to this generation (that has developed over the past 10 years) where we've been in such a decline economy wise, that anyone who does receive a college education (bachelor or masters) is not guaranteed to find anything. It sucks hardcore for this generation (and possibly the next) because it's NOT the American dream--the one I was brought up with.
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:29 PM GMT
    As was mentioned, it depends. I want to get into computer game programming, highly doubt going to Harvard Law would increase my chances any rather than just a standard CS/CIS diploma.

    Now, keep in mind that the opposite is definitely true. Going to a crap school that is notorious for basically handing out diplomas is certainly going to look bad.

    And yes, a college degree fucking matters. It means you actually care about learning about different subjects, it means you actually care about education, it means you give a damn about how the world works. Plus you get paid more.
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:38 PM GMT
    Diplomas (college or above) serve to remind you how smart you once were. icon_lol.gif
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:41 PM GMT
    Gaymerboy saidAs was mentioned, it depends. I want to get into computer game programming, highly doubt going to Harvard Law would increase my chances any rather than just a standard CS/CIS diploma.


    Erm ... Major logic flaw.

    How many Harvard Law graduates go into computer game programming? VERY few, if any. Furthermore, the Harvard law graduate who chooses to pursue the job would likely have experience in the field and would stand a very good chance at winning in the "application game."
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:45 PM GMT
    I work with people who almost all went to private schools. The only difference is they're drowning in debt while I'm not.
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:49 PM GMT
    I would only marry someone from UNI

    that is to say KardioKing, my RJ love forever
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:52 PM GMT
    Its more connections you make through that school than the name of the school or anything.... The name looks good, but connections are the biter
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:53 PM GMT
    An application to a job is a story about yourself you tell to the particular employer. Degrees from big name colleges in many cases make the story better, but there are other things you can use to make your story better as well. All else equal I'm sure a degree from a good college makes a significant difference but there are other things that make a big difference.

    I do want to emphasize that one of the misconceptions that many people who ask such questions seem to have is that the person who went to a good college only has that, so another person might outdo him in other areas. Usually I find that people who put in work and effort to get to those colleges tend on average to also have put in work in other areas that improve their 'story'. Some of the resumes I see for people applying to med school from Wash U, for example, are just crazy. These people clearly spent a lot of time from as early as high school to not only create an academic story, but a coherent life story about their interests and abilities, and why they are good candidates for whatever it is they're asking me to recommend them for.
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:53 PM GMT
    I think it's more about what you major in rather than which college you go to.

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    Aug 06, 2011 7:56 PM GMT
    Vorsicht said
    HaloJockNYC saidIt sucks hardcore for this generation (and possibly the next) because it's NOT the American dream--the one I was brought up with.


    maybe you should try to exchange it. your generation's submitting, still chasing that very same dream, imposes the same shit reality that you're experiencing on everyone else.

    it'd be nice if some of you took a stance.


    Okay, that made absolutely no sense but...okay.
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    Aug 06, 2011 7:59 PM GMT
    No need to debate something with friends when there's clear evidence and extensive studies that Ivy Leaguers have a much higher advantage....
  • slimnmuscly

    Posts: 541

    Aug 06, 2011 8:09 PM GMT
    It helps, and the extent to which it helps probably depends on the field, but ultimately what's decisive is the person holding the degree and what experience he's cultivated along the way. Someone going to a less impressive school just has to look harder for ways to augment the value of his degree.

    I got mine at a not-so-renowned state school but interned (unpaid) with a prestigious, internationally renowned institution and wowed the guy I worked for, who's someone whose word is gold in his field. A good word from him helped get my foot through an important door that led to my current job, a rare one I would never have thought I could have gotten.

    In fact, I remember thinking it would be impossible to get an internship there -- that they'd have a backlog of Harvard and Rice students -- but I was the first intern the guy I worked for had ever had; I just impressed him enough that he decided to create the internship for a summer. I worked a crappy clerical job in a law firm to pay the bills and worked with him for free. It paid off in spades.
  • ohioguy12

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    Aug 06, 2011 8:27 PM GMT
    I'm a big believer that it's all about who you know.
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    Aug 06, 2011 8:43 PM GMT
    As many have said, the answer depends. If you are in consulting, it absolutely does. If you are in a professional career, Medicine, Law etc, it mostly does depending on what graduate program you attend and if you've had to defend a thesis, participate in practicums, programs etc.

    However, if you are going into sales, advertising, project management, retail, etc, having a degree from anywhere may help you with your salary negotion and networking only. Where education tends to really help is with networking resources... For example, the University of Texas has a special program in _____ and a couple graduates from that program went on to do well at ______ company. The hiring managers in _____ company or their HR staff may want to target other graduates from UT's special program. Or those alum who have found a position may reach out to the school to find peers.



  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Aug 06, 2011 9:11 PM GMT
    I think that too few people actually think through why exactly they go to college in the first place. It seems to be little more than the next stage along the conveyor belt through life that most high school graduates find themselves on. Most haven't even given it much thought, knowing simply that it's what their parents want them to do, or what most of their friends are doing. Many are utterly incurious about anything whatsoever.

    My personal opinion is that college is wasted on about 30% of the students I see on a daily basis, and I teach at a top-ranked university where you'd expect them to be stellar achievers.

    Some of the smartest people I know do not have college educations, and some of the dumbest people I know have advanced degrees, so a college degree isn't a diviner of who's smart or not, though having one does mean (most times) greater earning potential in one's lifetime.

    As to the matter of better-known or more expensive universities paving the way to more opportunities: maybe there is an edge in forging connections for job prospects, but not because graduates of those institutions are necessarily either smarter or better prepared.

    One's education is what one makes of it. I've seen students get 100 times more out of their local community college degree than many of those who attended Ivy League universities, mainly because they wanted it more and were personally more vested. Does it mean they'll earn more? No. But at least they know why they went to college in the first place.
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    Aug 06, 2011 10:34 PM GMT
    i personally root for college degrees. heck, i'm smack dab in the middle of completing my second. my phillosophy that i was taught was that it doesn't matter where you got your degree, but how much effort you put into getting that degree. besides being studious, you can spend your time volunteering in your community, or being the president of a fraternity or school club, or even playing sports, etc. the focus should be about the effort, not the name of the institution
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    Aug 06, 2011 10:42 PM GMT
    __Ironic said
    msuNtx saidWhats your opinion regarding college diplomas? Are you one of those that believes the most expensive better named colleges get you better jobs... What do you think?

    Diplomas???, as you probably have learned, there's no guarantees! Diplomas don't means nothing in this days! Once I get one, I put my diploma on the wall and keep moving until I've finished decorating my wall...

    "Diplomas don't means nothing in this days!" LOL...this comment reminds of the question a smart kid asks the "less" smart kid...

    Smart kid: "How far did you go to school?
    Not so smart kid: "About six blocks"

    Just goes to show ya that diplomas don't mean shit!!!